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Japan declares 'nuclear emergency' after quake

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posted on May, 1 2011 @ 01:38 PM
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reply to post by Destinyone


No worries ... they are working on a fresh batch... posted this last night

More workers to be sent to Fukushima


The operator of the crippled Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant is studying the possibility of sending more employees and former employees to the plant.

People who have previously worked at the plant and who have been trained in nuclear-related matters, such as radiation monitoring, are the potential candidates. About 3,000 people are believed to qualify.

About 1,000 workers of Tokyo Electric Power Company and its contract companies are currently working at the power plant to bring it under control.

TEPCO laid out a plan on April 17th to stabilize the reactors in 6 to 9 months. But the work is expected to take a long time and the radiation level is high.

On Saturday, 2 workers were found to have been exposed to more than 200 millisieverts of radiation.

Another 30 workers or so were exposed to radiation in excess of 100 millisieverts.

The government recently raised the legal limit for radiation exposure during an emergency from 100 millisieverts to 250 millisieverts.

The power company considers it necessary to have more people on site to proceed with the operation while ensuring the safety of the workers.

Sunday, May 01, 2011 10:35 +0900 (JST)


www3.nhk.or.jp...




posted on May, 1 2011 @ 01:40 PM
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No abnormalities found in radiation levels in China
2011-05-01 20:43:10


news.xinhuanet.com/english2010/china/2011-05/01/c_13854379.htm


BEIJING, May 1 (Xinhua) -- The Chinese mainland's environmental radiation levels remain normal, according to a daily notice posted by China's National Nuclear Emergency Coordination Committee on Sunday.

No abnormalities in drinking water and food supplies have been detected in sample surveys, said the notice.

(...)


---

Cesium found in sludge


www3.nhk.or.jp/daily/english/01_25.html


Relatively high levels of radioactive cesium have been detected in the sludge from a waste water treatment plant in Koriyama City, Fukushima Prefecture.

The prefectural government is tracking some of the sludge that has been shipped out of the prefecture to be used in making cement.

The prefecture's investigation found that the sludge contained 26,400 becquerels of radioactive cesium per kilogram.

The solidified slag made from it contained 334,000 becquerels per kilogram, which is 1,300 times the level before the accident at the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant.

(...)

The ministry says there is no precedent for this, but that it will decide soon what to do.

Sunday, May 01, 2011 23:20 +0900 (JST)



posted on May, 1 2011 @ 01:41 PM
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reply to post by Tworide
 


Hey


... thank you for all the good work...

quick question...and I do appreciate it is left field....please be gentle with your answers.....Is there any chance this could be related to radioactive materials/water leaking down through the bedrock...

Can poolium or the radioactive wash off have an effect on the mantle below the plant?




posted on May, 1 2011 @ 01:55 PM
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They can attempt to censor the message. But, the messenger...ahhhh that's another story. They are like self propagating bubble wrap...you pop one bubble, two more appear! Blessed be the Messengers. pop pop pop....


China Times:

Two Japanese citizens, from Fukushima Prefecture where the March 11 earthquake and tsunami triggered the worst nuclear crisis in Japan's history, may be deported for attending the anti-nuke rally in Taipei Saturday. Officials have said the actions of the two women were contrary to the stated purpose of their visit to Taiwan.

The National Immigration Agency (NIA) said Sunday it will assess the police video footage of the protest and will decide whether or not to deport Ayako Oga and Saeko Uno. The two sang the song "We Shall Overcome," and made some brief remarks at the rally.

However, Hung Shen-han, deputy secretary-general of the Green Citizen's Action Alliance, condemned the NIA action, arguing that the government had "overreacted" to the matter. Hung said he was worried about the fate of Oga and Uno in Taiwan and his alliance would hire a lawyer for them to deal with the incident.(May 1, 2011)
focustaiwan.tw...


Des



posted on May, 1 2011 @ 01:56 PM
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reply to post by Destinyone
 


"They can attempt to censor the message. But, the messenger...ahhhh that's another story. They are like self propagating bubble wrap...you pop one bubble, two more appear! Blessed be the Messengers. pop pop pop...."

