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Japan declares 'nuclear emergency' after quake

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posted on May, 18 2011 @ 11:28 AM
link   

Originally posted by imlite
The British Government have just released their interim report on the Fukushima.accident.

This is a precursor document to the detailed announcement of an increase in the number of nuclear power plants and related investment. The increase in number is to enable a reduction in carbon emissions and increased low cost electricity supply.

Lots of interesting conclusions:


Conclusion 1: In considering the direct causes of the Fukushima accident we see no reason for curtailing the operation of nuclear power plants or other nuclear facilities in the UK. Once further work is completed any proposed improvements will be considered and implemented on a case by case basis, in line with our normal regulatory approach.

Conclusion 2: In response to the Fukushima accident, the UK nuclear power industry has reacted responsibly and appropriately displaying leadership for safety and a strong safety culture in its response to date.

Conclusion 3: The Government’s intention to take forward proposals to create the Office for Nuclear Regulation, with the post and responsibilities of the Chief Inspector in statute, should enhance confidence in the UK’s nuclear regulatory regime to more effectively face the challenges of the future.

Conclusion 4: To date, the consideration of the known circumstances of the Fukushima accident has not revealed any gaps in scope or depth of the Safety Assessment Principles for nuclear facilities in the UK.

Conclusion 5: Our considerations of the events in Japan, and the possible lessons for the UK, has not revealed any significant weaknesses in the UK nuclear licensing regime.

Conclusion 6: Flooding risks are unlikely to prevent construction of new nuclear power stations at potential development sites in the UK over the next few years. For sites with a flooding risk, detailed consideration may require changes to plant layout and the provision of particular protection against flooding.

Conclusion 7: There is no need to change the present siting strategies for new nuclear power stations in the UK.

Conclusion 8: There is no reason to depart from a multi-plant site concept given the design measures in new reactors being considered for deployment in the UK and adequate demonstration in design and operational safety cases.

Conclusion 9: The UK’s gas-cooled reactors have lower power densities and larger thermal capacities than water cooled reactors which with natural cooling capabilities give longer timescales for remedial action. Additionally, they have a lesser need for venting on loss of cooling and do not produce concentrations of hydrogen from fuel cladding overheating.

Conclusion 10: There is no evidence to suggest that the presence of MOX fuel in Reactor Unit 3 significantly contributed to the health impact of the accident on or off the site.

Conclusion 11: With more information there is likely to be considerable scope for lessons to be learnt about human behaviour in severe accident conditions that will be useful in enhancing contingency arrangements and training in the UK for such events.


The document (122 pages) with much detail on the Fukushima accident can be found here:

Fukushima interim report

I await the US equivalent from the Obama Administration!



Nuclear inspector accused of complacency after reactors get all-clear

Doug Parr, policy director at Greenpeace, said the regulator's review of safety essentially concluded that the industry should go away and think about it. "Many people will regard that as complacent, given the huge cost and misery inflicted by the Japanese accident, and this cannot inspire confidence in Britain's nuclear regulators. Even as the struggle to control Fukushima reactors continues, it appears Huhne has rushed to judgement on the safety of reactors to keep the timetable for new nuclear power on track," he added. Paul Dorfman, an academic and member of the Nuclear Consultation Group, said it was an "outrage" that conclusions on Fukushima had been made while facts from Japan remained so sketchy and the crisis was far from over. He added: "There is really not enough information around yet to base any rational decisions on."

www.guardian.co.uk...

Mike Weightman, Britain's the chief nuclear safety inspector who wrote this, is the one who will be the head of the IAEAs Fukushima investigation next month... A fox guarding the hen house?
www.iaea.org...
edit on 18-5-2011 by Tworide because: added link




posted on May, 18 2011 @ 11:52 AM
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interesting link about Fukushima at the Kurzweil blog. No new information, and even now reading all the new news about Fukushima, it strikes me that so many "new" facts are still distorted, but I digress. In the article I link to, the reporter writes that yes, it was a cover-up, that she learnt from connections high-up in the US, that they already knew it was a meltdown on March. 14.
www.kurzweilai.net... urzweilAI+Daily+Newsletter&utm_campaign=8c8543b647-UA-946742-1&utm_medium=email



posted on May, 18 2011 @ 12:18 PM
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Alert posted in ATS thread that hits a little close to home per our discussion and needs to be noted. Making this thread's members and readers aware...

