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Japan declares 'nuclear emergency' after quake

page: 912.htm
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posted on Jun, 2 2011 @ 06:52 PM
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reply to post by VisionsOfMann
 


Originally posted by VisionsOfMann
reply to post by Purplechive
 


Folks, take a look at this clip PC captured. Specifically, go into the clip at about 1:48, look at the Tepco side (left capture) and take a real close look at the lower right corner of Unit 4. You will notice a couple of very bright flashes. Look closely where the tree line is against Unit 4, it's quite a bright spot.

Maybe another "oxygen tank"!!! Right!! Anyway, I think Purple captured something meaningfull!!

www.youtube.com...


Yes, I can see it. A very bright flash right where you have pointed at.

What we have there is an event screaming out for an explanation. Need some analysis by the various specialist tech-heads on this thread, please.




posted on Jun, 2 2011 @ 07:02 PM
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Oh sh1t.... at 9am Japan time I cannot see any of the buildings for smoke!



posted on Jun, 2 2011 @ 07:04 PM
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Fukushima at sunrise



Fukushima now - is it sea fog, steam, or smoke?




posted on Jun, 2 2011 @ 07:08 PM
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Originally posted by Tallone
reply to post by VisionsOfMann
 


Originally posted by VisionsOfMann
reply to post by Purplechive
 


Folks, take a look at this clip PC captured. Specifically, go into the clip at about 1:48, look at the Tepco side (left capture) and take a real close look at the lower right corner of Unit 4. You will notice a couple of very bright flashes. Look closely where the tree line is against Unit 4, it's quite a bright spot.

Maybe another "oxygen tank"!!! Right!! Anyway, I think Purple captured something meaningfull!!

www.youtube.com...


Yes, I can see it. A very bright flash right where you have pointed at.

What we have there is an event screaming out for an explanation. Need some analysis by the various specialist tech-heads on this thread, please.


I have been trying to work out what it could have been. The only thing that comes to mind is arc welding?

Seems to have been next to reactor 4 - could have something to do with the explosion the other day?

Something strange was happening - have to see what happens tonight - if the smoke clears!



posted on Jun, 2 2011 @ 07:22 PM
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reply to post by imlite
 


Happy thoughts,

I think its fog, watched it roll in on the TBS cam, then the Tepco cam fogged up too. Been watching for about an hour now and both cams went from blue skies to grey fog in about 10 mins.

There was just another earthquake too, at about 9.10am Japan time according to the Tepco cam, all the birds went nuts on the TBS cam then the whole place shook like mad......it was almost if they knew it was coming.

Whilst the TBS was capturing the noise of the quake the Tepco cam was shaking so I believe the Tepco cam is actually live now (wasn't so sure before what with all their lies!).

SS



posted on Jun, 2 2011 @ 07:29 PM
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A French independent radioactivity watchdog has found radiation in Fukushima Prefecture 60 times higher than the annual reference level for ordinary people recommended by an international commission.

www3.nhk.or.jp...



posted on Jun, 2 2011 @ 07:32 PM
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reply to post by StonedSheep
 


Crikey: USGS showing that quake as 6.3 right on the plate boundary. USGS



posted on Jun, 2 2011 @ 08:49 PM
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Not to be alarmist or anything, but....here is some scary math.

Fukushima Could Kill 920 Million People




Just in case you ever wonder about the worst-case scenario at Fukushima…

If all the plutonium at Fukushima burns and disperses into the atmosphere, a LOW ESTIMATE of the death-toll adds up to about 920,000,000 people, and that’s applying the nuclear industry’s own “myth-busting” refutation of Ralph Nader’s “alarmist” arithmetic.

A commonly cited quote by Ralph Nader, states that a pound of plutonium dust spread into the atmosphere would be enough to kill 8 billion people. However, the math shows that one pound of plutonium could kill no more than 2 million people by inhalation. This makes the toxicity of plutonium roughly equivalent with that of nerve gas.

And isn’t that soothing!

Plutonium is almost the same as oatmeal!

It’s only as toxic as nerve gas!

But there’s a heck of a lot of that plutonium-oatmeal stored at Fukushima!

The 1,458 tons of plutonium held as “Unirradiated new fuel at reactor sites etc.” includes 210 kg at Fukushima I-3 (TEPCO).

210 kilograms is about 460 pounds, and even if we accept the low-ball estimate of 2,000,000 fatalities per pound, that’s still an awful lot of people!

460 X 2000000 = 920,000,000 people.
Source

Also, radiation safety limits going up in Japan?


The Nuclear Safety Commission headed by Haruki "Detarame ('Falsehood'; his cute nickname by the irate Japanese citizens)" Madarame has proposed that the Japanese government loosen the provisional safety limits for foods, as the Fukushima nuclear disaster continues.