Are you referring to me and Vox?



edit on 1-5-2011 by mrbillshow because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 1 2011 @ 02:23 PM
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A question for regular posters on this thread.

Are you willing to submit your own analysis and conclusions to the same rigorous oversight that you engage in yourself for Tepco, the JapGuv and worldwide nuclear interests? Or is that a one way street?



posted on May, 1 2011 @ 02:23 PM
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reply to post by cabinda
 


It's highly doubtful that the mantle has any impact on the events as they are unfolding currently:

The thickness of the continental crust in northeast Japan is about 30 km beneath the land area (Research group for explosion …

[url=http://www.google.com/m/url?client=safari&ei=TbK9Tei5GaWksgfR5JWHAQ&hl=en&oe=UTF-8&q=http://scholar.lib.vt.edu/theses/public/etd-1410121010960314 0/etd.pdf&ved=0CB4QFjACOAo&usg=AFQjCNFBLb2r-BuojFN4koATQS29Z1f3ng]Source .PDF _/url]

Rather it is indicative of tunnels (trenches depending on the translation) that are connected Allowing contaminated water from other reactors to flow freely or there are problems not reported at reactor number six or (most likely) a combination ofthe two.



posted on May, 1 2011 @ 02:25 PM
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reply to post by mrbillshow
 


Nope. you weren't even in my widdle bwain


Go back and read my post. < I would say reread, but based on this post, you haven't read my post>. You will see, I was responding to an article I had found while researching...An article on censoring the messenger, regarding Fukushima.

It's not about you at all....though, you do seem to think, an awful lot of posts on this thread are directed to/at you. I only am responding, because you directed a question to me. See, that's how it works


For ease in your understanding my answer, here is the link to the article again...focustaiwan.tw...

Des



posted on May, 1 2011 @ 02:34 PM
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reply to post by Destinyone
 


Japanese unions may well call for an end to nuclear power in Japan, but the sorry truth of the matter is that, absent any immediately deployable alternatives, nuclear power is all that Japan can rely upn.

Japan has no natural resources; no coal, no oil, no natural gas, to speak of. The country imports all of its oil and gas.

There may be some limited geothermal resources, but they are not enough to supply the country's demand, and they come with the apparent risk of increased seismic activity,

Other alternate sources of power are too far off in the future to be of consequence.


The terrible dilema Japan is now facing is that to remain a "World Economic Power", Japan must continue to depend on Nuclear Power.



Medieval Ghost:


With regard to that official saying that there are "only 500 (iodine) pills in the entire country"...

Are you familiar with the theory behind the Panopticon, and how Foucault took that theory and showed how it might be applied in a highly disciplinary (or disciplined) society?


I think you would agree that, at least until recent events shook them to their cores, the Japanese engender a very disciplined society, Correct?

And we cannot doubt that the Japanese government would be all too willing to preserve, and encourage, the discipline and normalization of the society it was elected to reflect.


So, to maintain the "Everything is Fine. We have the situation under control. (Even if it wasn't and we didn't, there is nothing you can do about it so go about your business)" contrivance being foisted by the government, is it possible that this statement was made to prevent the Japanese people from seeking those pills, in (reportable) numbers?


The governemnt's theory being:

As long as the populace thinks that there aren't any pills available, they won't ask for any pills. And as long as they aren't asking for "anti-radiation" pills, we can report that the people are not worried about the (high levels) of radiation.

Especially since the people don't really know how high the radiation levels are becuase we haven't told them!


And, if we report that most people aren't worried about radiation, it makes those who are worried look like unpatriotic fools, encouraging them to keep quiet about their (very well grounded) fears.


Leaving us in the clear to try to cover this mess up!




And the Japanese people, being the highly disciplined society that it is, seeking at all times to normalize the given situation into one that can be neatly comparmentalized, and in due respect to Foucault's interpetation of the social Panopticon, buys into their government,s fairy tale.

Or at least, most do.