Link to ATS thread


Alert! Netanyahu now in US for possible False Flag event? And a message to the military




Originally posted by wcitizen
I just read this article on Veterans Today.

www.veteranstoday.com...

Snip



“Today Israeli prime minister Benjamin Netanyahu, who was present for both the U.S. 9/11 and the U.K. 7/7 terror attacks, comes to Washington, DC, and will remain in the U.S. until late next week. The last time he visited, secret national level nuclear war games began, and four U.S. nuclear reactors had emergencies.”

Constitutional Captains Coup

Yesterday was the beginning of an ominous set of events in the U.S. and Israel, the sum of which warrants — demands – the most dire conclusions and counteractions. As principled patriots read and reflect, I urge them to listen to and learn from my recorded broadcast of military coup orders accepted, even applauded, by half a dozen Ghost Troop officers,. Most of us were mere captains, but we acted decisively — in accordance with our military training — to preempt what was clearly treason under Article 3, Section 3 of the U.S. Constitution:

[....]



I find this worrying. Given all the hype about possible events in May, the floods in the New Madrid area, the current exercises, Netanyahu's visit is one more sign things could be about to kick off. He's like the harbinger of death and destruction.

The writer of the article led a group of military who carried out a coup because of orders they deemed unconstitutional some tme ago. He is now urging the US military personnel to put the protection of the people as the highest priority above all else.


Reminders:


As the world continues to gaze with concern at Japan’s Fukushima nuclear power plant, hi-tech security cameras installed by an Israeli defense firm are recording events at the troubled core from an insider’s vantage point.


Link

If someone can find the post in our thread showing a disturbing picture of the camera in Unit 3 and comparing it to a design for a known explosive device...that would be wonderful. Search is failing me. Should be on or around when a certain virus was discussed. Thanks. Gotta run.
edit on 18-5-2011 by DancedWithWolves because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 18 2011 @ 12:22 PM
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Early on, after the pressure losses were noticed, we were able to realise that even the strongest containment vessel piping and connections are subject to the same stresses of earthquake movement as everything else.


Originally posted by imlite
The British Government have just released their interim report on the Fukushima.accident.

This is a precursor document to the detailed announcement of an increase in the number of nuclear power plants and related investment. The increase in number is to enable a reduction in carbon emissions and increased low cost electricity supply.

Lots of interesting conclusions:


Conclusion 1: In considering the direct causes of the Fukushima accident we see no reason for curtailing the operation of nuclear power plants or other nuclear facilities in the UK. Once further work is completed any proposed improvements will be considered and implemented on a case by case basis, in line with our normal regulatory approach.

How about the case with a much larger than anticipated earthquake?

Conclusion 4: To date, the consideration of the known circumstances of the Fukushima accident has not revealed any gaps in scope or depth of the Safety Assessment Principles for nuclear facilities in the UK.

Again, earthquakes magically brushed through the gaps.

Conclusion 5: Our considerations of the events in Japan, and the possible lessons for the UK, has not revealed any significant weaknesses in the UK nuclear licensing regime.

I'm sorry, however the old dead horse seems to have nuclear power relegated to the 'too dangerous at worst case to be worth it' bin.

Conclusion 6: Flooding risks are unlikely to prevent construction of new nuclear power stations at potential development sites in the UK over the next few years. For sites with a flooding risk, detailed consideration may require changes to plant layout and the provision of particular protection against flooding.

Minor engineering problem compared to an extreme earthquake. We simply can't engineer around all possible levels of them.

Conclusion 7: There is no need to change the present siting strategies for new nuclear power stations in the UK.

Perhaps nuclear usage in space would be safer? Oh wait, many re-entry accidents have already occured, all over the world.

Conclusion 10: There is no evidence to suggest that the presence of MOX fuel in Reactor Unit 3 significantly contributed to the health impact of the accident on or off the site.

Nothing other than its' fine powdered construction, higher burnup and operation temperature.

