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Japan declares 'nuclear emergency' after quake

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posted on Jun, 8 2011 @ 08:51 PM
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Originally posted by Wertwog

If the cap (and Elvis) hasn't left the building where do you think it is?
edit on 8-6-2011 by Wertwog because: (no reason given)

One of the reasons it was shot down as having exited 3 was because there was no heat signature or radiation outside the buildings of that significance that would have shown up. Since there was no real heat signature that size inside 3 as well I think its buried under the debris with the fuel crane on top of it. It may or may not be on top of the reactor, and it may be in pieces, but once again Im just flappin and speculating.

Sad thing is we may never know the truth if the plant goes critical somewhere and they have to abort, leaving the plant on its on. I shudder at the thought but it's a very real possibilty. In fact, if they put this up at Vegas, the odds would be not good. All it takes is an aftershock that releases either of the SFPs in 3 and 4, or one of the corium masses that are now in exit mode hitting a pocket of water, or........this list goes on. Thats why I am sick to death with the response of our government, other governments, the MSM, the talking heads, the CEOs playing things down and not doing everything they can to monitor, test, release data, warn of contamination when its happening and not a month later. Its all very sick and not right.




posted on Jun, 9 2011 @ 12:05 AM
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In case this hasn't been posted,
Start digging a big hole and make it comfortable!




posted on Jun, 9 2011 @ 12:05 AM
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It seems that the Fukushima Radiation in the Pacific Research Cruise organised by the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institute has clammed up tight. There have been no daily Reports since the 6th June when they were at 34.07N, 145.55W. I suppose they are so busy taking readings perhaps that doing a small write-up for the public is a little beyond them.

Does anyone have any contacts in the University of Hawaii please?
If so, maybe send them an email them asking where is the information or what is happening.

The science vessel belongs to them and I wondered if we can get any information from there as to what is going on.



posted on Jun, 9 2011 @ 12:12 AM
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Originally posted by kdog1982

Originally posted by NOMOREFEDRESERVE
reply to post by kdog1982
 


The real story will never come out, NEVER. The real story of every war this country has been in has never come out in public. And this is another war, 21st century style. Us useless eaters are the enemy. Protocols of the Learned Elders of Zion is what we are living and dieing through.



What's our alternative?
Information spread to the populous,falling to deaf ears?
Rebellion,only to be squashed?
If there is a way,I'm all for it.
We are just cattle to be prodded and used as food for the rich and powerful.
What is the answer?

My answer is to be as informed as possible.Spread the word to as many
who will listen.
Protect myself and family.
Enjoy life as we know it for as long as we can.
Survive.
Rage against the dying of the light.
I think that is all we can do.


edit on 8-6-2011 by kdog1982 because: (no reason given)


I wish I had a better answer. Our hands are pretty well tied. Sounds like you got it together though. More people are waking up, do what you can. Thanks for your effort.



posted on Jun, 9 2011 @ 12:34 AM
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reply to post by NOMOREFEDRESERVE
 


Thank you.
I wish I had a better answer also.



posted on Jun, 9 2011 @ 12:59 AM
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I think one answer is to keep plugging away at the wall of silence/secrecy/disinfo. Send emails to politicians, scientists, chief executives, managers, everyone you can think of. Try and get them to respond, to think about what they are part of.

Some people have morals, it is not everyone who wants the worlds population to die and bringing it all down to a personal level may work against some people, to make them realise that their sons, daughters, grandchildren are as vulnerable as the rest of us.

It is only the top illuminati who do not have emotions and work towards the Big Final Agenda, and so people further down who know little bits of the Big Plan are a weak point and available for persuasion.

Information is the key to unlock the door and so finding the information as we are so good at here, is a useful and productive pasttime. However, what we need is a collation tool. One that collates all of the individual pieces of data into a big picture. That is our Achilles Heel at the moment - we dont have that. The security services have spent many millions on this as they know how important piecing all the information together is to the overall picture.



posted on Jun, 9 2011 @ 05:10 AM
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Large Release of Steam/Smoke Unit 3 - Video



Lucas captured this...

news.lucaswhitefieldhixson.com...

