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Something to consider about Nuclear Fallout

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posted on Mar, 14 2011 @ 04:29 PM
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I know this has been posted before, but I would like to remind people that we have been under Nuclear Fallout for years and years. If you watch this video, you will see the world has been bombed with test over and over, and Im pretty sure the fallout has followed many a different jet streams world wide.

I realize this is all scary with the Japan incident now, but why havent you been concerned prior to this with all of this that has been happening all around you for years and years? The horse has been out of the barn for a long time folks.

Personally this is way more scary to me.





posted on Mar, 14 2011 @ 04:30 PM
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reply to post by onehuman
 


Yes, the American southwest has been lit up like the fourth of july...and yet people are screaming doomsday over a reactor leaking across the ocean



Why are ATSers so illogical?



posted on Mar, 14 2011 @ 04:39 PM
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What in GODS holy ass are we doing!!!??? why did we need to release 2000 nukes over 60 years? At least i'm less worried about the effects of the japanese reactor now i've seen that seeing as i've swam in, breathed in and eaten polluted radioactive crap for my entire life according to this video anyway.
Is there a plus to this? can we fight off alien invasion or something with all the r&d that must have gone into it? that'd make me feel a little better...



posted on Mar, 14 2011 @ 04:40 PM
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A nuclear weapon test and a reactor meltdown are two different things. Don't get me wrong, they are both bad but Reactor meltdowns have longer lasting effects. I cAnt find any sources right now because I'm on my iPod and it's too complicated



posted on Mar, 14 2011 @ 04:42 PM
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Incredible how many we have tested, and so little have actually been used.
The reason I am worried about the reactors, is because of the uranium, plutonium, etc.
an how it will effect Japan. At this point I do not believe it will effect anyone on a world scale



posted on Mar, 14 2011 @ 04:42 PM
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this video made me lol... it also made me realize that were drunk... or something... WERE NOT HIGH THOUGH! (high people don't do that but drunk people do!)



posted on Mar, 14 2011 @ 04:44 PM
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The differnece is, those test in the southwest were done underground. it was banned, the detonation of any nuclear deivce, in the atmosphere and above ground. Particles have prob always been with us, at least from those done on ground, but those particles have to travel a long long distance.
ffallout is reffered too in am immediate area or city once a nuclear bomb has gone off. well technically, it could involve spacecraft too. i think it was cassini, before it was launched, NASA wa nervous about it, because if the rocket failed n blew up before leave our atmosphere, they feared the plutonium source on the spacecraft would blanket a very large area, as it settled. plutonium, is the spacecrafts battery if you will. it has been used on pioneer 10, 11, voyager 1 and 2 and cassini, prob on galileo too.



posted on Mar, 14 2011 @ 04:45 PM
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hell i wouldnt be suprised in every person on this planet, has at least particle of radiation form cherynoble!



posted on Mar, 14 2011 @ 04:46 PM
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PLEASE REALIZE they pulled one over on you we stopped above ground testing in IN 1962


Between 16 July 1945 and 23 September 1992, the United States maintained a program of vigorous nuclear testing, with the exception of a moratorium between November 1958 and September 1961. A total of (by official count) 1,054 nuclear tests and two nuclear attacks were conducted, with over 100 of them taking place at sites in the Pacific Ocean, over 900 of them at the Nevada Test Site, and ten on miscellaneous sites in the United States (Alaska, Colorado, Mississippi, and New Mexico).[11] Until November 1962, the vast majority of the U.S. tests were atmospheric (that is, above-ground); after the acceptance of the Partial Test Ban Treaty all testing was regulated underground, in order to prevent the dispersion of nuclear fallout.


Underground tests don't produce fallout.

en.wikipedia.org...
edit on 14-3-2011 by 46ACE because: (no reason given)

edit on 14-3-2011 by 46ACE because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 14 2011 @ 04:46 PM
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Thanks for the replies
Dont get me wrong, I realize a meltdown is a pretty bad thing, it just makes me mad this has been going on for a long time with crap floating around in the air and "Now" everyone is concerned. I really feel for the people in the midwest as they have really taken a major hit and really are clueless about it.



posted on Mar, 14 2011 @ 04:52 PM
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reply to post by 46ACE
 


Yes...but 1962 is still 2 minutes into the video...still a lot of atmospheric tests that were done.



posted on Mar, 14 2011 @ 05:03 PM
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Originally posted by onehuman
Thanks for the replies
Dont get me wrong, I realize a meltdown is a pretty bad thing, it just makes me mad this has been going on for a long time with crap floating around in the air and "Now" everyone is concerned. I really feel for the people in the midwest as they have really taken a major hit and really are clueless about it.