Conclusion 11: With more information there is likely to be considerable scope for lessons to be learnt about human behaviour in severe accident conditions that will be useful in enhancing contingency arrangements and training in the UK for such events.

It is taught in aviation that 80% of all air accidents are caused by human error


The document (122 pages) with much detail on the Fukushima accident can be found here:

Fukushima interim report

I await the US equivalent from the Obama Administration!

I wonder if it'll top the WTC7 freefall NIST report graph d;




edit on 18/5/11 by GhostR1der because: green not workin



posted on May, 18 2011 @ 12:41 PM
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reply to post by GhostR1der
 


All I know is that all the triple-redundant systems have failed. It is as though they shouldn't even have bothered adding any safety system at all...... and now the British says that it is impossible to happen at their nuclear plants. I am sure that that was what the Japanese also said on March. 10, and then, impossible as it is, all their systems failed, and a couple of days later, the corium melted through the primary containment (and quite possibly the secondary containment), that the Americans still said last week was impossible!!!!, either that, or we seriously have to look at the possibility of sabotage on an extreme scale.



posted on May, 18 2011 @ 12:57 PM
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www.youtube.com...=26 i wonder if there using these to clean up it says they got them in 2004(cracked) and these things look like if they put a radiation proof cab on them could realy be cleaning up japan at the moment...

The T-52 Enryu is a Japanese machine (wait, another entry from Japan? What are the odds!?) built back in 2004 by a company named Tmsuk. It weighs five tons, and stands 10-feet high. It's also called the Hyper Rescue Robot (thaaat's more like the Japan we know and love) because the mech's primary purpose is to clear a path through wreckage after earthquakes and other disasters. It proved quite effective in performance tests, even lifting an entire car from a snowbank.

Read more: 5 Real-World Mechs Straight out of Science Fiction | Cracked.com www.cracked.com...

edit on 18-5-2011 by KilrathiLG because: provide link explaing said device in a humors manner


books.google.com... U&hl=en&ei=knS_TdbmMvHWiAKEtfyXAw&sa=X&oi=book_result&ct=result&resnum=8&ved=0CEUQ6AEwBw#v=onepage&q&f=false if the link works thats to a project from the 70s that was designed to work on nuclear jet engines? and later repurposed out to fix nuclear screw ups....why arent we dusting this stuff off for use in japan....
edit on 18-5-2011 by KilrathiLG because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 18 2011 @ 01:09 PM
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Originally posted by Hellhound604
reply to post by GhostR1der
 


All I know is that all the triple-redundant systems have failed. It is as though they shouldn't even have bothered adding any safety system at all...... and now the British says that it is impossible to happen at their nuclear plants. I am sure that that was what the Japanese also said on March. 10, and then, impossible as it is, all their systems failed, and a couple of days later, the corium melted through the primary containment (and quite possibly the secondary containment), that the Americans still said last week was impossible!!!!, either that, or we seriously have to look at the possibility of sabotage on an extreme scale.


Well...some folks are asking the right questions....Hey Collective Brain Cells, have been reading, have missed posting with you.


Fukushima: Are Faulty Vents a Global Danger?

Posted by Eben Harrell Wednesday, May 18, 2011 at 11:53 am

Of all the crucial decisions that Tepco engineers faced at the Fukushima Power Plant in the frenzied hours after the March 11 earthquake, none was more agonizing or difficult than this: should the company intentionally vent gas from the overheating reactors even though doing so would release radioactivity into the atmosphere?



There are two main questions that the Fukushima venting problems raise. The first is whether existing Bioling Water Reactors (BWRs) in the U.S. and elsewhere have adequate venting systems to handle serious loss of coolant accidents. The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission mandated in the 1980s that an enhanced venting system be installed at boiling water reactors that use the same containment system as Fukushima. Early on after the Japanese quake, U.S. experts had said that U.S. plants were safer because of these improvements.

But this week it emerged that Tepco had installed the new venting system at Fukushima, and it still malfunctioned.


