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Japan declares 'nuclear emergency' after quake

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posted on Mar, 14 2011 @ 11:16 PM
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According to the BBC live feed on the subject, radiation levels hitting Tokyo are higher than normal, but not a threat to human health (whatever that means)




posted on Mar, 14 2011 @ 11:17 PM
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NHK said a few minutes ago that the isotopes being detected in Tokyo are cesium and iodine.



posted on Mar, 14 2011 @ 11:17 PM
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Latest situation update from:hisz.rsoe.hu...


Situation Update No. 28
On 15.03.2011 at 03:50 GMT+2

Japan's nuclear crisis deepened Tuesday as a third blast and a fire rocked a stricken atomic power plant, sending radiation up to alarming levels, after a quake-tsunami catastrophe. Radiation levels around the Fukushima No.1 plant on the eastern coast have "risen considerably", Prime Minister Naoto Kan said, and his chief spokesman said the level was now considered high enough to endanger human health. Kan told people living up to 10 kilometres (six miles) beyond a 20km (12-mile) exclusion zone around the nuclear plant to stay indoors. The fire was burning in the plant's number-four reactor, he said, meaning that four out of six reactors at the site 250 kilometres (155 miles) northeast of Tokyo are now in trouble. As well as the atomic emergency, Japan is struggling to cope with the enormity of the damage from Friday's record-breaking quake and the tsunami which raced across vast tracts of its northeast, destroying all before it. The official death toll has risen to 2,414, police said Tuesday, but officials say at least 10,000 are likely to have perished. A huge explosion rocked the ageing Fukushima facility shortly after dawn Tuesday, the third since Friday as engineers struggle to control overheating reactors. Japan's nuclear safety agency said the operator of the stricken plant believed the seal around the reactor, which is critical for preventing a major radiation leak, had not been holed and was doing further checks.

But Kan's top spokesman Yukio Edano said there appeared to be damage to the structure around the number-two reactor, the third to be hit by an explosion since Friday's disaster which knocked out cooling systems. Edano, who is the chief cabinet secretary, told reporters there could be damage to the suppression pool of the reactor, which forms the base of the container vessel that seals the fuel rods. Plant operator Tokyo Electric Power Co. (TEPCO) "said it believes the container vessel has not sustained damage such as a hole, judging from the fact that the radiation level has not jumped", a safety agency spokesman told AFP. TEPCO said some workers had been evacuated from the number-two reactor at the plant, but those pumping water to cool the reactor were still at work. Higher radiation levels were earlier recorded in Ibaraki prefecture north of Tokyo after the the blast, Kyodo News reported, but it quoted the safety agency as saying that the level did not pose health risks. On Saturday an explosion blew apart the building surrounding the plant's number-one reactor but the seal around the reactor itself remained intact, officials said.

On Monday, a blast at its number-three reactor shook the facility, injuring 11 people and sending plumes of smoke billowing into the sky. Late Monday TEPCO said fuel rods at the number-two reactor were almost fully exposed after a cooling pump there temporarily failed. The UN's nuclear watchdog, the International Atomic Energy Agency, said Tokyo had asked for expert assistance in the aftermath of the quake which US seismologists are now measuring at 9.0-magnitude, revised up from 8.9. But the IAEA's Japanese chief Yukiya Amano moved to calm global fears that the situation could escalate to rival the world's worst nuclear crisis at Chernobyl in the Ukraine in 1986. "Let me say that the possibility that the development of this accident into one like Chernobyl is very unlikely," he said. Officials had already declared the exclusion zone within a 20-km radius of the plant and evacuated 210,000 people.

Situation Update No. 27
On 15.03.2011 at 03:46 GMT+2

An explosion that released radioactive material occurred in reactor No. 2 at the nuclear center at Fukushima, in northeastern Japan, on Monday. The blast damaged part of the primary container surrounding the reactor's core and caused an escape of an undetermined quantity of radioactive material, the Nuclear Security Agency said. The Kyodo news agency reported that radiation levels in the vicinity "exceeded the legal limit" after the explosion, which occurred at 6:10 a.m. on Tuesday local time (2110 GMT on Monday), shortly after the Japanese government admitted that the reactor continued to be unstable after it suffered damage in Friday's magnitude-9.0 earthquake. The operating crew at the plant worked all night to inject seawater into the secondary containment structure in an attempt to cool down the core and prevent a meltdown that could emit radioactive material, but that did not have the desired effect and the reactor was not able to be stabilized. If the nuclear fuel in the core begins to melt down, that would constitute an emergency situation of the highest order because of the potential for a severe radioactive leak that could contaminate the area. Reactor No. 2 at Fukushima on Monday suffered a failure of one of the 10 valves associated with its cooling system, something similar to what occurred before reactors 1 and 3 at the same center exploded after the quake.



posted on Mar, 14 2011 @ 11:19 PM
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reply to post by TheRedneck
 


The problem will be that these levels will continue to rise and any relief or emergency efforts would place the volunteers in peril by going in. This is not to say that the outside countries sending in teams will be as the question posed earlier in this thread, they may be kept at the peripheral of the disaster/radiation zones.