Everyone was concerned - enough to drive the tests underground. Everyone is concerned NOW because above-ground (and very much more than the tests put out) radiation is entering our system. Probably at unprecedented rates, too.



posted on Mar, 14 2011 @ 05:04 PM
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Originally posted by 46ACE
PLEASE REALIZE they pulled one over on you we stopped above ground testing in IN 1962


Between 16 July 1945 and 23 September 1992, the United States maintained a program of vigorous nuclear testing, with the exception of a moratorium between November 1958 and September 1961. A total of (by official count) 1,054 nuclear tests and two nuclear attacks were conducted, with over 100 of them taking place at sites in the Pacific Ocean, over 900 of them at the Nevada Test Site, and ten on miscellaneous sites in the United States (Alaska, Colorado, Mississippi, and New Mexico).[11] Until November 1962, the vast majority of the U.S. tests were atmospheric (that is, above-ground); after the acceptance of the Partial Test Ban Treaty all testing was regulated underground, in order to prevent the dispersion of nuclear fallout.


Underground tests don't produce fallout.

en.wikipedia.org...
edit on 14-3-2011 by 46ACE because: (no reason given)

edit on 14-3-2011 by 46ACE because: (no reason given)


To me, that is even scarier. Just how much havent we seen since then? Oh wait, we couldnt see it because they are hiding it. Above or below ground, no matter how you look at it, just isnt pretty.



posted on Mar, 14 2011 @ 05:54 PM
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Im just curious since we are on the subject. Just how far does the blast spread its nasty stuff underground anyway?

Im guessing it creates a type of crater, which I only say because of countless other threads around here I have read over and seen pictures and things of the aftermath.

What I mean though is, how far does it spread out into the rocks or at what depth do they really test explode them?



posted on Mar, 14 2011 @ 05:58 PM
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And people wonder why cancer rates have sky rocketed in the last 30 years.

Duh.



posted on Mar, 14 2011 @ 06:40 PM
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Originally posted by onehuman
Im just curious since we are on the subject. Just how far does the blast spread its nasty stuff underground anyway?

Im guessing it creates a type of crater, which I only say because of countless other threads around here I have read over and seen pictures and things of the aftermath.

What I mean though is, how far does it spread out into the rocks or at what depth do they really test explode them?

wiki? Its interesting if not exactly comforting.:



Effects

The effects of an underground nuclear test may vary according to factors including the depth and yield of the explosion, as well as the nature of the surrounding rock.[25] If the test is conducted at sufficient depth, the test is said to be contained, with no venting of gases or other contaminants to the environment.[25] In contrast, if the device is buried at insufficient depth ("underburied"), then rock may be expelled by the explosion, forming a crater surrounded by ejecta, and releasing high-pressure gases to the atmosphere (the resulting crater is usually conical in profile, circular, and may range between tens to hundreds of metres in diameter and depth[26]). One figure used in determining how deeply the device should be buried is the scaled depth of burial, or -burst.[25] This figure is calculated as the burial depth in metres divided by the cube root of the yield in kilotons. It is estimated that, in order to ensure containment, this figure should be greater than 100.[25][27]
Zones in surrounding rock Name Radius[26]
Melt cavity 4 – 12 m/kt1/3
Crushed zone 30 – 40 m/kt1/3
Cracked zone 80 – 120 m/kt1/3
Zone of irreversible strain 800 – 1100 m/kt1/3

The energy of the nuclear explosion is released in one microsecond. In the following few microseconds, the test hardware and surrounding rock are vaporised, with temperatures of several million degrees and pressures of several million atmospheres.[25] Within milliseconds, a bubble of high-pressure gas and steam is formed. The heat and expanding shock wave cause the surrounding rock to vaporise, or being melted further away, creating a melt cavity.[26] The shock-induced motion and high internal pressure cause this cavity to expand outwards, which continues over several tenths of a second until the pressure has fallen sufficiently, to the level equal to the level roughly comparable with the weight of the rock above, and can no longer grow.[26] Although not observed in every explosion, four distinct zones (including the melt cavity) have been described in the surrounding rock. The crushed zone, about two times the radius of the cavity, consists of rock that has lost all of its former integrity. The cracked zone, about three times the cavity radius, consists of rock with radial and concentric fissures. Finally, the zone of irreversible strain consists of rock deformed by the pressure.[26] The following layer undergoes only an elastic deformation; the strain and subsequent release then forms a seismic wave. A few seconds later the molten rock starts collecting on the bottom of the cavity and the cavity content begins cooling. The rebound after the shock wave causes compressive forces building up around the cavity, called a stress containment cage, sealing the cracks.[28]



en.wikipedia.org...
edit on 14-3-2011 by 46ACE because: (no reason given)




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