Yes, I am taking names....HE's on my short list NRC spokesman Scott Burnell


So should the NRC require U.S. plants to redesign their venting systems? "It's still too soon to start drawing conclusions on either the events at Fukushima or how our task force will examine/evaluate verified information from the incident to provide possible recommendations to the Commission," NRC spokesman Scott Burnell told Ecocentric. Of course, that doesn't mean the NRC won't be looking closely at the issue.

Read more: ecocentric.blogs.time.com...


Des



posted on May, 18 2011 @ 01:33 PM
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A voice from the past, expresses anger, and fears for today...


Hiroshima A-bomb victim voices anger over handling of nuclear crisis
Atsushi Hoshino gives his views about the nuclear accident at his residence in Fukushima. (Mainichi)

FUKUSHIMA -- Atsushi Hoshino, an 83-year-old A-bomb victim from Hiroshima, harshly criticized the government's handing of the ongoing crisis at the nuclear power plant crippled by the March 11 earthquake and tsunami, calling for a sweeping review of the nation's energy policy and people's ways of life.



Hoshino, a professor emeritus at Fukushima University, told the Mainichi in an interview in his home in Fukushima that he had initially thought that nuclear power generation was different in nature from the blasting of weapons of mass destruction.


I love it, he has the balls to tell it like it is.


"But when I actually saw the nuclear reactors getting out of control, I had to change my thinking," he said. Based on his own experience as well as the suffering inflicted on many other victims of the atomic bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki, he expressed his anxiety and anger over the way the government has been responding to the nuclear disaster.


He's the part of the beginning of an avalanche of very angry response...


"I am very upset with Tokyo Electric Power Co., the government, and the Nuclear and Industrial Safety Agency. Their safety management, including their post-accident response, has been unbelievably lax. I don't sense an enthusiasm from them to work hard to protect people's lives," he said. "Based on the lessons we learn from this nuclear accident, I think we have to review the energy policy and our way of life."

(Mainichi Japan) May 5, 2011 mdn.mainichi.jp...


Des



posted on May, 18 2011 @ 01:33 PM
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reply to post by DancedWithWolves
 



Here you go....enjoy!



edit on 18-5-2011 by rbrtj because: made pretty



posted on May, 18 2011 @ 01:34 PM
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reply to post by Destinyone
 


I remember in that NRC Advisory meeting transcript, the one with a lot of "um, er let's discuss that off record" in it, one of the attendees seemed to want to know urgently whether FD had the same type of venting (hardened did he say?) but it was kind of "let's discuss that later, don't know..."



posted on May, 18 2011 @ 01:48 PM
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I just found this document whilst diggng around, and hadn't seen it on here so here it is:

May 14th "Results of analysis of common spent fuel pool water of Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Sation [sic: multiple nuclear disaster epicenter]"

www.tepco.co.jp.cache.yimg.jp...

Is this the actual test results from May 14th or just the appendix/contextual references from Feb 2010?

If the readings are indeed at those levels, I guess that would be somewhat reassuring, except of course for the close proximity of those 6 other traumatised units/meltdowns/criticalities, the ongoing seismic onslaught, or concerns about structural/foundation damage from the EQ, subsidence and liquefaction...?



posted on May, 18 2011 @ 01:58 PM
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A day late and a dollar short Kan...


Kan to review Japan's nuclear fuel cycle policy: Shii

TOKYO (Kyodo) -- Prime Minister Naoto Kan intends to review Japan's nuclear fuel cycle policy in the wake of the nuclear crisis triggered by the March 11 earthquake and tsunami disaster, Japanese Communist Party chief Kazuo Shii said Tuesday.

Kan referred to his intention when he met Shii at the premier's official residence, the JCP head told a press conference after the meeting.


So, TEPCO has been taking spent fuel to Rokkasho Village recycling...


Noting that the cycle of bringing spent nuclear fuel to recycling facilities in Rokkasho village in Aomori Prefecture has become unworkable as the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant has been crippled by the disaster, Kan said, adding he will review the nation's basic energy plan "from scratch," according to Shii.

The nuclear fuel cycle policy involves extracting plutonium from spent fuel for reprocessing.


A little info on the MOX plant, actually there is a lot of info on this plant, including court cases trying to stop it.


