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Japan declares 'nuclear emergency' after quake

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posted on Mar, 14 2011 @ 08:37 PM
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Does anyone have any links to confirm the roof of reactor #4 damaged? I heard it talked about in the last press briefing but can not find anything on it...They were talking about the spent rods being there like on one of the other units as well.




posted on Mar, 14 2011 @ 08:40 PM
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Japan's Nuclear and Industrial Safety Agency says an explosion was heard early Tuesday morning at the No.2 reactor of the disaster-hit Fukushima No.1 nuclear power plant.              

Tokyo Electric Power Company says radiation levels reached 8,217 microsieverts per hour near the front gate of the Fukushima No.1 nuclear power station at 8:31 AM Tuesday. Anyone in this kind of environment would be exposed to more than 3 years' worth of naturally occurring radiation within a single hour.

Prime Minister Naoto Kan has set up a joint task force with Tokyo Electric Power Company to better deal with overheating nuclear fuel rods at the power plant.   

Source english.kyodonews.jp...

Ektar    
edit on 14-3-2011 by Ektar because: Forgot to add source



posted on Mar, 14 2011 @ 08:41 PM
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reply to post by EnhancedInterrogator
 

The Daily Show is always best coverage!!!
Second line



posted on Mar, 14 2011 @ 08:46 PM
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reply to post by Ektar
 

I just made some corrections to my previous outline post.
Corrections:

  • I got "Tokyo Electric Power Company" (aka TEPCO) and "Tohoku Electric Power" confused.
  • TEPCO owns/operates Fukushima (I and II) and Kashiwazaki-Kariwa.
  • "Tohoku Electric Power" owns/operates Onagawa.



posted on Mar, 14 2011 @ 08:51 PM
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Top down, of Fukushima nuke plant, after explosions.



edit on 14-3-2011 by Mianeye because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 14 2011 @ 08:57 PM
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reply to post by Mianeye
 


That would be before the latest explosion----I only see two buildings damaged in that pic.

Am I missing a damaged third building?
edit on 14-3-2011 by 00nunya00 because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 14 2011 @ 09:00 PM
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reply to post by 00nunya00
 
The third explosion was not outside, so there will be no damage to see.
I don't know when this picture was taken.




edit on 14-3-2011 by Mianeye because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 14 2011 @ 09:03 PM
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OK, this is not good news... sorry to be the bearer of bad news...

I have to say first that the following is my interpretation of reported events, and subject to the accuracy of those reports. Yes, I have experience in the construction/management of nuclear power, and I have pretty extensive study of nuclear technology, but I am not waving a PhD from MIT or anything like that.

So far it seems pretty evident that there has been a partial controlled meltdown at units #1 and #3. In order to maintain their status and allow them to safely shut down, coolant must be maintained until they can burn themselves out. This process could take days, weeks, or even months... and I feel days is a very unlikely prospect. If they cannot continue the cooling to remove the heat from the decaying uranium (and the byproducts as well), both reactors will melt down in an uncontrolled free-running reaction, melting the reactor vessel itself and exposing the surrounding area to lethal radiation.

Unit #2 appears to have sustained a crack. This crack will manifest itself two ways: firstly, it will leak a large amount of radiation into the surrounding area. Secondly, and more dire, it cannot be cooled without exposing the fuel to the atmosphere. This would release a massive amount of radiation at lethal levels into the surrounding area.

However, that is not the worst. If the reactor is not cooled, it will sustain an uncontrolled complete melt-down. This itself will melt the reactor vessel, resulting in the same massive radiation.

Japan is damned if they do and damned if they don't.

The levels around Unit #2 will skyrocket; the area will become uninhabitable very soon. I do not see how workers can continue to work to maintain reactors #1 and #3. That means we will shortly have three uncontrolled meltdowns.

There are only two things inside that reactor building that can possibly cause an explosion: chemicals (like hydrogen) and a catastrophic failure of a pressure vessel. The nuclear fuel cannot, under any situation, explode like a nuclear weapon. If, as has been reported, the explosion at Unit #2 was not caused by hydrogen, then it had to be a pressure explosion, and the main thing under pressure is: the reactor itself.

