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Japan declares 'nuclear emergency' after quake

page: 81.htm
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posted on Mar, 14 2011 @ 07:28 PM
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reply to post by okiecowboy
 


Everything normal in Tokyo about radiation level




posted on Mar, 14 2011 @ 07:28 PM
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They said that half the length of the fuel rods are exposed in unit 2 , Ummm ... what they didnt say is they have been since yesterday . Which means they are melted and are at the bottom of the inner containment vessel . Or at the bottom of the suppression chamber . That would mean full melt down , Im not sure. Is this possible without a huge explosion redneck?



posted on Mar, 14 2011 @ 07:34 PM
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reply to post by bluemooone2
 


To me it sounds like (just a guess on my part) it sounds like the molten core hit the suppression pool..that would explain the noise would it not? It so hard trying to figure this out...seems like most of the broadcasts from the area are just chopped up bits and parts that add to the confusion



posted on Mar, 14 2011 @ 07:36 PM
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reply to post by okiecowboy
 


Thats what im getting too. Then wont be long until a huge pressure explosion if this is true. Although Im not even sure about that as it may just begin to melt though the outer containment.
edit on 14-3-2011 by bluemooone2 because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 14 2011 @ 07:40 PM
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Can someone please explain how they plan on fixing this issue? How can they possibly work on fixing it when they are likely to explode at any time?

Or is there another way without getting close?

Thanks. Im not really that good with all this stuff so its good to get information.



posted on Mar, 14 2011 @ 07:45 PM
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Is reasonable to assume that if containment is breached in reactor #2, and a subsequent explosion occurs, given the relatively close proximity of the other reactors we may see a domino effect with other reactors?
edit on 14-3-2011 by odd1out because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 14 2011 @ 07:45 PM
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reply to post by NumberEight
 

What they have been saying all along..in fact its the only fix I have heard for any reactor is "more seawater"
If in fact the core has melted and breached the reactor, and is in the suppresion pool,, and If in fact it is damaged like they think.....not sure it is fixable without just building a concrete tomb or something ..



posted on Mar, 14 2011 @ 07:46 PM
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The only thing they can do now, is to "control" the meltdown, by cooling, and pray that the inner container don't break.

They say posible meltdown, cause no one has seen it.
It's based on remote readings, and they have not lied about anything.

Actualy i think they do the best they can, to keep us updated.



posted on Mar, 14 2011 @ 07:47 PM
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reply to post by okiecowboy
 


Yep, thats the thought i have also.

With regards to pumping water and the explosions, yes that will happen as water breaks down into hydrogen and oxygen, and with something that hot will ignite. And also i guess the explosion might be due to fuel or melted rods hitting the containment chamber creating excess pressure.



posted on Mar, 14 2011 @ 07:48 PM
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reply to post by odd1out
 
I would think that is very reasonable to assume..given the fact that we have damage at reactor 1, 2,3,4 to some extent...and If radiation levels are getting higher..they will all be almost impossible to take care of..
just my 2 cents tho



posted on Mar, 14 2011 @ 07:51 PM
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Ok thanks for the replies. I guess its damage limitation time them.



posted on Mar, 14 2011 @ 08:01 PM
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Disclaimer(s)
This does not include all nuclear power plants in Japan, just the plants (or operating company's) that have come-up for discussion so far. Of course, all this information is coming from "official" (or Powers-That-Be) sources, such as the companies that are the owner/operators. The assumption, is that information from their press releases is at least delayed (i.e. not real-time), and fixed for political-correctness. Obviously, there is discussion about how bad things are (compared to the "official" story). So, presuambly the "official" story is the "best case" scenario. Where possible, both Wikipedia and Company links are provided below.

Corrections:

  • I got "Tokyo Electric Power Company" (aka TEPCO) and "Tohoku Electric Power" confused.
  • TEPCO owns/operates Fukushima (I and II) and Kashiwazaki-Kariwa.
  • "Tohoku Electric Power" owns/operates Onagawa.