(Oh by the way, did you know the provisional safety numbers for radioactive materials in foods, milk and drinking water were decided on the basis of 5 millisieverts per year radiation exposure?)

On June 2, the Nuclear Safety Commission under the Cabinet Office indicated the need for revising the provisional safety limits for the radioactive materials in foods and drinking water. Japan's Food Safety Law does not have the formal safety standards for radioactive materials. After the Fukushima I Nuke Plant accident, the Japanese government has set provisional safety limits for radioactive materials for each food item so that the total radiation [from food and water?] would be below 5 millisieverts per year. This number is the most strict one among the numbers recommended by the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) as the government guidelines to restrict the shipment [of the food items]. However, as the Fukushima accident continues, some experts have voiced concern that [these provisional numbers] do not fit the actual situation [i.e. they are too low]. Commissioner Seiji Shiroya spoke in the ad-hoc meeting of the Commission on June 2 that "It is not desirable to use the provisional numbers as if they were set in stone."


Radiation data is also available on Tokyo at EX-SKF


edit on 2-6-2011 by DancedWithWolves because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 2 2011 @ 09:53 PM
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Had a senior moment, ask a question re
the 6.3 quake but found my answer, right
in front of me as usual. Some interesting
posts everyone

edit on 2-6-2011 by crazydaisy because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 2 2011 @ 11:00 PM
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Since the Fukushima Disaster happened almost three months ago, and Japan doesn't want to say crap about the status regardless of how their failed nuclear plants affect the health of the rest of the world...is it okay to start cracking jokes about Fukushima now?

Just saying.



posted on Jun, 2 2011 @ 11:06 PM
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Maybe TEPCO can fill the leaking reactors by dumping a few tons of Jiffy Pop microwavable popcorn in them. The popcorn will pop instantly and hopefully soak up all of the radioactive water and particles...and most importantly fill Fukushima with the smell and taste of buttery goodness!!


Just joking, TEPCO. Please don't try this at home.
edit on 2-6-2011 by windwaker because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 2 2011 @ 11:30 PM
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Originally posted by windwaker
Since the Fukushima Disaster happened almost three months ago, and Japan doesn't want to say crap about the status regardless of how their failed nuclear plants affect the health of the rest of the world...is it okay to start cracking jokes about Fukushima now?

Just saying.


Of course it is too early. My girlfriend just got back from Japan and told
me how bad things really are. On the upside though when the tornadoes
went through and we lost power I realized she also doubles as a flashlight.



posted on Jun, 3 2011 @ 12:08 AM
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reply to post by KaiserSoze
 


All the rage!




from Geekologie



posted on Jun, 3 2011 @ 12:45 AM
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I really don't think it was fog or mist earlier. Reactor 4 is puffing out steam/smoke as you can see it against the tower behind. Sometimes you cannot see the lower part of the tower and this is how it was this morning there. Then it got worse and all 4 reactors were covered in mist/steam/fog/smoke or whatever. The only thing you could see was the light post in front of the reactors. Anything further than that was obscured.

Is there anywhere where we can find the realtime temperature readings for that time (7-9am Japan time) ?

Using this Tepco link
edit on 3-6-2011 by qmantoo because: added link



posted on Jun, 3 2011 @ 01:47 AM
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One page behind but looking at the live cam I see a good amount of steam from 4 and from 2 almost as much.

Here's a quick screen grab:



posted on Jun, 3 2011 @ 05:10 AM
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www.greenpeace.org...

Blogpost by Justin - June 3, 2011 at 11:12

The United Nation’s International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) inspected the carnage at Japan’s Fukushima nuclear power plant last week. Take a look at this photograph of their representative. Take a look at their plastic suits with IAEA hastily sprayed on the back in paint or scrawled on with marker pen. Doesn’t exactly inspire confidence does it?

The IAEA was at Fukushima to assess the situation at the disaster site in its role as the global nuclear watchdog and regulator. The problem is that that’s not the organisations only role. The IAEA is a four-headed beast.

Firstly, the IAEA needs to guard against the spreading of nuclear weapons – among others by overseeing that no nuclear material from the nuclear industry is diverted for military use. You remember probably their missions to Iraq and Iran.

Secondly, the IAEA draws up nuclear safety standards. These are used as benchmarks in virtually all nuclear countries. In the European Union they are even enshrined in law.

Thirdly, it controls research on health issues surrounding radiation that should then feed into its safety standards.

Fourthly, it promotes nuclear power. According to the statutes of the agency, the objective of the IAEA is to ‘accelerate and enlarge the contribution of atomic energy’.

