It looks like you're using an Ad Blocker.

Please white-list or disable AboveTopSecret.com in your ad-blocking tool.

Thank you.

 

Some features of ATS will be disabled while you continue to use an ad-blocker.

 

Astrobiology: Life in the Universe Exobiology Extremophiles: Not So Extreme?

page: 1
2

log in

join
share:

posted on Mar, 14 2011 @ 01:40 AM
link   
Seth Shostak of the SETI Institute discusses life living under extreme (to us) conditions, and what this tells us about the search for life beyond Earth. Source astrobiology.nasa.gov...

Many of them are tiny, all of them are tough, and they could be your most distant ancestors.

True to their name (which is a Greco-Latin combo for "someone who loves extremes"), extremophiles can batten and fatten in conditions that humans - and most other species - would consider off limits. The first of these sturdy organisms to be discovered, a thermophile, was found in the late 1960s in Yellowstone National Park, hanging out in one of the hot springs. It was a bacterium with a name bigger than itself: Thermus aquaticus (literally, "warm bath water dweller." Species names are often surprisingly prosaic once you translate them.)

Thermus aquaticus not only withstood, but thrived, in temperatures above 160 F. For comparison, try turning on the hot water tap at home, and let it run. It will scald your hand, but the temperature won't exceed 140 F. This is observational proof that you are not a thermophile. read more> www.space.com...


Recent studies in this new exiting field astrobiology.nasa.gov...

I've been watching the Planet Green channel which is at the moment airing "The Hottest Place on Earth" series/special "Unlocking the secrets of the Danakil Desert in Ethiopia." They are talking about extremophiles. This is a field of study that opens up amazing possibilities of all sorts of life that could exist on other planets in hostile environments that do not fit into the "Goldilocks" category of planets.

Anyone else into this interest area involving such possibilities?

It's the type of alien life theory I really enjoy.




posted on Mar, 14 2011 @ 01:42 AM
link   
Ya look up "the water bear" there's some amazing shut out the bro.



posted on Mar, 14 2011 @ 01:43 AM
link   
lava monsters and ice creatures are really not as far-fetched at one would imagine.



posted on Mar, 14 2011 @ 01:51 AM
link   
It opens up a whole new area of study and research, an infinite number of what if's.
I think it's amazing.
I have discussed this loosely a time or two with a few others of open mind.
Our usual ''game'' was a toss back and forth on the question of: ''What if each and every enviornment, climate, planet, open space, or the trillions of bodys that compose the heavens/universe were a perfect balance of life for many different life forms''?

With that comes the next inevitable question, exactly what could be called a life form? Would it be physical, etheral, electrical, and so on.

The limits of expansion into such a study are as infinite as the universe itself.



posted on Mar, 14 2011 @ 02:12 AM
link   

Originally posted by XxRagingxPandaxX
Ya look up "the water bear" there's some amazing shut out the bro.


Oh, COOL! Pretty far out! I have never heard of it before. I appreciate the possible interest note. :-) I just got finished watching this> www.sciencefriday.com...



posted on Mar, 14 2011 @ 02:13 AM
link   

Originally posted by yourmaker
lava monsters and ice creatures are really not as far-fetched at one would imagine.


Speaking of "ice monsters" www.arctic.noaa.gov... Amazing I think.



posted on Mar, 14 2011 @ 02:14 AM
link   

Originally posted by TheSilverGate
It opens up a whole new area of study and research, an infinite number of what if's.
I think it's amazing.
I have discussed this loosely a time or two with a few others of open mind.
Our usual ''game'' was a toss back and forth on the question of: ''What if each and every enviornment, climate, planet, open space, or the trillions of bodys that compose the heavens/universe were a perfect balance of life for many different life forms''?

With that comes the next inevitable question, exactly what could be called a life form? Would it be physical, etheral, electrical, and so on.

The limits of expansion into such a study are as infinite as the universe itself.


And also I've heard something entertaining the idea that the Universe itself could be a type of cell that is part of a larger system that might be alive. Have you ever heard of such an idea? I am coming up empty on the internet on it at the moment. Still messing around with the key words.



new topics

top topics



 
2

log in

join