Here's a hiearchial quick-reference that you may find helpful:

  • TEPCO-operated Nuclear Plants:

    • Wikipedia Page: link
    • Company Web-Page (English): link
    • Company Web-Page (Japanese): link
    • Press-Release Page (English): link
    • Press-Release Page (Japanese): link
    • Nuclear Plant: Fukushima Fukushima Daiichi / Fukushima I

      • On the East coast of Japan.
      • This site was apparently hit by Tsunami - apparently badly based on before/after arial photos.
      • Possibly, it's local generators (used to run the cooling systems when shutting-down) were wiped out by the tsunami.
      • This is where most of the focus is, due to hydrogen explosions (and possibly larger issues) at the site.
      • Six reactors on-site. (two more have been proposed).

        • Reactor #1: Major issues. Hydrogen explosion on Saturday. Presumed partial melt-down. Presumed "contained" (for now)?
        • Reactor #2: Major issues. Undetermined explosion Monday. Presumed partial melt-down. Based on recent press-conference there are "leaks". So, "containment" is breached at some level.
        • Reactor #3: Major issues. Hydrogen explosion on Sunday. Presumed partial melt-down. Presumed "contained" (for now)?
        • Reactor #4: No reported issues. Was already off-line for inspection ("cold" presumably) before the quake.
        • Reactor #5: No reported issues. Was already off-line for inspection ("cold" presumably) before the quake.
        • Reactor #6: No reported issues. Was already off-line for inspection ("cold" presumably) before the quake.


    • Nuclear Plant: Fukushima Daini / Fukushima II

      • On the East coast of Japan.
      • Presumed hit by Tsunami.
      • There seem to be some concerns about this site, but (for now) seems "under-control".
      • This site has access to "offsite-power", presumably being used to run their reacgtor cooling systems.
      • Four reactors on-site.

        • Reactor #1: Previously reported issues with "cooling" system. "Cold" shut-down reported on Monday.
        • Reactor #2: Previously reported issues with "cooling" system. "Cold" shut-down in progress (as of Monday's press release)
        • Reactor #3: Previously reported issues with "cooling" system. "Cold" shut-down reported on Saturday.
        • Reactor #4: Previously reported issues with "cooling" system. "Cold" shut-down in progress (as of Monday's press release)


    • Nuclear Plant: Kashiwazaki-Kariwa

      • On the West coast of Japan.
      • Presumed not hit by Tsunami.
      • No reports from owner/operator (Tepco) about any on-going issues at this site.
      • Seven reactors on-site.

        • Reactor #1: No reported issues.
        • Reactor #2: No reported issues.
        • Reactor #3: No reported issues.
        • Reactor #4: No reported issues.
        • Reactor #5: No reported issues.
        • Reactor #6: No reported issues.
        • Reactor #7: No reported issues.


    • Tohoku-operated Nuclear Plants:

      • Wikipedia Page: link
      • Company Web-Page (English): link
      • Company Web-Page (Japanese): link
      • Press-Release Page (English): [see company Japanese page above]
      • Press-Release Page (Japanese): [see company Japanese page above]
      • Nuclear Plant: Onagawa

        • On the East coast of Japan.
        • Presumed hit by Tsunami.
        • No reports from owner/operator (Tepco) about any on-going issues at this site.
        • There were rumors of issues at this plant, but at least some of that was confusion about the earlier fire.
        • Higher than normal radioation levels were also reported at this plant (at one point).
        • The company claims those readings were actually due to the releases (at about that time) from the Fukushima Daiichi plant.
        • Three reactors on-site.

          • Reactor #1: This reactor has been off-line since 2006.
          • Reactor #2: No reported issues.
          • Reactor #3: There was a fire with the "turbines" associated with this reactor on Friday, since put out.