....sigh....

- Purple Chive



posted on Jun, 9 2011 @ 09:35 AM
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reply to post by Purplechive
 


The following is an article written by Linda Solomon..

"Will Canada take Fukushima's radioactive rods?

Link www.vancouverobserver.com...

The decommissioning of the Fukushima 1 nuclear plant is delayed by a single problem: Where to dispose of the uranium fuel rods, writes Yoichi Shimatsu, a Hong Kong-based environmental writer and former editor of the Japan Times Weekly. Shimatsu poses the question in Global Research, adding that "many of those rods are extremely radioactive and partially melted, and some contain highly lethal plutonium."

She explains why the United States' obligation to store Japan's uranium waste has been overcome by Americans' opposition to providing storage. She names Canada as one of the "more logical choices" for disposing the rods due to its size and sparse population. She also indicates that past backroom uranium deals may have left Canadian politicians susceptible both to bribes and leverage Japan could exert by threatening to name who took graft. She writes that:

...Canadian politicians are bound to opportunistically oppose the return of depleted uranium since any shipments from Fukushima would be met by a massive turnout of "not-in-my-backyard" protesters. The only way for Tokyo to convince the local politicos to go along quietly is by threatening to publish an online list of the bribe-takers in parliament who had earlier backed uranium mining on behalf of the Japanese interests.

She goes on to say that in addition to the fissile fuel inside the plant's six reactors, more than 7 tons of spent rods must be removed from Fukushima. Japan must find a permanent burial ground for the rods before they can bury the plant beneath concrete. Japan's unstable earth makes the country itself an "unsuitable" storage site.
Shimatsu also gives an in-depth explanation of why China won't be the site. She says Japan has been monitoring Chinese radioactive leaks for years and that China has kept this information secret from the public. Japan could did talk with China about storing the material, she says. But the plan was scrapped, because of "the skittishness of the ordinary Chinese citizen."
A nuclear disposal deal would require trucks loaded with radioactive cargo to roll through a densely populated port, perhaps Tianjin or Ningbo, in the dead of night. There is no way that secret shipments wouldn't be spotted by locals with smart phones, triggering a mass exodus from every city, town and village along the route to the dumping grounds in China's far west. Thus, the skittishness of the ordinary Chinese citizen knocked out the easiest of nefarious plans.
She also says that Tokyo Electric Power Company (Tepco) has allocated 1 trillion yen ($12 billion) in funds for nuclear waste disposal. Areva, the French nuclear monopoly, has teamed up with Tepco to find an overseas storage site. So far, the Tepco-Areva team have quietly contacted three Asian countries - Kazakhstan, China and Mongolia -- to set up a center for "reprocessing", a euphemism for nuclear dump site.
She concludes that Mongolia may be the final resting place of the hazardous materials.

Illusory, shortsighted greed will surely triumph in Mongolia, and that leaves a question of moral accountability for the rest of us. Will the world community feel remorse for dumping its nuclear mess onto an ancient culture that invented boiled mutton, fermented mare's milk and Genghis Khan? For guilt-ridden diplomats from Tokyo and Washington wheedling the dirty deal in Ulan Bator, here's the rebuttal: Did the national hero, the Great Khan, ever shed any tears or feel pangs of guilt? There's no need for soul-searching. A solution is at hand"

End of article

She said it best

"She also indicates that past backroom uranium deals may have left Canadian politicians susceptible both to bribes and leverage Japan could exert by threatening to name who took graft."
edit on 9-6-2011 by VisionsOfMann because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 9 2011 @ 10:36 AM
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reply to post by Purplechive
 


That can't be good. And like other times, flashes of light from ground level and these flashes are consistently occurring in tandem with steam/smoke expulsions. People speculated arc welding or something akin when they first started couple weeks ago, but a longtime welder at another forum said 'no way'. Cant remember why though.

Time to check the wind directions again.



posted on Jun, 9 2011 @ 10:41 AM
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reply to post by zworld
 


just thinking aloud now, but if the corium is lying in the water underneath the reactors, slowly burning through the concrete, isn't all this steam what we would expect???



posted on Jun, 9 2011 @ 12:50 PM
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reply to post by VisionsOfMann
 


Japan won't store waste that has cooled down a bit, but will operate 54 reactors in much more dangerous states than stored waste, whilst next to the sea. On a fault line. On sandstone.

