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What actually will happen if Japanese nuclear reactor Melts down?

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posted on Mar, 12 2011 @ 12:20 AM
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I would love to hear from anyone with a real clue about what will happen as a likely outcome once the reactor(s) melt(s) down. As with other atomic disasters there is collateral damage. What makes Japan unique? Thanks in advance




posted on Mar, 12 2011 @ 12:25 AM
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reply to post by guessing
 


Please see the post I added here or read up on this page: China Syndrome.

Basically the meltdown will escape containment, melt through the floor and supposedly down through to the core of the earth - meaning - bye bye! But, that is only speculation riddled with huge gobs of fear mongering. Facts are the 'meltdown' would only go 'so far' and then be contained in the earth... Truly though it's better to read the info I posted in other threads and Wiki. I'd re-post here but it's against T&C.

peace



posted on Mar, 12 2011 @ 12:27 AM
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Because of the overheating, a meltdown was possible at one of the reactors, said Ryohei Shiomi, an official with Japan's nuclear safety commission.

But even if there was a meltdown, it wouldn't affect humans outside a six-mile (10-kilometer) radius, he said.

More than 215,000 people were living in 1,350 temporary shelters in five prefectures, or states, the national police agency said. Since the quake, more than 1 million households have not had water, mostly concentrated in northeast.



posted on Mar, 12 2011 @ 12:37 AM
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reply to post by guessing
 


Good question guessing, I am interested in knowing the same answer, however we don't really have anything to go by other than the educated speculation of those tending the devices, and a couple of incidents in the USA involving a meltdown, there was the 3 mile island incident and that plant was shut down for good, but no radiation was leaked out. The other was only a partial meltdown. There was the Chernobyl meltdown, originally killing only 28 people, but as the years have passed the true devastation has been on the land it destroyed and the people still dying and deformed from radiation exposure. Cancer runs rampant even though there is a 'zone of alienation', no one live in. Also that particular plant did not have a containment building like these do. So really there isn't a precedent for this, it will be a wait and watch.



posted on Mar, 12 2011 @ 12:42 AM
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Originally posted by guessing
I would love to hear from anyone with a real clue about what will happen as a likely outcome once the reactor(s) melt(s) down. As with other atomic disasters there is collateral damage. What makes Japan unique? Thanks in advance


May I suggest that you start here as I find it an excellent example of what's to come in the event of a meltdown and could probably give you more answers than I could:




The Chernobyl disaster was a nuclear accident that occurred on 26 April 1986, at the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant in Ukraine (then in the Ukrainian Soviet Socialist Republic, part of the Soviet Union). It is considered the worst nuclear power plant accident in history and is the only level 7 event on the International Nuclear Event Scale. The disaster occurred on 26 April 1986, at reactor number four at the Chernobyl plant, near the town of Pripyat in the Ukrainian Soviet Socialist Republic, during a systems test. A sudden power output surge took place, and when an attempt was made for emergency shutdown, a more extreme spike in power output occurred which led to a reactor vessel rupture and a series of explosions. This event exposed the graphite moderator components of the reactor to air and they ignited; the resulting fire sent a plume of radioactive fallout into the atmosphere and over an extensive geographical area, including Pripyat. The plume drifted over large parts of the western Soviet Union, Eastern Europe, Western Europe, and Northern Europe. Large areas in Ukraine, Belarus, and Russia had to be evacuated, with over 336,000 people resettled. According to official post-Soviet data,[1][2] about 60% of the fallout landed in Belarus.


en.wikipedia.org...



posted on Mar, 12 2011 @ 12:44 AM
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reply to post by silo13
 




Basically the meltdown will escape containment, melt through the floor and supposedly down through to the core of the earth - meaning - bye bye!
Hmmm, well I don't know about that, I studied the mechanics of a nuclear reactor and radiation in high school physics classes, but I don't know much about the results of a meltdown. Wouldn't it be some what similar to the Chernobyl disaster? My guess is radiation would devastate the surrounding areas and the fallout would also be quite deadly within a reasonable radius. The hardest hit area would remain a waste land for decades.

edit on 12-3-2011 by WhizPhiz because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 12 2011 @ 12:49 AM
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www.godlikeproductions.com...

Trinity, Forum Admin for GLP, said this would be worse than nuclear fallout. I believe that this is the China Syndrome. That within 3-10 days, 3 is what most other places are saying, this would travel to the west coast of North America. What is being released as the rods melt has a half life of 30 years I believe.

It wouldn't be good.

There is a link I just read there: hotair.com...

This article is updated to say that mobile electrical units have arrived and they're working to restore the power. The elements in the rods have already been detected, so lets hope they will contain it.



posted on Mar, 12 2011 @ 12:50 AM
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Thanks for the input thus far!. is there to be an explosion? as it seems some have suggested fallout? is this different to the China Syndrome? I read something about jet streams. how far does this radiation become spread? The chernobyl accident reveals radiation as far as Scotland. Thats a concern? Thoughts?



posted on Mar, 12 2011 @ 01:17 AM
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reply to post by WhizPhiz
 

Hmmm, well I don't know about that, I studied the mechanics of a nuclear reactor and radiation in high school physics classes, but I don't know much about the results of a meltdown.