    • JAPC-operated Nuclear Plants:

      • Wikipedia Page: link
      • Company Web-Page (English): link
      • Company Web-Page (Japanese): link
      • Press-Release Page (English): [see company Japanese page above]
      • Press-Release Page (Japanese): [see company Japanese page above]
      • Nuclear Plant: Tokai

        • On the East coast of Japan.
        • Presumed hit by Tsunami.
        • No reports from owner/operator (Tepco) about any on-going issues at this site.
        • Rumors (so far unsubstantiated) there had been some issues at this site.
        • Two reactors on-site (one decomissioned).

          • Reactor #1: Decomissioned in 2006. In the process of being dismantled.
          • Reactor #2: No reported issues.


      • Nuclear Plant: Tsuruga

        • On the West coast of Japan.
        • Presumed not hit by Tsunami.
        • No reports from owner/operator (Tepco) about any on-going issues at this site.
        • Two reactors on-site (two more are still under-construction).
        • There are also coal-burning generators at the same plant.

          • Reactor #1: No reported issues.
          • Reactor #2: No reported issues.




    Obviously, if there is a company or goverment source we can site that would change what I have posted here, let me know so we can get it updated.
    The goal of this is not to try to explain everything that might be going-on, just to get some basic facts out about the site's involved.
    Hope this helps!

    edit on 2011-3-14 by EnhancedInterrogator because: spelling, grammar, formatting, etc.



posted on Mar, 14 2011 @ 08:06 PM
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Pretty much every scenario I've heard discussed so far, hell, that I've ever heard discussed always involved just one, count 'em, one reactor melting down.

Now we're looking at three currently melted or melting with another three endangered on the same site.

I think we're going to have scale up our thinking a bit.

Par for course for this disaster, unfortunately.



posted on Mar, 14 2011 @ 08:08 PM
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The past few days I've been trying to be a voice of calm since (at that time) there was no need for serious concern, although the plant was having difficulty the main containment structures were holding together.

Now that #2 has had a breach I'm officially frightened. I still haven't heard a good explanation of what was different with this explosion but this just feels different & does not feel good.



posted on Mar, 14 2011 @ 08:09 PM
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reply to post by EnhancedInterrogator
 

This one have a massive news update on most event.
Lots of info in text.
There will be a new update soon.

hisz.rsoe.hu...



posted on Mar, 14 2011 @ 08:15 PM
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Redneck was called away... back now and catching up.

TheRedneck



posted on Mar, 14 2011 @ 08:17 PM
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reply to post by ethancoop
 


I had tried to maintain a mindset similar to yours. However, as this thing has unfolded with the continuous ups and downs, my timid disposition has been thrown into the washing machine. This is becoming the never ending roller coaster ride, and sadly if it is indeed confirmed that the reactor containment structure has been breached this roller coaster is about to venture off the tracks. That containment structure is the last line of defense. I hope I am wrong and the structural integrity has been maintained. However, as more information trickles down it seems the Japanese engineers have lost the war? This is indeed a very serious crisis.
edit on 14-3-2011 by Jakes51 because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 14 2011 @ 08:25 PM
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Japan is counting on four to eight inches of super strong steel to prevent the crisis at its stricken nuclear plant from becoming a radioactive disaster. www.reuters.com



posted on Mar, 14 2011 @ 08:30 PM
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Just got back from fleshing out my emergency food supplies, duct tape, plastic sheeting, etc. I suggest you all do the same. It NEVER hurts to be prepared for disaster. None of the supplies you buy will be a waste; they can be repurposed if they reach the end of their shelf life.

Here is FEMA's guide to disaster preparedness. Browse the nuclear sections and have the supplies on hand. You live downwind of a nuclear plant, no matter where you are in the world.



posted on Mar, 14 2011 @ 08:32 PM
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Ok, don't get me wrong.... I love Yojo Ono ... but seriously? Can we have Speed Walker back?

Why can't CNN pull-together a decent "panel" to discuss this stuff?
I'm going to be really pissed if The Daily Show's coverage tonight (and tomorrow night) is better.

edit on 2011-3-14 by EnhancedInterrogator because: spelling, grammar, formatting, etc.




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