But that's all that is really needed, in a disciplined society!



posted on May, 1 2011 @ 02:36 PM
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Originally posted by cabinda
reply to post by Tworide
 


Hey


... thank you for all the good work...

quick question...and I do appreciate it is left field....please be gentle with your answers.....Is there any chance this could be related to radioactive materials/water leaking down through the bedrock...

Can poolium or the radioactive wash off have an effect on the mantle below the plant?



No, all these aftershocks are the from the two tectonic plates involved "readjusting" to the change in the stress pattern caused by the very large (over a very short period of time) relief of built up stress from the 9.0 quake. Depending on the research and where the measurements were taken, the relative movement between the plates at the surface of the fault (Japan Trench) where the rupture occurred was 30 to 80 ft horizontally and 8 to 30 ft vertically, over a 350~450 km stretch of the fault zone. The island of Honshu West of the epicenter has been reported to have moved 8 ft Eastward and dropped several feet These forces are so large that anything happening at Fukushima Dai-ichi is inconsequential, as far as the source of earthquakes is concerned.
This earthquake actually "shortened" the day by a few microseconds and tilted the earths axis by 10 inches. That's the awesome power of Ma Nature...

www.nasa.gov...
edit on 1-5-2011 by Tworide because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 1 2011 @ 02:38 PM
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reply to post by Bhadhidar
 


I do like the way your mind works. Of course, this makes total sense to me. Thank you for expressing it this way. It gives the ugly truth, a pretty rug to hide under no? While everyone just walks around, the mountain under the rug in the room.

Des



posted on May, 1 2011 @ 02:40 PM
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Originally posted by mrbillshow
A question for regular posters on this thread.

Are you willing to submit your own analysis and conclusions to the same rigorous oversight that you engage in yourself for Tepco, the JapGuv and worldwide nuclear interests? Or is that a one way street?


Anytime.

ALL the time.

Bring it on.



posted on May, 1 2011 @ 03:01 PM
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May. 1, 2011 10:13 AM ET

AP IMPACT: Ties bind Japan nuke sector, regulators

JUSTIN PRITCHARD, Associated Press
YURI KAGEYAMA, Associated Press


hosted2.ap.org/APDEFAULT/3d281c11a96b4ad082fe88aa0db04305/Article_2011-05-01-AS-Japan-Earthquake-Revolving-Door/id-b860690c9044458093e31aea8fa108 18


TOKYO (AP) — Nearly 10 years after Japan's top utility first assured the government that its Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plant was safe from any tsunami, regulators were just getting around to checking out the claim. The move was too little, too late.

But even if there had been scrutiny years before the fury of an earthquake-powered wave swamped the six atomic reactors at Fukushima on March 11, it is almost certain the government wouldn't have challenged the unrealistic analysis that Tokyo Electric Power Co. had submitted in 2001. An Associated Press review of Japan's approach to nuclear plant safety shows how closely intertwined relationships between government regulators and industry have allowed a culture of complacency to prevail.

Regulators simply didn't see it as their role to pick apart the utility's raw data and computer modeling to judge for themselves whether the plant was sufficiently protected from tsunami. The policy amounted to this: Trust plant operator TEPCO — and don't worry about verifying its math or its logic.

This kind of willful ignorance was not unique within a sympathetic bureaucracy at the Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry. The agency has multiple functions — some that can easily be viewed as having conflicting goals. The ministry is charged with touting the benefits of nuclear energy, selling Japanese technology to other countries — and regulating domestic nuclear plant safety.

Until January, it was led by a former engineer in the nuclear plant design section at Hitachi Ltd.

The ministry's promoter-regulator conflict makes Japan unusual among nuclear power-producing countries. The United States split those two functions nearly four decades ago with the closure of its Atomic Energy Commission; now the U.S. Department of Energy promotes nuclear power while the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission handles safety. France separated the two functions several years ago, removing its nuclear regulator from the government bureaucracy and making it an independent authority.

(...)