Not in my backyard it sounds like.



posted on Jun, 9 2011 @ 03:06 PM
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Didn't see this posted...

mdn.mainichi.jp...

Strontium contamination found outside nuclear crisis exclusion zone

Radioactive strontium 89 and strontium 90 has been detected in 11 locations outside the 20-kilometer exclusion zone around the crisis-stricken Fukushima No. 1 Nuclear Power Plant, the government announced June 8.

The radioactive isotopes of strontium are thought to cause bone cancer and leukemia. However, the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology has said the amounts detected are miniscule, and present no threat to human health.

The science ministry took soil samples in areas around the Fukushima plant from late March through early May. The highest strontium contamination outside the exclusion zone was found 29 kilometers west northwest of the plant in the town of Namie, with 1,500 becquerels of radiation from strontium 89, and 250 becquerels from strontium 90 per 1 kilogram of soil.

The second-highest contamination was found 36 kilometers northwest of the plant in the village of Iitate, with 1,100 becquerels of strontium 89, and 120 of strontium 90. The furthest from the plant strontium was detected was 62 kilometers away in the city of Fukushima, which registered 54 becquerels of strontium 89 and 7.7 becquerels of strontium 90.

The science ministry had previously detected strontium in three locations outside the 30-kilometer indoor standby order zone, and in four locations inside the exclusion zone.



posted on Jun, 9 2011 @ 03:18 PM
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And this one... More at the link..

www.scientificamerican.com...

Analysis: Risks Too Great for Full Japan Nuclear Shutdown

Economic risks are too high for Japan to pull the plug on its 54 nuclear plants next year despite intense public pressure on Tokyo to cut reliance on atomic power in favor of other clean energy sources.
| June 9, 2011

Share Email Print
By Chikako Mogi

TOKYO (Reuters) - Economic risks are too high for Japan to pull the plug on its 54 nuclear plants next year despite intense public pressure on Tokyo to cut reliance on atomic power in favor of other clean energy sources.

Unless Tokyo overrides resistance from local officials, orders reactor restarts and faces down public disapproval, by April next year Japan's last plant would shut for maintenance and leave the country with no nuclear power.

A massive earthquake in March crippled reactors, sparked the world's worst nuclear disaster in 25 years and left Japan struggling to supply homes and industry with power as nuclear capacity utilization fell to 36 percent.

Three months later, the shortage is worsening as reactors are switched off one by one. Mindful of the growing public concern about safety standards, regional bureaucrats are delaying the restart of reactors after scheduled maintenance until tighter safety measures are implemented.

Analysts doubt the government would allow the situation to develop into a full shutdown, but a partial shutdown would hurt.

"The government probably feels the stakes are too big, and that's why I don't believe all plants will be shut down by next year," said Masamichi Adachi, senior economist at JPMorgan in Tokyo.

"Some plants could be shut down. It is likely manufacturing would take a hit and we would have to pay higher costs as power companies switch to thermal power."

Industry would face more power rationing and the need for energy imports levy a high price on the world's third-largest economy, as Japan lacks the electricity generation capacity to substitute for the nuclear fleet.

"I am concerned," Katsuya Okada, the No. 2 of the ruling Democratic Party, said at a news conference.

"It is clear that electricity supply will not be sufficient... if (all reactors) are completely halted. It is necessary to resume operations of reactors that have finished their regular inspections."

A total shutdown could spread beyond Japan and hurt the global economy, said Neil Beveridge, an analyst with Bernstein Research in Hong Kong.

"It would really stall the recovery next year, which would be a major impact in Japan, a major impact globally," he said.

Industry would leave Japan rather than face long-term power shortages, analysts warn.

"There would be a 'hollowing out' of industries," said Taisuke Abiru, a research fellow for energy policy at think tank Tokyo Foundation.

"Companies will put up with (power shortages) this summer, but if this goes on next year and beyond, they won't be able to come up with business plans. That's the worst-case scenario that needs to be avoided and the trade ministry understands this."