JNFL Rokkasho-mura MOX fuel fabrication plant project (Japan)

Construction of JNFL Rokkasho MOX fuel plant starts (Japan)

Japan Nuclear Fuel Ltd. started Thursday (Oct. 28) in Aomori Prefecture the construction of what is set to become Japan's first commercial plant to produce plutonium-uranium mixed oxide, or MOX, fuel. The plant, scheduled to be completed in March 2016 at a cost of around 190 billion yen [US$ 2.33 billion] in the village of Rokkasho in the northeastern Japan prefecture, is expected to serve as a key facility in establishing the infrastructure for recycling spent nuclear fuel. It will be able to produce up to 130 tons of MOX fuel a year by changing powdered MOX, extracted from spent nuclear fuel at an adjacent reprocessing plant, into fuel pellets.
The launch comes after the Nuclear and Industrial Safety Agency at the Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry authorized the plant's construction plan Friday (Oct. 22). The project itself was approved by the ministry in May following a longer-than-expected process of assessing its quake-resistance strength since 2005. (Mainichi Oct. 28, 2010)


And, who's running this party...guess some balloons are popping now...


JNFL produces first mixed oxides for MOX fuel
On Nov. 2, 2006, Japan Nuclear Fuel Ltd external link (JNFL) announced it has produced first uranium-plutonium mixed oxides in its Rokkasho reprocessing plant in Aomori Prefecture. The mixed oxides will be further processed into MOX fuel.
You'll need to scroll down to about 4/5ths to the bottom of the page for all info in this document. www.wise-uranium.org...

This is a really big rug to dig under. AREVA has whole hands in this pie. I'm also looking for info on AREVA'S good buds Magna ....I will find it too



Press release

October 02, 2007

Bethesda, Md., October 1, 2007 - The International Nuclear Recycling Alliance (INRA) - led by AREVA and Mitsubishi Heavy Industries, Ltd. and including Japan Nuclear Fuel Limited; Washington Group International; BWX Technologies, Inc.; and Battelle -- has just signed a contract with the Department of Energy (DOE) to evaluate closing the nuclear fuel cycle in the U.S., through the development of a nuclear fuel recycling center and an advanced recycling reactor. The contract was awarded within the framework of the Global Nuclear Energy Partnership (GNEP).
www.areva.com...



Edited to add.....nuggets ....many MOX FUEL nuggets, from same above site.



Under the terms of the contract, INRA will provide three major studies:
• Technology development roadmaps analyzing the technology needed to achieve GNEP goals;
• Business plans showing methods for the development and commercialization of advanced GNEP technologies and facilities;
• Conceptual design studies for the nuclear fuel recycling center and the advanced recycling reactor.

INRA companies will be responsible for the following activities in realizing the contract for the DOE:

AREVA, supported by Japan Nuclear Fuel Limited, will perform conceptual design studies and develop a technology roadmap for the nuclear fuel recycling center.

Mitsubishi Heavy Industries, Ltd. will perform conceptual design studies and develop a technology roadmap for the advanced recycling reactor, based on a loop-type reactor;

Japan Nuclear Fuel Limited, in addition to supporting AREVA's work on the nuclear fuel recycling center, will perform specific studies of safety design principles and safeguards.

Battelle will be the lead for both the analysis for and preparation of the technology roadmap and DOE reporting.

BWX Technologies, Inc. will be the lead for safeguards and security, as well as licensing support.

Washington Group International will provide architect and engineering services.

AREVA, Inc. President Michael McMurphy said, "Our approach applies innovative technologies and truly unmatched operating experience from INRA best-in-class companies. Combined, we will offer DOE comprehensive, credible industry information on cost, schedule, and business planning for developing and deploying a closed fuel cycle in the United States."



Des




edit on 03/28/2011 by Destinyone because: (no reason given)

edit on 03/28/2011 by Destinyone because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 18 2011 @ 02:04 PM
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M 5.0, off the east coast of Honshu, Japan

Wednesday, May 18, 2011 17:15:57 UTC
Thursday, May 19, 2011 03:15:57 AM at epicenter

Depth: 46.10 km (28.65 mi)



Posted on 18



posted on May, 18 2011 @ 02:13 PM
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You know Folks, it's articles like this, that prove to me that money talks louder than health concerns. It goes to show, there will never be the checks in place, to keep food supplies within legal limits. Whatever legal limits means. The limits, as we've already seen, can be changed at whim. And, there will always be a black marcket channel for any goods deemed over limits.


