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Was America hit with Radiation when they bombed Japan with 2 nukes?

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posted on Mar, 12 2011 @ 10:16 AM
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I'm just wondering since I see alot of talk about the US being engulfed in Radiation. Is this worse than 2 huge nuclear bombs that were dropped on the country in WWII? Seems like the bombs would have been alot more dangerous yet nothing seemed to happen in the US that I know of.

Just curious to see why people think this is different.
edit on 12-3-2011 by mayabong because: (no reason given)




posted on Mar, 12 2011 @ 10:18 AM
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reply to post by mayabong
 


good critical thinking sir.



posted on Mar, 12 2011 @ 10:29 AM
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Could be the handful of thousands of nuclear "test" bombs they've detonated in this country.

There's a post here somewhere that has a link to a video that shows how many USA and other countries have detonated, but I fail at the search function on this site.



posted on Mar, 12 2011 @ 10:36 AM
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Originally posted by mayabong
I'm just wondering since I see alot of talk about the US being engulfed in Radiation. Is this worse than 2 huge nuclear bombs that were dropped on the country in WWII? Seems like the bombs would have been alot more dangerous yet nothing seemed to happen in the US that I know of.

Just curious to see why people think this is different.
edit on 12-3-2011 by mayabong because: (no reason given)


The answer is 'of course'
Firstly the bombs were relativley tiny, Secondly the cloud reached the level of the jetstream and the jetstream goes west to east so yes it gets to america just like the japanese balloon bombs got to america,.
The atmosphere is quite large and dilution enters into it, but the isotopes are still out there in the land sea and air as are their daughters.
It is no different radiation leakage, just much less and probably a lesser variety of isotopes, not necessarily less dangerous ones either.
HTH

edit on 12-3-2011 by FriedrichNeecher because: nuclear decay



posted on Mar, 12 2011 @ 10:45 AM
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The Devices that were dropped on Japan during WWII were very small compared to todays nukes. Little Boy was about 13KT and Fat Man was about 21KT

If any radiation was detected on the west coast of the US it probably would have been just barely noticable above background levels. But I don't think we had intstruments sensitive enough at the time to tell.

The Tsar Bomba was originally a 100 MegaTon device but was scaled down to 50MT. The fallout from that was detected around the globe.

The reason for Russia developing so many large nuclear bombs was because they did not have very good guidance systems like the US did. So with such large devices they could miss the target by a mile or so and still get satisfactory results.

Most people are not aware of this, but there have been 1,000's of nuclear tests at all levels of altitude.


edit on 12-3-2011 by watchitburn because: spelling



posted on Mar, 12 2011 @ 11:01 AM
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My theory is that atomic bombs are different than thermo nuclear bombs. This was a relatively new concept and people were still figuring it out, and atomic bombs were the first step, sort of like a proof of concept. Then they progressed to thermo nuclear bombs which is what would be used today.



posted on Mar, 12 2011 @ 11:26 AM
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reply to post by Skewed
 


You're right somewhat. Modern nukes use fission devices as the "trigger" to start a fusion reaction in a second set of material which causes the main explosion. Fusion causes a much higher percentage use of the material. Fission is very wasteful. To be completely frank, Fusion bombs are "cleaner" than fission bombs due to this. Though you will still have fallout due to the vaporized target being irradiated with particles from the fission device.

Editing also to add on topic, but likely the two devices were not detected. Geiger counters weren't sophisticated and most universities didn't study nuclear reactions. So even if there were devices able to be measured, they likely weren't in use or deployed. So we don't know for sure. But you can look at information from Chernobyl and likely find the answer to your question as to how far the radiation spread.
edit on 3/12/2011 by Sir Solomon because: Lack of caffination made an interruption between my brain and my hands, causing word displacement.



posted on Mar, 12 2011 @ 11:48 AM
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reply to post by Sir Solomon
 


Just wondering, was the questions intent originally whether there was detection or whether there was liklihood of contamination form atomic blasts in the atmosphere during ww2?
Because It would change my original answer. Of course, if a govt source said they detected nothing, you'd believe that without reservation, right? There's no reason that theyve ever lied about radiation safety in the past, so in that case, we'd be good.




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