In a practice known in Japanese as amakudari, which translates as "descent from heaven," top government officials nearing the end of their careers land plum jobs within the industries they regulated, giving Japan's utilities intimate familiarity with their overseers. Meanwhile, top industry officials are appointed to positions on policy-shaping government advisory panels. Pre-tsunami promises to crack down on amakudari have yet to be fulfilled.

(...)

During nearly four years of panel discussions, the groups focused on issues such as plants' ability to withstand shaking, and measures of geological fault lines. Concern about nuclear plants being vulnerable to tsunami waves that have battered Japan following major quakes came up just once, according to AP's review of meeting records, interviews with several panel members and NISA's own accounting.

At a June 2009 meeting, Yukinobu Okamura, a tsunami expert at a major government institute, asked why his fellow panelists were excluding the massive Jogan tsunami in 869 A.D. from consideration of the kind of waves Fukushima Dai-ichi could face.

"I would like to ask why you have not touched on this at all," Okamura demanded of the panel. "I find it unacceptable."

A TEPCO official, identified only by his last name, Nishimura, retorted that damage from Jogan wasn't extensive — a claim Okamura rebutted.

The NISA official presiding over the panel ordered more discussions. That never happened.

(...)
___

Pritchard reported from Los Angeles. Associated Press writer Troy Thibodeaux in New Orleans and AP news researchers Barbara Sambriski in New York and Julie Reed in Charlotte, N.C., contributed to this report.



posted on May, 1 2011 @ 03:03 PM
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Originally posted by Bhadhidar
Japanese unions may well call for an end to nuclear power in Japan, but the sorry truth of the matter is that, absent any immediately deployable alternatives, nuclear power is all that Japan can rely upon.


There are many immediately available alternatives.

With the coastline available in Japan, tidal power and tunnel generation projects could supply more electricity in 20 years than nuclear does today, without danger to the people and environment of Japan and the world. And there are enormous geothermal resources.


When a tsunami takes out a portion of the tidal power system, nothing blows up... if there are no nuke plants.
edit on 1-5-2011 by Chakotay because: CLASSIFIED



posted on May, 1 2011 @ 03:25 PM
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So TEPCO thinks using more than one pump "might" work better....duh!


NHK Update : Fukushima-Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant Accident in Japan – May 1, 2011
– May 1, 2011Posted in: Pinoy Global Online News

TEPCO to accelerate transfer of radioactive water

The operator of the stricken Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant says it plans to speed up the removal of highly radioactive water from an underground tunnel connected to the No. 2 reactor building by doubling the number of pumps.

Huge amounts of highly radioactive water are hampering efforts to restore cooling functions to the plant’s reactors.

Tokyo Electric Power Company is using a single pump to transfer radioactive water from the No. 2 reactor building to a waste processing facility. It plans to start using 2 pumps on Saturday. It stopped the transfer for a while on Friday to check the facility and hoses for leaks.

TEPCO has pumped 2,400 tons of radioactive water out of the tunnel since April 19th. It hopes to double the flow to 20 tons per hour so as to transfer a total of 10,000 tons by mid-May.

TEPCO is also preparing to pump radioactive water out of an underground tunnel connected to the No. 3 reactor building. It’s connecting hoses between the tunnel and the waste processing facility.

The company is also considering burying a tank in the ground to store radioactive water in case the pumping does not go smoothly.


Double duh!



Huge amounts of highly radioactive water are hampering efforts to restore cooling functions to the plant’s reactors

filamimage.com...

Des



posted on May, 1 2011 @ 03:50 PM
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...ripple...ripple...ripple...more say a resounding NO to mixed signal orders from TPTB. Hell no, we won't go....


Bloomberg

Wagyu Farmers Defy Evacuation Order as Radiation Threatens Crop
By Aya Takada - May 1, 2011 11:01 AM ET

Takeshi Yamada frowns as he surveys his herd of 28 wagyu beef cattle, prized for their marbled meat and fetching as much as 1 million yen ($12,320) per head.

“The government told us to evacuate, but we don’t want to leave our cattle behind,” said the 62-year-old farmer in Iitate village in northern Japan. “If we’re forced to go, we are worried we won’t be able to come back and farm again.”