Shizuoka, Kanagawa governments oppose radiation screening order for tea leaves

The Shizuoka and Kanagawa prefectural governments have called on the Ministry of Health, Labor and Welfare to withdraw its request for local authorities in northeastern and eastern Japan to check radiation levels in green tea leaves during processing.

After the amount of radioactive cesium exceeding the legal limit was detected in green tea leaves harvested in Ibaraki and Kanagawa prefectures, the health ministry ordered Tokyo and 13 prefectures in northeastern and eastern Japan on May 16 to ban shipments of half-processed steam dried green tea leaves, known as "Aracha," if cesium tops the national permissible limit of 500 becquerels per kilogram.

The cesium concentration in steam dried green tea can become about five times as high as that in raw leaves, prompting the ministry to order the prefectures to check radiation levels in Aracha.

However, the move met with opposition from Shizuoka and Kanagawa prefectures. mdn.mainichi.jp...


Des


edit on 03/28/2011 by Destinyone because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 18 2011 @ 02:21 PM
link   
reply to post by Destinyone
 


Whooee!!!



posted on May, 18 2011 @ 02:29 PM
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Originally posted by jadedANDcynical
reply to post by Destinyone
 


Whooee!!!



posted on May, 18 2011 @ 02:30 PM
link   

Originally posted by Hellhound604
reply to post by GhostR1der
 


All I know is that all the triple-redundant systems have failed. It is as though they shouldn't even have bothered adding any safety system at all...... and now the British says that it is impossible to happen at their nuclear plants. I am sure that that was what the Japanese also said on March. 10, and then, impossible as it is, all their systems failed, and a couple of days later, the corium melted through the primary containment (and quite possibly the secondary containment), that the Americans still said last week was impossible!!!!, either that, or we seriously have to look at the possibility of sabotage on an extreme scale.



Human error
A review of the reactor logs shows that the steam driven isolation condensers were shut down by the operators after the quake, but before the tsunami. Once the the backup generators failed, there was no power to open the valves for the condensers, that plus a failure to vent the reactors earlier (TEPCO upper management decision) had sealed the deal on the outcome for Fukushima, at least for reactor #1.


Documents released by Tepco Monday showed the isolation condenser— an emergency cooling system installed on Reactor No. 1 before the quake as a final resort in case of a total loss of power—worked only sporadically, if at all. Tepco officials explained that somebody appears to have manually closed the valves on the condenser soon after the March 11 quake—but before the tsunami hit about an hour later—to control the fluctuating pressure inside the reactor. Reopening the valves required battery power, so those valves likely couldn't be opened because the tsunami damaged the backup batteries. If the valves hadn't been shut, things might have turned out differently. Temperatures in the reactor climbed faster than initially expected, causing more and faster damage

"If the dog hadn't stop to s%#t, he'd had caught the rabbit" -for all the rednecks out there...
online.wsj.com...
NOTE!: on WSJ links, you will have to access them from a search engine to see the whole article, pasted links from other sites will only give you an abbreviated page.

TMI also had operator error thrown in the mix, exacerbating the meltdown.
www.threemileisland.org...



posted on May, 18 2011 @ 02:41 PM
link   
...ripples....


The Future of Nuclear Power Post-Fukushima

Thursday, May 19, 2011 - Thursday, May 19, 2011
Event Start Time (Eastern Time):
12:00 PM
City:
Virtual Event
Company:
Energy Central

Nuclear power is a critical component of America's generation fleet, accounting for one-fifth of our electricity. The business case for nuclear power has been problematic even before this spring's events in Japan that have put a cloud over planned nuclear projects in this country and around the world. Tough questions have been raised, including: What are the dimensions of the financial, regulatory and public relations problems now confronting nuclear power - and what strategies are emerging as the best set of policies for dealing with those issues?





