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'Megathrust' moved island 8 feet, sped up Earth's rotation

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posted on Mar, 11 2011 @ 06:57 PM
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Originally posted by solargeddon
reply to post by RadicalRebel
 


So would the Japan quake not have caused a tilt to generate the speed up ?


couldnt say im no expert on the matter, it seems like it would be logical assumption though, but perhaps, whatever "jolting" occured, took place on an east/west trajectory to cause the increase in spin rather than a north/south trajectory to cause a tilt?
edit on 11-3-2011 by RadicalRebel because: (no reason given)
edit on 11-3-2011 by RadicalRebel because: (no reason given)




posted on Mar, 11 2011 @ 07:58 PM
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reply to post by RadicalRebel
 


S&F&


Also, I heard on my local news that the quake moved the earth's axis by about 10cm, like the 2004 one did.



posted on Mar, 11 2011 @ 10:38 PM
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I first heard about this on a local radio station, but thought maybe they were just talking for nothing. I decided to search and found this article.





Japan's quake shifts earth's axis by 25 centimetres By Carmen Chai, Postmedia News March 11, 2011 * Story * Photos ( 1 ) A seismologist points to a seismographic graph showing the magnitude of the earthquake in Japan on a monitor at the British Geological Survey office in Edinburgh, Scotland. A seismologist points to a seismographic graph showing the magnitude of the earthquake in Japan on a monitor at the British Geological Survey office in Edinburgh, Scotland. Photograph by: David Moir, Reuters Initial results out of Italy's National Institute of Geophysics and Volcanology show that the 8.9-magnitude earthquake that rattled Japan Friday shifted the earth's rotation axis by about 25 centimetres. INGV's report, which came hours after the devastating incident, is equivalent to "very, very tiny" changes that won't be seen for centuries, though, Canadian geologists say. Only after centuries would a second be lost as each day is shortened by a millionth of a second, according to University of Toronto geology professor Andrew Miall. "Ten inches sounds like quite a lot when you hold a ruler in front of you. But if you think of it in terms of the earth as a whole, it's absolutely tiny; it's minute," he said. "It's going to make minute changes to the length of a day. It could make very, very tiny changes to the tilt of the earth, which affects the seasons, but these effects are so small, it'd take very precise satellite navigation to pick it up." The earth's rotation will now shift at a different speed because the globe's mass has been redistributed, said Michael Bostock, a University of B.C. earthquake seismology professor. He used an analogy of a figure skater pulling in his or her arms to spin faster because weight has been reorganized. "Ultimately, if you change the length of day, you can change the length of time a given point on earth receives sunlight and doesn't receive sunlight," he said. "But will this affect us in our lifetimes? Absolutely not." The researchers said that while the minuscule change may be completely undetectable, it still illustrates the punch behind the Japan's massive earthquake. Last year, NASA reported that a 8.8-magnitude earthquake that hit Chile shorted the day by 1.26 millionths of a second, according to computer-model calculations. NASA had estimated that the Chilean earthquake shifted the globe's axis by about 10 centimetres, National Geographic reported at the time. INGV, which is Europe's largest research institute to monitor geophysics, said the impact of Friday's event was "much greater" than 2004's notorious Sumatra earthquake, which clocked in at a magnitude of 9.1 Read more: www.canada.com...


www.montrealgazette.com...



posted on Mar, 12 2011 @ 10:30 AM
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reply to post by hawaii50th
 


Thank you!

...As I recall, the details about axis-shift measurements after the 2004 quake tended to dance around a bit - now it all seems to be damage control.

Reports focus on "length of days" and seem to imply that there's no other impact from a shift of axis. Anyone know if that's true? [Not to feed panic, I just like to be fully informed.]



posted on Mar, 12 2011 @ 10:36 AM
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Finnish seismologist Matti Tarvainen says its impossible that Japan island has moved 8 feet. he says it is possible that the GPS location center has moved 2,6m, and he says that its true that rotation axis has sihfted 5-6 cm and it happens in big earthquakes.
He also says that this has cahanged the lenght of day "a few microseconds"

Link in Finnish

www.ts.fi...



posted on Mar, 12 2011 @ 10:36 AM
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I was gonna start a thread, but luckily spotted this, so I'll throw my findings in....

Entire Japan coast shifted 2.4 metres, earth axis moves ten inches


* Earth's axis has reportedly shifted ten inches as a result of the quake, and Japan's coast is said to have permanently shifted 2.4 metres.



Absolutely crazy.



posted on Mar, 12 2011 @ 10:47 AM
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CNN is reporting this now as well:
edition.cnn.com...

How amazing!



posted on Mar, 12 2011 @ 10:57 AM
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Originally posted by thewesticle
CNN is reporting this now as well:
edition.cnn.com...

How amazing!


Intereseting to find they also mention this :



The quake occurred as the Earth's crust ruptured along an area about 250 miles (400 kilometers) long by 100 miles (160 kilometers) wide, as tectonic plates slipped more than 18 meters, said Shengzao Chen, a USGS geophysicist.