Tokyo may be able to overcome the problem by sending a clear signal that plans to address safety concerns are in place. This may still be insufficient to overcome public distrust as problems at the crippled plant continue, and after embattled Prime Minister Naoto Kan ordered the surprise shutdown of the Hamaoka nuclear plant in May.

Without nuclear power, Japan would be almost totally dependent on imported fuel to meet energy needs. Japan already faces imported fuel costs equivalent to about 3 percent of its annual GDP and dependency on international supplies at about 80 percent.

The cost in additional fuel imports for the loss of energy generated by nuclear power is estimated at as much as 3 trillion yen ($37.5 billion), according to trade ministry officials.

THERMAL SPARE CAPACITY

Japan lacks capacity to supply demand without nuclear reactors.

Even if power plants raised utilization rates to about 70 percent at thermal plants, above current levels, they could only compensate for about 60 percent of a complete nuclear shutdown in 2011, the Japan Center for Economic Research said in a report in June.

Renewable energy sources account for a marginal proportion of Japan's power supply, so the quickest and cleanest way to fill the nuclear gap is to install as many gas turbines as possible, analysts say.

To feed them, and higher utilization at existing plants, Japan would have to import even more liquefied natural gas (LNG). It is already the world's largest LNG importer, buying 70 million tones in 2010, and has already agreed to buy millions of tones more this year as it ramps up gas-fired plants.

It would take years to build the plants needed to compensate for the nuclear outages and to prepare the infrastructure to feed them.

"I doubt that the country will be able to meet peak demand in the summer and the winter with all the nuclear off-line," said Andy Flower, a UK-based LNG analyst. It was unclear if terminals could import the number of cargoes needed to compensate for a nuclear shutdown, he said.

Barclays Capital analysts say that if Japan were to use gas alone to compensate for a full nuclear shutdown, it would consume 3.5 billion cubic feet per day more. That's an increase of over 37 percent from 2010 demand, according to Reuters' calculations based on annual data from BP.



posted on Jun, 9 2011 @ 03:31 PM
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Hey, gang. I would like you guys to settle a disagreement, I am having with another friend, who is also following this mess.Tepco has released these pictures of repair work, to shore up the fuel pool at #4. .A gent over at physics forums, commented, that they do not show the ceiling and floor, in these pictures. That got me to thinking. Reactor #4 is now a concrete frame holding a pool. We see through the walls all the time. These walls not only don't have any holes, they have no chunks of concrete missing, or burn marks. If Tepco told me these were pics of #5, or #2, I might believe it. But #4 ? I don't buy it. Please settle this. Oh yeah, Great job, gang ! www.tepco.co.jp...



posted on Jun, 9 2011 @ 03:57 PM
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reply to post by kdog1982
 


Garbage!

Anything from GLP usually is.


There is no set date when criticality will hit, let alone one where we have very little information about because TEPCO lies to everyone.

The spent fuel pool is a worry but not as much as the actual cores. I keep hearing people (not you) saying that it is just as big as the cores themselves but how it that possible? If that was the case then why would they take the rods out in the first place?

The spent fuel is depleted of enriched Uranium, the ones that causes fission, meaning it needs to be in much bigger quantities to ever reach a critical state. If possible it will start mixing with the elements around it is melting and it will dilute the mixture even more.

Chernobyl had spent fuel pools as well, that is what they sent the people on the roof for. They had to, by hand, shove all the spend fuel rods back into the hole so they could seal the reactor. They were literally holding spent fuel rods at the end of a shovel.

We are approaching the third month of this disaster and nothing has changed from within the first 16 hours of the disaster, Chernobyl stopped fissioning after they dumped a ton of boron/sand mixture on top of the exposed reactor core, why Japan never tried this is beyond me. Maybe it is because they had no crack in the reactor like Chernobyl did, making it harder to get the mixture into the core, I'm not too sure, as everything is so secret.

All I know is TEPCO is one corrupt company that hides the truth from the people, and the Japanese government is just as bad as they let them do this and are more than likely in bed with them.