Crisis at the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant continues almost two months after Japan’s March 11 earthquake and tsunami, causing government agencies in the United States to turn a scrutinizing eye toward nuclear plants stateside. Will we soon need to find a substitute for nuclear power, the source of one-fifth of our nation’s energy?





Join three of America’s top authorities on nuclear power as they share up-to-the-minute thinking on how to financially and strategically prepare for anticipated changes being driven by public opinion and environmental regulations.


Bill Borchardt
executive director for operations, Nuclear Energy Committee

John Herron
president, CEO and chief nuclear officer, Entergy Nuclear

Jim Hunter
utility director, International Brotherhood of Electrical Workers (IBEW)

Moderated by
Marty Rosenberg
editor-in-chief of EnergyBiz magazine
www.energybiz.com...


Des



posted on May, 18 2011 @ 02:44 PM
link   
reply to post by Silverlok
 


Silverlok, thanks for taking the time to respond re: Rs 5 & 6 and jog my memory about Arnie's statements...I had heard them, and forgotten them...

Of course, R 4 (with those very convincing photos posted here of what looks like an oozing of molten fuel from it's spent fuel pool out of a hole and down the outside of the building) had the most fuel assemblies (1,535) and that included new/active loads from it's core, but of course 5 & 6 had the next largest load in their pools (994 and 940 respectively)...

I hope 5 & 6 were seperated in their fate by the lack of the hotter fuel...but in any case, it doesn't look to me like much of those 1,535 assemblies in 4 are left, and quite a bit looks like it has introduced itself to the world at large.

Has anybody seen any plans mentioned by TEPCO about the common spent fuel pool's fate? If it's in as good order as they say, surely the priority would be to capitalize on that and initiate a transfer to a safer site (e.g. seismically) and before any further deterioration to the buildings struucture, foundations? Surely they have to try to get it out
  • rather than leaving an additional 6,375 (undamaged) fuel assemblies within a complex that is likely going to need to be entombed in metres of sand and concrete at some point...? Do you think the environmental radiation at that structure has already exceeded any opportunity to do that for the foreseeable?


    [*TEPCO: Please God, don't think anybody will accept that after a 9.0 EQ, all those after shocks, or the other trauma history of this site, the common spent fuel pool buildings (I believe there are actually two/annexed if you look at the site history) building is likely to be fit for purpose to store 6,375 fuel rods that NEED 100% cooling to remain safe]
    edit on 18-5-2011 by curioustype because: Further associated venting required/added



  • posted on May, 18 2011 @ 02:51 PM
    link   
    The fun just never ends....yes, that was sarcastic...


    Nuclear Physicist: Most of the fallout from plutonium-containing MOX fuel will drop on U.S., unless very strong winds take it elsewhere
    May 18th, 2011 at 05:08 AM

    Interview with Akira Tokuhiro, Nuclear Engineer: Fukushima and the Mass Media, Vivian Norris for Hufffington Post, May 17, 2011:

    [...] Fukushima differs from other nuclear reactors in that it uses a dirty fuel or MOX which is banned in many of the countries where nuclear power is a major energy source. My Swedish-Russian nuclear physicist friend is sending me links for reliable radioactivity readings and weather/wind patterns. We must remember some of what is posted on the internet are simulations, not actual readings. But he did add this:

    The most terrifying fact is that the Japanese power plants are using ‘dirty’ fuel, which most countries have rejected and banned. Needless to say that the Americans built them. Since the Earth is moving Counterclockwise most of the fall-out will drop on U.S., unless very strong winds take it somewhere else enenews.com...


    And this for review...




    Interview with Akira Tokuhiro, Nuclear Engineer: Fukushima and the Mass Media
    Posted: 05/17/11 05:28 PM ET

    "Only the mass media can put the kind of pressure on TEPCO and the Japanese government to bring about major change. This will cost at least 10 billion dollars if not 20-30 billion to clean up. It will take at least 10 years if not 20 and roughly 10,000 people working on the cleanup. The nuclear business is global. This needs an international effort to clean up Fukushima."
    -- Nuclear Engineer Akira Tokuhir www.huffingtonpost.com...


    Des



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