Iitate became a haven for refugees after the March 11 earthquake and tsunami triggered the worst nuclear crisis since Chernobyl by crippling the Fukushima Dai-Ichi nuclear power station 40 kilometers (25 miles) away. Now, the government is telling residents of Iitate and three other villages to leave by the end of May because contamination in soil and water has reached dangerous levels.

The latest evacuation order underscores how the ripple effects of what Prime Minister Naoto Kan called Japan’s biggest crisis since World War II continue to play out seven weeks after the record quake. Fukushima prefecture’s farming industry, worth 252 billion yen a year, is at stake. www.bloomberg.com...


Des



posted on May, 1 2011 @ 03:59 PM
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I know versions of this have been posted...here is another one to add to the pot.




Pressure on Kan as radiation safety aide quits

By Mure Dickie in Tokyo

Published: May 1 2011 17:43 | Last updated: May 1 2011 17:43

Japan’s prime minister has come under renewed criticism for his government’s handling of the crisis at the tsunami-crippled Fukushima Daiichi nuclear plant after a scientific adviser quit and an opinion poll showed voters doubting his leadership.

At an unusual Sunday parliamentary session in advance of Japan’s “Golden Week” holidays, opposition party Diet members grilled Naoto Kan, the prime minister, about the resignation of Toshiso Kosako, a radiation safety expert.

Prof Kosako announced his resignation at an emotional press conference late on Friday, during which he criticised the government for ad hoc and ineffective decision-making and for not imposing tighter radiation limits on school playgrounds in areas around the stricken atomic plant.

www.ft.com...


Des



posted on May, 1 2011 @ 04:02 PM
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reply to post by Chakotay
 


As I stated, although there are geothermal sources of energy available to Japan, tapping those sources has proven to be something of a seismic hair-trigger in other countries; the US included. Not something you might want to mess with too much in a country that is, itself, essentially one big fault line.

I agree, Tidal Power generation would be a much safer alternative to nuclear power for Japan, or anywhere else for that matter.

However, although the technolgy to produce electricity from the tides may be available immediately, the infrastructure to do so, in quantities sufficient to replace nuclear generation, is many years and many, many millions of Yen away.

I believe you stated, and I hope I didn't misunderstand you, "...in twenty years..."? Well that's a fine target to aim at, for certain. But what is Japan to do about its public and industrial power needs in the meantime?

Yes, your grandchildren's future may look clean and bright, lit with safe and environmentally responsible energy sources.

But, if you live in Japan, before they can have that bright future, you and your children will just have to live in the dark...Or put up with the dangerous Atom.



posted on May, 1 2011 @ 04:13 PM
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Japan lifts restrictions on milk supplies from areas near quake-hit nuke plant
12:44 01/05/2011


en.rian.ru/world/20110501/163807603.html


Japan's government has lifted restrictions on milk supplies from areas near the quake-stricken Fukushima nuclear power plant earlier imposed over radiation contamination concerns, the Japanese news agency Kyodo reported on Sunday, referring to top government spokesman Yukio Edano.

Restrictions have been lifted for milk producers in the towns of Minamisoma and Kawamata in the Fukushima prefecture, the agency reported.

(...)

MOSCOW, May 1 (RIA Novosti)



posted on May, 1 2011 @ 04:14 PM
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Originally posted by Bhadhidar
reply to post by Chakotay
 

But, if you live in Japan, before they can have that bright future, you and your children will just have to live in the dark...Or put up with the dangerous Atom.


No, you harness the power of the Negawatt...

Instead of your children not having an LED lamp to read by, they keep the LED reading lamp and the stupid neon advertising signs in Shibuya get banned, heated toilet seats are declared un-Japanese and so-on.

Sweaters become fashionable, and stupid video games give way to knitting.

You phase-in sustainable power and phase-out nuclear, while praying to the Tsunami gods for favor.

In other words, you Continue Operation Yashima.

It's a hard paradigm shift. The atom promised so much, and delivered less than it cost. Game over.




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