Pathetic, such a dangerous process hidden by corruption, greed and profit. Sounds like a great combination, wonder why it never worked... Let's keep trying though, because as Albert Einstein said "The definition of insanity is doing the same thing over and over again expecting a different result."

That sums up our species.

Pred...



posted on Jun, 9 2011 @ 05:33 PM
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Originally posted by Aircooled
Hey, gang. I would like you guys to settle a disagreement, I am having with another friend, who is also following this mess.Tepco has released these pictures of repair work, to shore up the fuel pool at #4. .A gent over at physics forums, commented, that they do not show the ceiling and floor, in these pictures. That got me to thinking. Reactor #4 is now a concrete frame holding a pool. We see through the walls all the time. These walls not only don't have any holes, they have no chunks of concrete missing, or burn marks. If Tepco told me these were pics of #5, or #2, I might believe it. But #4 ? I don't buy it. Please settle this. Oh yeah, Great job, gang ! www.tepco.co.jp...


The problem is the position of the underside of the SFP. Its not on the outer side where most of the damage appears to have occurred.




There are also images of the inner part reactor unit 4 which include the base of the SFP.







posted on Jun, 9 2011 @ 05:41 PM
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reply to post by zworld
 


The analysis we did clearly showed that the lid was blown off and likely dropped through the roof of the turbine building. The reason there is no hotspot in the RPV of #3 was it is believed that much of the fuel aerosolized in the force of the detonation (which was nuclear). Whatever remains fell to the bottom of the RPV and was covered in debris, the RPV now being 'open air'. Since then, some of this remaining fuel seems to have formed a mass and is/has exited the RPV. We aren't certain how large this corium mass is, but we're fairly sure at this point it's breached the secondary containment (concrete floor), which in this GE M1 BWR design apparently had a graphite layer we saw certain indications had been burning off - black smoke etc. There is little doubt that if it has not already in time the floor will not be enough to stop the masses given the temperatures involved. We are now in a waiting game until all the corium masses in all 3 reactors breach this final barrier and connect with groundwater.

From what I understand, at this point it is almost inevitable that this will occur because the masses are exceeding the capacity of any cooling abilities. Neutron poisons need to penetrate the mass (and can't), and water will only cool the external surfaces of the mass, not the interior where the active fissioning is taking place. Cooling can have little effect now. My one hope is the the secondary containment floors were designed with ridges and gaps to separate the corium in the event something like this happened. If the corium can be separated into smaller blobs it would be easier to cool, but even then it is only a matter of time before it burned through this last containment/floor and form a solid mass in the earth. Of course, we discussed at great length a while back about something going in and cutting it up etc etc and it's all impossible due to the radiation, heat and phsycial environment of those reactor spaces right now. It will kill anything living in seconds and burn through any metals. Corium has a very hard external casing (like a shell) that is impossible to penetrate with anything humans have around. We've made ourselves the ultimate blob monster!

European scientists have known for some time from the fissile materials are being ejected as far away as Europe that active fissioning is occurring on the site at all 3 reactors. These elements cannot exist without fission and do not exist in nature. There is little doubt that we're seeing short criticalities stopping and starting. The huffing and puffing we have seen for weeks now. Arnie mentioned we are now breathing in "hot particles" (he means alpha emitters) to the tune of 5 - 10 per day (Westcoast and Japan). If we see a criticality event, the site is abandoned, or god forbid these AHoles chain... I hate to say it but that don't look good for the human race or any other race on this big 'ole rock.

We are in unknown territory outside of known nuclear physics. Everything is conjecture now. Let's face it. If this was intentional they didn't mean for it to be small. Fukushima was chosen for it's perfect potential FUBAR ratio. They wanted this to be big with maximum global impact. How this is not perfectly obvious to people once you know just the basic facts is beyond me.

