Nuclear emergency as Fukushima cooling system fails after Japan quake!

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posted on Mar, 12 2011 @ 11:50 AM
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reply to post by shadowkhas
 


yes and no. it does literally melt into the earth, but thats when it gets dangerous and has a chance to explode, spewing radioactive contagion into the jetstream and everywhere around it. it would cause a disaster before it got its way to the water, but in the end is almost worse.

i hope they have realized with a situation like this you drop the whole "we cant let everyone know we #ed up thing" bc its just too damn important to have every fact exactly how it is happening, there is too much at risk for them to hide their failure in fear of looking weak. doing that woud be the true weakness, so i hope they arent going about it like chernobyl, for everyones sake




posted on Mar, 12 2011 @ 12:01 PM
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Thank you for closing my thread which had much more important and helpful information and activity, but hey....this was started a couple of hours before mine and rules are rules right?


However considering that continuing to get any word out is what is most important, I digress. Here is the latest that I came across:




posted on Mar, 12 2011 @ 12:08 PM
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reply to post by Newbomb Turk
 


I love how the news is telling everyone

"it is not as bad as it sounds. Everything will be okay. Only small amounts of radiation. Experts are predicting nothing big will happen.

Oh, and by the way . . . the evacuation zone was expanded from 6 miles to 12 miles."


WTF is that?



posted on Mar, 12 2011 @ 12:14 PM
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off-topic post removed to prevent thread-drift


 



posted on Mar, 12 2011 @ 12:21 PM
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Originally posted by GenerationXisMarching
yes and no. it does literally melt into the earth, but thats when it gets dangerous and has a chance to explode, spewing radioactive contagion into the jetstream and everywhere around it. it would cause a disaster before it got its way to the water, but in the end is almost worse.

How would it get directly down into the ground/water? I don't ever recall seeing anything in the Chernobyl incident where anything did "melt into the earth." If you have a link to any info out there to the contrary, I'd like to see it.
(No sarcasm or bitterness intended, I genuinely would.)



posted on Mar, 12 2011 @ 12:27 PM
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reply to post by shadowkhas
 


Link

--So, if it can't explode, what does happen in a nuclear reactor? The answer is what is called a meltdown. When a meltdown occurs in a reactor, the reactor "melts". That is, the temperature rises in the core so much that the fuel rods actually turn to liquid, like ice turns into water when heated. If the core continued to heat, the reactor would get so hot that the steel walls of the core would also melt. In a complete reactor meltdown, the extremely hot (about 2700� Celsius) molten uranium fuel rods would melt through the bottom of the reactor and actually sink about 50 feet into the earth beneath the power plant. The molten uranium would react with groundwater, producing large explosions of radioactive steam and debris that would affect nearby towns and population centers. --
edit on 3/12/2011 by Lemon.Fresh because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 12 2011 @ 12:27 PM
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Originally posted by Lemon.Fresh
reply to post by Newbomb Turk
 


I love how the news is telling everyone

"it is not as bad as it sounds. Everything will be okay. Only small amounts of radiation. Experts are predicting nothing big will happen.

Oh, and by the way . . . the evacuation zone was expanded from 6 miles to 12 miles."


WTF is that?


Quoted for truth


Just one example:

"Alert***Will Nuclear Fallout Hit West Coast of the United States??? Conflicting reports..."



Michio Kaku and Examiner.com have 2 different takes on this story...One good, one not so good.

Link:

www.examiner.com...



posted on Mar, 12 2011 @ 01:03 PM
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Uh oh. I hope nothing tragic will come of this... But I always fear the worst
edit on 12-3-2011 by Solar.Absolution because: to add a little more.



posted on Mar, 12 2011 @ 01:17 PM
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Originally posted by Lemon.Fresh
reply to post by shadowkhas
 


Link

--So, if it can't explode, what does happen in a nuclear reactor? The answer is what is called a meltdown. When a meltdown occurs in a reactor, the reactor "melts". That is, the temperature rises in the core so much that the fuel rods actually turn to liquid, like ice turns into water when heated. If the core continued to heat, the reactor would get so hot that the steel walls of the core would also melt. In a complete reactor meltdown, the extremely hot (about 2700� Celsius) molten uranium fuel rods would melt through the bottom of the reactor and actually sink about 50 feet into the earth beneath the power plant. The molten uranium would react with groundwater, producing large explosions of radioactive steam and debris that would affect nearby towns and population centers. --
edit on 3/12/2011 by Lemon.Fresh because: (no reason given)

Interesting. Thank you!



posted on Mar, 12 2011 @ 01:39 PM
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Dr. Michio Kaku's take on the incident. He compares this to Chernobyl, in that the reactor has experienced the same type potential damage, which could release radioactive gas, aka China Syndrome. Man I hope they get this contained. Blessings to those that have suffered....


spec



posted on Mar, 12 2011 @ 02:23 PM
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reply to post by GenerationXisMarching
 


I am wondering if this radiation from a complete melt down, and assuming there is some fail safe containment failer also, …..could this radiation actually make it to the “jet stream”? this would be a ground level explosion, is that enough to push radiation up to 23,000+feet?