If, as it appears, there was a small crack in reactor #2 that was leaking water, then the continuing heat from the partial meltdown could have still been raising the pressure faster than the crack could relieve it. An uncontrolled build-up of pressure inside the reactor could cause a catastrophic failure of the reactor itself, especially since it already contained a compromised area (the original crack). This would lead to completely dry fuel rods and a complete meltdown, accompanied by massive releases of radioactive material.

I have been looking for a white plume of steam. That may not occur under this situation, since there was apparently little water surrounding the reactor core to begin with.

There will be gamma, beta, and neutron radiation from such an event. Like Chernobyl, this area will be uninhabitable for quite some time. As for exactly what will happen as a result of this event, I am afraid we are in uncharted territory here. It looks like we will get to test those meltdown proof floors after all.


I fear Japan has just lost at least part of the country.

For the US, without the plume of superheated steam, less neutron emission will rise into the atmosphere, meaning less chance of airborne contamination. That's the good news. The bad news is that with this massive a release, at least some of the I-131 could drift across the Pacific. It will decay some during the trip, and will also dissipate, so any dosages here should be low. The cesium, again, is practically irrelevant.

Plutonium or uranium will likely not affect any other countries, as they are pretty heavy elements and will not stay aloft long if they manage to get aloft in the first place.

Gamma radiation from the plants themselves will not affect any countries beyond Japan at all. There will be some associated with the I-131, but not a tremendous amount. Potassium iodide may be offered along the coast, mainly west of the cascade range; take advantage of it.

If anyone is in northern Japan... if you can get away from these plants, please do so now. Listen to the authorities; they know what type of radiation is being released and how much. Help each other; you are a proud and noble people and you are fighting a monster that would dwarf Godzilla, with a tenacity that should make you proud.

May God have mercy...

TheRedneck



posted on Mar, 14 2011 @ 09:03 PM
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New TEPCO press-release, so far only available in Japanese ...

Movement of staff of the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station

Here's rough translation, by way of Google-Translate of the above Japanese URL ...


Today Tokyo Electric Power Co., Inc. Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station on March 15, 2011, around 6:00 am, 14 minutes, and cause noise in the vicinity of the pressure suppression chamber Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station Unit 2, in the same room Since the pressure drop, determined that some abnormality may have occurred in the same room. In the future, but we will continue to work at full injection into the reactor pressure vessel, and start moving to a safe location of the plant and our temporary staff workers of the subcontractors do not work directly related to the for.
At present, Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station, in the rest of the staff, for ensuring safe, and committed.

The significant changes in the parameters of the reactor containment vessel and the reactor pressure vessel of Unit 2 is not seen.

Location, including local residents, and that everyone in society is for any inconvenience and we have a great worry, I apologize sincerely.

And over[...]


Note: As always, emphasis added to quote by poster (i.e. me).



posted on Mar, 14 2011 @ 09:04 PM
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Are you guys listening to this? PM Kan updating on the plant. Started with "please listen to my message calmly."



posted on Mar, 14 2011 @ 09:06 PM
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Prime Minister Kan confirms fire seen at reactor 4 plant number 1

Extending evac area around plant number 2


spent fuel rods in reactor 4 are burning

hole seen in number 2 reactor

high probibility containment vessel damaged reactor 2

400-600 milli- sieverts per hour is now the figures around the plant

all but 50 staff (to water inject) have been evac'd

evac extended to 30 km, stay indoors, do not use ventilation systems









Live press briefing



NHK
edit on 14-3-2011 by okiecowboy because: update

edit on 14-3-2011 by okiecowboy because: update

edit on 14-3-2011 by okiecowboy because: update

edit on 14-3-2011 by okiecowboy because: update

edit on 14-3-2011 by okiecowboy because: update



posted on Mar, 14 2011 @ 09:11 PM
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I hate to fearmonger but if i was in japan, i would get the heck out now. This is very, very bad. They can claim all they want that they're pumping seawater in, but look at how that's went so far. It's a lost cause. These people are true heros but i think time is up. They've done all they can with what they have. They need to get out while they still can.
edit on 3/14/2011 by JackBauer because: (no reason given)

edit on 3/14/2011 by JackBauer because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 14 2011 @ 09:17 PM
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CNN is confirming fire at reactor #4 with Japan's officials saying now a high risk of further leaking. High risk is a new word in their vocabulary that should not be taken lightly based on prior announcements. How very, very sad this is. Prayers for Japan.



posted on Mar, 14 2011 @ 09:22 PM
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Originally posted by 00nunya00
Are you guys listening to this? PM Kan updating on the plant. Started with "please listen to my message calmly."