Exactly, which is why I continued my post = (Basically the meltdown will escape containment, melt through the floor and supposedly down through to the core of the earth - meaning - bye bye!) But, that is only speculation riddled with huge gobs of fear mongering. Facts are the 'meltdown' would only go 'so far' and then be contained in the earth...

As for the 'fallout' and that damage? There's really no way of knowing until it happens. Too many factors to consider in to even speculate.

peace



posted on Mar, 12 2011 @ 01:21 AM
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It will not be good, however, the speculation that says it will melt through the earth is not exactly what is expected. There are a number of scenarios, each depends on the type of reactor, whether or not it is in a containment system, how it is cooled, whether or not power outage plays a part and again that totally depends on the type of system. A 'steam bubble' may or most likely is already forming inside the containment, that can escape from the bottom of the containment vessel as it's integrity degrades. That seems to be the scenario that Japan may be expecting. A 6 mile radius is cleared to keep human safe from exposure, that is all that is expected to become contaminated, but again I have to say this really does't have a lot of precedent, mainly because it is the first meltdown of this particular system. I am going with the leak from the bottom and contamination theory, and I forsee not only displacement of a few thousand people who will never go back and get their things, but also water contamination. Oh, and no more power output from this plant.



posted on Mar, 12 2011 @ 01:23 AM
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Shiomi said that even if there was a meltdown, it wouldn't affect humans outside a six-mile (10-kilometer) radius.



MSNBC NEWSSo it's officiall:

Meltdown possible at Japan nuclear plant, official says



Emergencies declared at 5 reactors, leak detected at one; thousands evacuated

An official with Japan's nuclear safety commission says that a meltdown at a nuclear power plant affected by the country's massive earthquake is possible.

Ryohei Shiomi said Saturday that officials were checking whether a meltdown had taken place at the Fukushima Daiichi power plant, which had lost cooling ability in the aftermath of Friday's powerful earthquake.



If the fuel rods melted or are melting, a breach could develop in the nuclear reactor vessel and the question then becomes one of how strong the containment structure around the vessel is and whether it has been undermined by the earthquake, experts said.



posted on Mar, 12 2011 @ 01:25 AM
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well from what is known from china syndrome, what happened at Chernobyl and what is happening now, and by the sound of it it is bad but not that bad, not as bad as Chernobyl was er is, for it is still hot. this is the current up date www3.nhk.or.jp...



posted on Mar, 12 2011 @ 01:56 AM
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I am very glad. Thanks for your insight. It appears that nothing at all is going to happen. What a sigh of relief for everybody. The media loves to capitalise on discomfort. Peace



posted on Mar, 12 2011 @ 02:23 AM
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reply to post by guessing
 


The damage will be significant, and deaths can and most likely will occur, but it is not like they are going to explode and kill off life as we know it. That really doesn't make it better, it remains a disaster of epic proportions, that being said unless you live in the vicinity of it, you are most likely safe.



posted on Mar, 12 2011 @ 02:25 AM
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The reactors in Japan that are of concern are of the light water type, which means that a Chenobyl style meltdown is simply out of the question and any explosion is extremely unlikely. To claim anything else, like it melting through the earth, is absurd and just fear mongering.

What is more likely is the reactor and it's housing will merely be closed off and sealed, left to it's own fate, once they have managed the build up of pressure, usually by releasing gasses which they have been doing when the wind blows out to sea.

It's also worth noting that because Japan has declared an emergency is not indicative of impending doom, it is a formality. By Japanese law, a nuclear emergency must be declared if a cooling system fails, if there is a release of radiation or if there is a dangerous level of water in the reactor.
edit on 12/3/11 by stumason because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 12 2011 @ 02:30 AM
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posted on Mar, 12 2011 @ 02:36 AM
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Besides what we can all assume will happen, its starting to look like we will be finding out...



posted on Mar, 12 2011 @ 05:20 AM
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reply to post by stumason
 


Well, shows what I know!

Large explosion reported at Japanese Reactor - BBC

It is likely this is a steam explosion, rather than the core itself exploding, but it is still one hell of a bang. There is a video of it going "pop" on that BBC link.



posted on Mar, 13 2011 @ 08:31 AM
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The concept of the 'CHINA SYNDROME' is fundamentally flawed and makes no sense


[Note: I know the the probability is that the fuel's heat will dissipate as it spreads out in the soil and rock below the reactor, preventing 'China Syndrome'. But even if this were not the case, there's a huge hole in the theory]

Please correct me if i'm wrong...

Given enough ongoing heat, the fuel could indeed continue to plummet all the way down to the Earth's core...

OK, that makes sense - gravity is pulling the fuel downwards.

However, once it reaches the core, there is NO MORE 'DOWN'....!

For the fuel to continue to China (or wherever is opposite the meltdown location) it would have to then ascend from the core up to China -- from the Core every direction is upwards -- so why on earth would the fuel continue upwards to China.

Besides this gaping hole in the theory, the Earth's core is solid super-heated metal. Could the fuel effect this - would it be of a greater temperature?

The phrase 'The China Syndrome' really needs to be debunked in the MSN.






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