I wonder when we will be getting images of this, and now i have to question...
This "Rupture" is immense in lenght and width but, how deep is it?



posted on Mar, 12 2011 @ 11:01 AM
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Entire Japan coast shifted 2.4 metres, earth axis moves ten inches

Read more: www.vancouversun.com...
this can't be too good!



posted on Mar, 12 2011 @ 11:43 AM
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reply to post by Discover
 


I already linked to that 3 posts up.



posted on Mar, 12 2011 @ 03:02 PM
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I really don't think this is anything to worry about, these land mass shifts have happend before, and I do believe this is some form of compensation from the Chile quake last year, as though mother nature is just trying to balance herself back out in my opinion, should anyone find evidence to the contrary, that would be really interesting to look at

edit on 12-3-2011 by solargeddon because: typos grrrr



posted on Mar, 13 2011 @ 03:54 AM
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Originally posted by RadicalRebel
I wonder when we will be getting images of this, and now i have to question...
This "Rupture" is immense in lenght and width but, how deep is it?


It's very simple really Japan sits over a subduction zone, The deep trench off Japan is the edge of this. A subduction zone is where one plate (the Pacific Plate in this case is going UNDER the other plate. Japan sits on the edge of the plate going over top of the Pacific plate


www.glgarcs.net...

Same thing happens at Sumatra


Here is a chart of recent epicenters along the subduction fault. The Trench location is marked



Good picture of the trenches that are the edge of the plate here




The Japan Trench is an oceanic trench, a part of the Pacific Ring of Fire, in the floor of the northern Pacific Ocean off northeast Japan. It extends from the Kuril Islands to the Bonin Islands and is 9,000 m (30,000 ft) at its deepest. It is an extension of the Kuril-Kamchatka Trench to the north and the Izu-Ogasawara Trench to its south. This trench is created when the oceanic Pacific plate subducts beneath the continental Okhotsk Plate. The subduction process causes bending of the downgoing plate, creating a deep-sea trench. Continuing movement on the subduction zone associated with the Japan Trench is one of the main causes of tsunamis and earthquakes in northern Japan.


en.wikipedia.org...
edit on 13-3-2011 by zorgon because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 13 2011 @ 07:08 PM
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Originally posted by zorgon

Originally posted by RadicalRebel
I wonder when we will be getting images of this, and now i have to question...
This "Rupture" is immense in lenght and width but, how deep is it?


It's very simple really Japan sits over a subduction zone, The deep trench off Japan is the edge of this. A subduction zone is where one plate (the Pacific Plate in this case is going UNDER the other plate. Japan sits on the edge of the plate going over top of the Pacific plate
Same thing happens at Sumatra



While i thank you for your time and i appreciate your input i think you misunderstood my question, in my original post one of the articles seems to state that a new trench has opened up and gives approximations to its size in terms of length and width but not depth.
Perhaps i misunderstood the article and it was refering to an expansion oof an already existing trench but my question still reamains, how deep is it?



posted on Mar, 14 2011 @ 04:17 AM
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reply to post by RadicalRebel


Don't see anything about a new trench or it getting deeper. If you find the article let me see it. Current depth is 9,000 metres (29,500 ft) at its deepest point



posted on Mar, 14 2011 @ 05:33 AM
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You have to remember, the earth's rotation and axis were also affected by the 04 indonesia quake, the quake in chile, and last years christchurch quake, if I'm not mistaken. Also, there have been alot of quakes in places we don't normally have them, or not as many. Arkansas, alabama and texas to name a few. On my phone so, no links, sorry. Coincedentally, as I typed this I got an alert on my phone, 4.4 quake in el salvador.



posted on Mar, 14 2011 @ 06:00 AM
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So what is the real time then? over 4billion years of Earthquakes surely time is all wrong.

4 billion years @ (x) amount of seconds of slowing down (+) or( -) mathematical error of human =Y

The there is the amount of fat heads to consider which creates a slurry drag centered ovet ther equator\\\

the only solution is to get up out of bed earlier



posted on Mar, 14 2011 @ 09:45 AM
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Originally posted by zorgon
reply to post by RadicalRebel


Don't see anything about a new trench or it getting deeper. If you find the article let me see it. Current depth is 9,000 metres (29,500 ft) at its deepest point



Ok officially frustrated now, have you read any of this post because the content i refered to was mentioned several times as well as being quoted from one of the atricles i linked to....ill try again...

KVAL.COM



Friday's quake caused a rupture 186 miles long and 93 miles wide in the sea floor 80 miles off the eastern coast of Japan. It happened 15 miles beneath the sea floor.


Clearly it states "caused a rupture" then gives dimensions and the depth at which this occured but neglects to mention the depth of the "rupture" itself.

I understand that this information not be know as of yet, but my question still persists, how deep is it?
How do they even know this happened at all if it occured "15 miles beneath the sea floor"?
edit on 14-3-2011 by RadicalRebel because: (no reason given)
edit on 14-3-2011 by RadicalRebel because: (no reason given)





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