This is a game changer. The human race is on a threshold and will not be the same. I know death is coming sooner than I wanted and will love my people (and dogdaughter) all the more in the time we have.



posted on Jun, 9 2011 @ 05:46 PM
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reply to post by Wertwog
 


I agree , this is the end of the entire world , as once the people all become radiated and die, the other reactors all over the planet will go into meltdown as no one will be there to keep them cool. Nuclear complete anhialation of all life on the planet is on the way. This is the big one.



posted on Jun, 9 2011 @ 06:02 PM
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Originally posted by Aircooled
Hey, gang. I would like you guys to settle a disagreement, I am having with another friend, who is also following this mess.Tepco has released these pictures of repair work, to shore up the fuel pool at #4. .A gent over at physics forums, commented, that they do not show the ceiling and floor, in these pictures. That got me to thinking. Reactor #4 is now a concrete frame holding a pool. We see through the walls all the time. These walls not only don't have any holes, they have no chunks of concrete missing, or burn marks. If Tepco told me these were pics of #5, or #2, I might believe it. But #4 ? I don't buy it. Please settle this. Oh yeah, Great job, gang ! www.tepco.co.jp...


Personal opinion, these pics were taken at the factory where they were made, showing TEPCO what they would look like once installed. I've seen these types of promo shots before on products that we have purchased.

There is no way those pics were taken in any of the reactor buildings in my opinion.



posted on Jun, 9 2011 @ 06:04 PM
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Originally posted by Wertwog
reply to post by zworld
 


The analysis we did clearly showed that the lid was blown off and likely dropped through the roof of the turbine building. The reason there is no hotspot in the RPV of #3 was it is believed that much of the fuel aerosolized in the force of the detonation (which was nuclear). Whatever remains fell to the bottom of the RPV and was covered in debris, the RPV now being 'open air'. Since then, some of this remaining fuel seems to have formed a mass and is/has exited the RPV. We aren't certain how large this corium mass is, but we're fairly sure at this point it's breached the secondary containment (concrete floor), which in this GE M1 BWR design apparently had a graphite layer we saw certain indications had been burning off - black smoke etc. There is little doubt that if it has not already in time the floor will not be enough to stop the masses given the temperatures involved. We are now in a waiting game until all the corium masses in all 3 reactors breach this final barrier and connect with groundwater.

From what I understand, at this point it is almost inevitable that this will occur because the masses are exceeding the capacity of any cooling abilities. Neutron poisons need to penetrate the mass (and can't), and water will only cool the external surfaces of the mass, not the interior where the active fissioning is taking place. Cooling can have little effect now. My one hope is the the secondary containment floors were designed with ridges and gaps to separate the corium in the event something like this happened. If the corium can be separated into smaller blobs it would be easier to cool, but even then it is only a matter of time before it burned through this last containment/floor and form a solid mass in the earth. Of course, we discussed at great length a while back about something going in and cutting it up etc etc and it's all impossible due to the radiation, heat and phsycial environment of those reactor spaces right now. It will kill anything living in seconds and burn through any metals. Corium has a very hard external casing (like a shell) that is impossible to penetrate with anything humans have around. We've made ourselves the ultimate blob monster!

European scientists have known for some time from the fissile materials are being ejected as far away as Europe that active fissioning is occurring on the site at all 3 reactors. These elements cannot exist without fission and do not exist in nature. There is little doubt that we're seeing short criticalities stopping and starting. The huffing and puffing we have seen for weeks now. Arnie mentioned we are now breathing in "hot particles" (he means alpha emitters) to the tune of 5 - 10 per day (Westcoast and Japan). If we see a criticality event, the site is abandoned, or god forbid these AHoles chain... I hate to say it but that don't look good for the human race or any other race on this big 'ole rock.

We are in unknown territory outside of known nuclear physics. Everything is conjecture now. Let's face it. If this was intentional they didn't mean for it to be small. Fukushima was chosen for it's perfect potential FUBAR ratio. They wanted this to be big with maximum global impact. How this is not perfectly obvious to people once you know just the basic facts is beyond me.

This is a game changer. The human race is on a threshold and will not be the same. I know death is coming sooner than I wanted and will love my people (and dogdaughter) all the more in the time we have.


Sorry, no it was proven that the Spent Fuel Pool exploded. There is no way the reactor exploded, the roof girders over the reactor are still in place.

Here is the proof...



edit on 9-6-2011 by matadoor because: Placing the proof for all to see, and the un-informed to debate.




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