Also these representatives will be heavily armed with Hazmat suits as well as plenty of pharmaceuticals to keep them safe...



posted on Mar, 14 2011 @ 11:20 PM
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reply to post by TheStev

Humans can tolerate a certain amount of radiation without suffering irreversible damage. How much depends on the individual's health and the type of radiation.

I hope Tokyo is spared...

TheRedneck



posted on Mar, 14 2011 @ 11:20 PM
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reply to post by TheRedneck
 


What's frustrating is that we offered help on day 1 & they declined. If I'm not mistaken we had coolant ready to go in that day and they turned us away.



posted on Mar, 14 2011 @ 11:20 PM
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reply to post by Cloudsinthesky
 

I'm with you on that...but Gin! ...One of my friends parents & relatives are there in Japan...they
are alive & I have been trying to provide her (she's west coast..WA) news dates from here....
Hopefully she will join ATS....even with her Japan connections, I was able to provide her news links she wasn't aware of Thanks to the Thread!

Ektar



posted on Mar, 14 2011 @ 11:23 PM
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reply to post by xxPUSH0Noo
 


I am currently watching this site, don't know how much it would help, but if you listen to names of agencies mentioned you can link to those. It is certain to be horrific and now with the rolling blackouts...

www.livestation.com...
edit on 14-3-2011 by antar because: Edit for link



posted on Mar, 14 2011 @ 11:24 PM
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reply to post by antar

I have a lot of faith in the US Military. They have equipment to keep them safe at levels that would harm unprotected citizens, plus they will (hopefully) be able to perform most of the evacs using flight, reducing exposure time.

This is no longer a nuclear emergency; it is a rescue effort with a quickly ticking clock attached.

TheRedneck



posted on Mar, 14 2011 @ 11:24 PM
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Originally posted by AstraCat
Any pictures/videos of the reactor#2 available?
I've seen only pictures of yesterday's explosion at #3...


www.nytimes.com...

1st pic. slide the slider in the middle.
looks like chernobyl



posted on Mar, 14 2011 @ 11:26 PM
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reply to post by ethancoop

My God.... this is starting to sound like New Orleans and Katrina (just on a larger scale)...

I somehow missed that report.


TheRedneck



posted on Mar, 14 2011 @ 11:28 PM
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This is the latest from Kyodo...

# NEWS ADVISORY: Radiation amount in Chiba Pref. twice to 4 times normal level (13:14)
# NEWS ADVISORY: Radiation 33 times normal level measured in Utsunomiya, Tochigi (13:12)


Source english.kyodonews.jp...

Ektar



posted on Mar, 14 2011 @ 11:28 PM
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This is so terrible. I have been following this thread since the beginning, yes all 84 or 85 pages ago. My computer has not left this thread.

TheRedNeck: If they do have a "meltdown" and everyone evacuates, what are the chances 1, 2, and 3 all having a meltdown? And what if any, would the affects be on 4.

edit on 14-3-2011 by MoosKept240 because: messed up.



posted on Mar, 14 2011 @ 11:30 PM
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reply to post by TheRedneck
 


The reports were originally that the US was on it's way with coolant but that was later retracted. It turned out the US had generators and other needed equipment to help in the cooling process. Sorry I don't have a source, that was probably 20 threads and 1000 pages ago in memory!



posted on Mar, 14 2011 @ 11:33 PM
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reply to post by MoosKept240

TheRedNeck: If they do have a "meltdown" and everyone evacuates, what are the chances 1, 2, and 3 all having a meltdown?

100%


And what if any, would the affects be on 4.

Meltdown... 4, 5, and 6.


TheRedneck



posted on Mar, 14 2011 @ 11:35 PM
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NEWS ADVISORY: Radiation amount in Chiba Pref. twice to 4 times normal level



NEWS ADVISORY: Radiation 33 times normal level measured in Utsunomiya, Tochigi

english.kyodonews.jp...

just in

no-fly zone set for 30km radius over Fukushima nuke plant




edit on 14-3-2011 by leisas4 because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 14 2011 @ 11:35 PM
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reply to post by Ektar
 

You can see on t his Wind tracking website why all these radiation levels are going up. It's because the wind is blowing south and inland.

If I lived anywhere near the northern half of Japan, I would leave yesterday to head south, probably down to Fukuoka.

Having a job, house, and community doesn't do you much good if you are dead or sick from radiation poisoning.



posted on Mar, 14 2011 @ 11:36 PM
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reply to post by Ektar
 


Actually it was gin.......I didn't have my glasses on.........

Sitting here in the Mid-West needing to go to bed...........very worried what the next 6 to 8 hours will bring for those overseas...........



posted on Mar, 14 2011 @ 11:36 PM
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reply to post by TheRedneck
 


I changed it from 4 5 6 cause I saw the pic and all this info about everything has got a lot of my facts mixed up and I wasn't sure. So I changed it to what I felt I "knew".



posted on Mar, 14 2011 @ 11:40 PM
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The secondary effects are going to be as bad.. The market has crashed and the fear of radiation will ensure that tourism will take a beating.

I am due for a holiday, if I can, I am going to Japan. I wonder how fast a country can fall..

Poor Japan. My thoughts are with you.



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