What the heck is an "ordinary fire" in a nuclear power plant? Isnt any sort of fire bad at this point? he's trying to sound less than grim but its failing.



posted on Mar, 14 2011 @ 09:22 PM
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reply to post by TheRedneck
 


Thank you for sticking with us and helping us to understand this situation. I have felt a lot less "lost in the woods" knowing we can trust what you say, because you're not professing to have all the answers. What you know you've shared, and I for one appreciate it.

Please stick with us until this is over! Now, more than ever, we need good information, and not the BS we're getting on the teevee.



posted on Mar, 14 2011 @ 09:23 PM
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reply to post by irsuccubus
 


From what I gathered, he was saying it was the spent fuel rods stored in the #4 that are on fire?

Did anyone else get that?



posted on Mar, 14 2011 @ 09:23 PM
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Very sad !!! I can't even imagine.. radiation is the worst way to go. Slow and excruciatingly painful death. There is no fear mongering anymore.. it's real. You are in denial if you say otherwise. There WILL be many ppl dying of the radiation poisoning (if there haven't been many already). And the fact that others already came down with radiation sickness means radiation was let out in dangerous doses a while ago.

Personally, if I was in Japan, and had the means to leave.. I would.



posted on Mar, 14 2011 @ 09:23 PM
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reply to post by TheRedneck
 

Thanks for putting that in concise, specific, meaningful terms.
I'd like to thank all the folks here that have been contributing in many ways:
  • Tracking-down and posting news from reputable sources.
  • Tracking-down and posting details from "official" / "powers-that-be" stories.
  • Posting under-ground or alternative leads that seem relevant, but keeping it "real".
  • People with industry experience jumping-in and trying to interpret what get's posted.
  • The great concern and professionalism (mostly) displayed by everybody involved - especially considering most of us are not "journalists" by trade.

Some of us came into this thread, to debunk and calm people down.
Others came here, in the hope of finding out things weren't as bad as they sounded.
Others maybe game here, expecting the usual conspiracy-banter.
Somewhere along the way, we were able to reality-check each other and perhaps serve some more communal purpose.
And yes, along the way, we poked a few jokes - but just enough to lighten the mood.

At the very least, what we have accomplished is a record or rational thought to an on-going crisis, and been a source for ATS lurkers to come to from some (hopefully) "qualified" information - the "official" story, plus what appears different than the official story, and the analysis and interpretation of both.

I don't "own" this thread by any means (though it may seem like it from time to time - I may have posted a personal record on this thread). Hell, I didn't even start this thread. I just saw it, and thought the subject-matter was important enough to warrant way more attention and analysis that the MSM was giving it at that time. Now that the situation (regrettably) has actually evolved into a problem of "Godzilla-like" proportions (please forgive the analogy), I'm sure the MSM will be more on the job. Better late than never, I guess.

I wish the final outcome of this event was going to be better than it appears that it will likely be. I suspect that's the sentiment of all the participants here.

edit on 2011-3-14 by EnhancedInterrogator because: spelling, grammar, formatting, etc.



posted on Mar, 14 2011 @ 09:24 PM
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They really seem to be dodging questions about the #2 reactor.

I'm not sure if they just don't know much, or if it's really that bad.



posted on Mar, 14 2011 @ 09:24 PM
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reply to post by TheRedneck
 


hey Redneck thanks for your report. I live in the So.Cal. area and listen to a radio show that was interviewing a Engineer in the Nuke Reactor field. I think I heard them said he sells them.
Among the things he said was, The explosions we saw were not from inside the reactors. Said was they were Hydrogen Sulfide gas explosions.....but my mind says if the explosion was buildup of gas from the hot rods then how does it blow from outside the reactor? Do you follow my question? I was thinking he was giving a cover story. Also he said the reactors dont operate over 550 degrees and sence they were shut down then they should be cooling...can you shed light if you can understand anything my mixed up mind thinks it has heard.... as always we just want the TRUTH....hey Thanks for your input.
edit on 14-3-2011 by mikeybiznaz because: one really should proof read before hitting reply




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