I am doubtful that the western united states would get fallout (I am no expert), look up jet streams. Does seem like a scary scenario .
Tokyo to San Francisco is 5,133 miles.



posted on Mar, 12 2011 @ 02:28 PM
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OK, I found these images/footage on the TBS news website, it's the best close-up view of the damage to the building that I have seen so far.

edit on 12-3-2011 by curioustype because: Still working out video embed procedure...



posted on Mar, 12 2011 @ 02:31 PM
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reply to post by curioustype
 


OK - so now everyone wants to see what the inside looks like...and what the status of the core/fuel rods is.



posted on Mar, 12 2011 @ 02:39 PM
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forgive me if this was already posted, but got this from prisonplanet.com www.infowars.com...

This is beyond anything I expected. And, if there is some sort of radioactive cloud, I'm in Los Angeles..



posted on Mar, 12 2011 @ 02:43 PM
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i just pulled this up and wondered if this is just a theory or a fact .The 'China Syndrome' refers to the most drastically severe meltdown a nuclear reactor could possibly achieve. In this case, the reactor would reach the highest level of supercriticality for a sustained period of time, resulting in the melting of its support infrastructure. The uranium in the core would behave in a similar manner to a delta-class fire, self-sustaining temperatures in excess of 2000°C. Since these temperatures would melt all materials around it, the reactor would sink due to gravity, effectively boring a hole through the reactor compartment's floor



posted on Mar, 12 2011 @ 03:06 PM
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I knew that nuclear power was bad news. Very, very bad news. I think we should shut down EVERY nuclear power plant left - NOW! What's doing without the power produced compared to these risks???

On the west coast of CA there is the San Onofre power plant - sitting right on the beach! A good tsunami would take it out, even. Let alone that it's sitting virtually on the San Andreas fault!

We must stop the insanity of nuclear power!



posted on Mar, 12 2011 @ 03:20 PM
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reply to post by Amaterasu
 


I certainly think that we ought to review the safety guidelines for nuclear power in the wake of this.

If they do manage to contain and avoid a disastrous meltdown (which I think is very possible) the nuclear industry will be making a lot of noise about how all of Japans reactors surviving such a pwerful natural disaster is a big PASS for nuclear safety and sustainability.

However, we must remember how close this came to something worse, and it reminds me of warnings a fellow ATSer posted some time back about how vulnerable (US) nuclear power plants may be to other natural disasters - also I think highlighting cooling system/control system damage - but from say mega-eruption deep ash-falls...?



posted on Mar, 12 2011 @ 03:32 PM
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Reuters: The emergency cooling system is no longer functioning at the Fukushima No. 3 reactor, an official from Japan's Nuclear and Industrial Safety Agency has told journalists.



Hmm, No. 3 now struggling - I hope the temp got down way low - doesn't sopund greatly reassuring?



posted on Mar, 12 2011 @ 03:44 PM
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This is so devastating I'm so baffled about all of this! We never seem to learn that we could already have alternative free energy years ago. And now the whole world can see that we learned nothing from the Chernobyl accident, Now we can wait and see how reactor number three will go down! I know the Japanese are not to blame I hope God will have mercy to these people!



posted on Mar, 12 2011 @ 03:51 PM
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Originally posted by curioustype
reply to post by Amaterasu
 


I certainly think that we ought to review the safety guidelines for nuclear power in the wake of this.

If they do manage to contain and avoid a disastrous meltdown (which I think is very possible) the nuclear industry will be making a lot of noise about how all of Japans reactors surviving such a pwerful natural disaster is a big PASS for nuclear safety and sustainability.

However, we must remember how close this came to something worse, and it reminds me of warnings a fellow ATSer posted some time back about how vulnerable (US) nuclear power plants may be to other natural disasters - also I think highlighting cooling system/control system damage - but from say mega-eruption deep ash-falls...?


Given ANY leakage of radioactivity...I can't see justifying this poison on our planet. The plenum (opposite of vacuum) has more energy than we can conceive and methods of extraction are hidden to protect the power of the PTB. Let's release this to the public and get rid of such dangerous ways of extracting (highly) entropic forms.

You're right, though... Unless this becomes the catastrophe it looks like it's shaping up to be, the PTB will laud the "safety" of nuclear energy, ignoring the fact that all this radiation has (already) been released into the environment. Radioactivity = cancer = sick = money for the pharmies, doctors & hospitals.





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