Can you begin to see the conflicts of interest here? An organisation charged with promoting nuclear power around the world also controls nuclear safety and health standards. It’s like expecting a tobacco company to prevent lung cancer.

And it gets worse. The IAEA holds a veto over World Health Organization (WHO) programs related to radiation and nuclear power. This has undermined WHO’s ability to respond properly to disasters like the one at Fukushima. The IAEA has vetoed WHO conferences on radiation and health. Independent research has been under-funded and critical scientists ostracized.

Through the dominance of the IAEA and the nuclear industry, the health effects of radiation have been misrepresented and underestimated. As a result, the WHO is unable to provide independent advice and assessments of nuclear accidents in order to protect people at risk.

Which brings us back to Fukushima. The IAEA might like to think it is independent but it is far from it. The way it communicates its message is designed to serve the interests of the nuclear industry and governments not people’s health or the environment. In the aftermath of the Fukushima disaster, the IAEA channelled all its information through the Japanese government who could then, if it chose, to delay or downplay it.

Thus we got things like the venting of radioactive steam on March 13 that caused much of the iodine contamination being described as a much safer sounding ‘controlled release of vapour’.

Furthermore, at no stage has the IAEA given any recommendations or analysis of the Fukushima situation. It failed to issue any kind of warning on the likely amounts of radiation released from the overheating reactors or the overly optimistic assessments provided by the Japanese government in the early days of the crisis.

The latest proof of its happy-clappy outlook on Fukushima can be found in the UK nuclear regulator Michael Weightman-led IAEA mission to the destroyed reactors.

The Japanese Government’s longer term response to protect the public,including evacuation, has been impressive and extremely well organized.

What? The village of Iitate close to Fukushima was only evacuated weeks after Greenpeace had found far over-limit levels of radiation there. Schoolchildren were expected to withstand 20 times the International Commission of Radiological Protection's recommended radiation limit. Maybe Mr. Weightman hadn't had the time to follow the news about Fukushima in the last weeks and someone forgot to tell him about this during his trip to Japan.

But the conclusion of the mission report summary maybe beats it all:

The IAEA mission urges the international nuclear community to take advantage of the unique opportunity created by the Fukushima accident to seek to learn and improve worldwide nuclear safety.

Of course! Nuclear safety is in good hands. The Fukushima disaster was the cold shower needed to refresh nuclear safety culture.

It’s time the IAEA was reformed. It should remember that it serves the people of the world not the nuclear industry or governments with dirty and dangerous secrets to hide.



posted on Jun, 3 2011 @ 06:17 AM
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New anomaly at R-4...Look and tell me what you think it is. I "see" a bright yellow light around midway and to the right. A single bright yellow light, not from a spot light in the ground. hmmmmm.... TIA

news.tbs.co.jp...



posted on Jun, 3 2011 @ 06:27 AM
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reply to post by Destinyone
 


Yes I see it, plus there's a bigger green light above it now. I have no idea what it can be, but the fact its big, bright and GREEN doesn't inspire me with confidence.

Hopefully its some work being done if not then its the SPF having some trouble.



posted on Jun, 3 2011 @ 06:41 AM
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Originally posted by Destinyone
New anomaly at R-4...Look and tell me what you think it is. I "see" a bright yellow light around midway and to the right. A single bright yellow light, not from a spot light in the ground. hmmmmm.... TIA

news.tbs.co.jp...


See it

And don't know what it could be?



Ah ha - could be the putzmiester? Are they checking and filling the SFP tonight?
edit on 3/6/11 by imlite because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 3 2011 @ 06:50 AM
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the red glow may be overheated graphite or metal - I saw something like this at videos from Chernobyl (www.youtube.com... 0:44) . But green... maybe there's some internal control system with big lamp?

here's what I found in the wiki -



Boric acid is used in nuclear power plants as a neutron poison to slow down the rate at which fission is occurring. Fission chain reactions are generally driven by the amount of neutrons present (as products from previous fissions). Natural boron is 20% boron-10 and about 80% boron-11. Boron-10 has a high cross-section for absorption of low energy (thermal) neutrons. By adding more boric acid to the reactor coolant which circulates through the reactor, the probability that a neutron can survive to cause fission is reduced. Therefore, changes in boric acid concentration effectively regulate the rate of fission taking place in the reactor. This method is only used in pressurized water reactors (PWRs). Boron is also dissolved into the spent fuel pools containing used uranium rods. The concentration is high enough to keep neutron multiplication at a minimum.

Boric acid can be used as a colorant to make fire green.


source - en.wikipedia.org...

So it seems to be a real fire burning there.
edit on 3-6-2011 by AstraCat because: (no reason given)




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