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Japan declares 'nuclear emergency' after quake

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posted on Mar, 14 2011 @ 03:07 PM
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reply to post by Topato
 



Looks like Potassium Iodide might help us West Coasters from developing cancer should the radiation cloud hit us.
Only cancer of the thyroid.

It will not help prevent other cancers or leukemia.




posted on Mar, 14 2011 @ 03:09 PM
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I am allergic to the iodine for CT scans, and also iodine pills for urinary tract infections.
Does this mean I would also be allergic to iodide ?



posted on Mar, 14 2011 @ 03:10 PM
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The head of the International Atomic Energy Agency says the Japanese government has asked for experts to help with an imperiled nuclear plant.

Plunging water levels left uranium rods completely exposed today -- and although the water was restored, the rods are again exposed after a second episode. That increases the risk that radiation will spread -- and that there may eventually be a meltdown.

A top Japanese official said the fuel rods in all three of the most troubled reactors at the site appeared to be melting.


www.wzzm13.com...
edit on 14-3-2011 by burntheships because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 14 2011 @ 03:11 PM
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reply to post by amatrine
 


No, very few people are allergic to iodide because that's what your thyroid produces from iodine. Most people are not actually allergic to the iodine, but rather the bromine detox afterwards. Even those who are allergic/sensitive to iodine usually are fine with iodide.

ETA: do NOT take this advice without consulting your doctor first. I am not a medical professional.
edit on 14-3-2011 by 00nunya00 because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 14 2011 @ 03:12 PM
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I finally had some time to go through and try to illustrate some of why I say the heat is not latent, but a controlled meltdown.

Source: www.bbc.co.uk...

This schematic shows how a typical nuclear reactor works. The control rods are in a matrix which exactly matches the matrix of fuel rods... accurate to 0.0001" (one ten-thousandth of an inch) in the US. The tolerances between fuel and control rods are one the order of thousandths of an inch. The fit is exact.

The actual rods are shown in this picture, from www.bluecastleproject.com...


As you can see, the fuel rods are packed tightly, allowing just enough room for the control rods to move between them and no more. What happens during a meltdown is that the fuel rods melt... turn to liquid... and this causes them to no longer be separated by the control rods. Even if the control rods are engaged prior to the meltdown, the fact that liquid fuel has flowed around them makes them much less effective at slowing the reaction.

This is why I continue to state that this is not latent heat, but a controlled meltdown.

The one thing that is not shown in the first drawing is the heat exchange system. Turbine steam never enters the reactor... it runs through a heat exchanger that also connects the cool water in and hot water out. Under normal operation, there is never a connection between outside water and the reactor water, which is highly radioactive. In an emergency, water can be added to the reactor vessel itself, but the opening of these valves is an automatic 'incident'.

There are also relief valves at the top of the reactor vessel which can be used in an emergency to release pressure. Again, operation of these valves is an automatic 'incident'.

The flooding of the reactor for cooling that is being referenced is not pumping water inside the reactor itself; it is sending water through these heat exchangers. Water is only added to the reactor vessel in order to keep the rods submerged. Pressure is only vented in order to keep the reactor vessel from cracking. Both operations, primarily the venting, release some radiation, but they are necessary in an emergency to prevent a complete release of all radioactivity and a complete uncontrolled meltdown.

TheRedneck



posted on Mar, 14 2011 @ 03:12 PM
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For anybody interesting the technical details, I found this PDF on Tepco's English site ....
Nuclear Power (PDF) English

I has details about each reactor at all three of Tepco's current nuclear plants. There are more nuclear plants in Japan that that, but only three that Tepco owns/operates.

Here's an excerpt about their plans for MOX conversion:

(3) Outline plan for Plutonium Utilization in Light Water Reactors (MOX utilization)
Plutonium utilization in light water reactors refers to utilizing plutonium in the present nuclear power plants (light water reactors) using MOX fuel, which mixes uranium with plutonium. The electric power industry as a while is planning to start up utilization of MOX fule in 16 to 18 LWR plants by FY 2015. The plan for MOX fuel utilization in LWRs will play a vitally important role in securing a stable supply of engery in Japan, a resource poor country, in the future.



posted on Mar, 14 2011 @ 03:12 PM
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Originally posted by amatrine
I am allergic to the iodine for CT scans, and also iodine pills for urinary tract infections.
Does this mean I would also be allergic to iodide ?


I have the same allergy. I currently have a call into my Doctor's office to ask about just this issue. When I get a reply, I will share the answer given here, since I'm not the only one with the iodine allergy.


ETA: We know it's the iodine in my case for certain because I have terrible reactions as well to fish, iodized salt, sea salt, and swimming in salt water.
edit on 14-3-2011 by ProvehitoInAltum because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 14 2011 @ 03:25 PM
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For all you who are worried to much this is a plant who detect radiation





There is experimental evidence from an antinuclear group in Japan that a certain species of Spiderwort plant shows effects of radiation exposure when the radiation is not detectable by any instruments. This indicates that biologically sensitive is much greater than currently assumed or else that some types of radiation which are capable of biological effects exist which cannot be detected by electronic means and are not allowed for conventional theory.



The stamens of the Spiderwort flower are usually blue or blue-purple. In the presence of radiation, however, the stamens turn pink Common Spiderwort (Tradescantia bracteata) Found throughout all but the extreme northern counties of North Dakota, common Spiderwort is a striking plant. Elsewhere, the species ranges from Montana to Kansas eastward to Michigan and Indiana.

www.gdr.org...



posted on Mar, 14 2011 @ 03:30 PM
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# 2001: A senior nuclear industry executive has told the New York Times that Japanese nuclear power industry managers are "basically in a full-scale panic". The executive is not involved in managing the response to the reactors' difficulties but has many contacts in Japan. "They're in total disarray, they don't know what to do," the executive added.



# 2022: A Russian diplomatic source has told the Interfax news agency that Moscow is "awaiting trustworthy information regarding the situation at Japanese nuclear power plants" from the authorities in Tokyo. The source said Russian officials had not ruled out that the Japanese were playing down the possible threat for fear of causing panic among members of the public. Moscow planned to send seismologists to Japan to assess the situation on the ground so it could be "a thousand times more sure that everything is safe", the source added.


BBC
edit on 14-3-2011 by 00nunya00 because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 14 2011 @ 03:31 PM
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Crisis continues at Fukushima nuclear plant


Despite its earlier attempt to do so, however, water levels sharply fell and the fuel rods were fully exposed for about 140 minutes in the evening as a fire pump to pour cooling seawater into the reactor ran out of fuel



Prior to the second full exposure of the rods around 11 p.m., radiation was detected at 9:37 p.m. at a level twice the maximum seen so far -- 3,130 micro sievert per hour, according to TEPCO.



Since the magnitude 9.0 quake hit northeastern Japan last Friday, some reactors at the Fukushima No. 1 plant have lost their cooling functions, leading to brief rises in radiation levels.

As a result, the cores of the No. 1 and No. 3 reactors have partially melted.



posted on Mar, 14 2011 @ 03:34 PM
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Originally posted by ethancoop

Originally posted by monica86
I don't know if you are aware, there was a news conference
At one of the reactors, a safety valve shut and it now prevents pressure from being released and water from being poured into the reactor. They are trying to find a way to open the valve
edit on 14-3-2011 by monica86 because: (no reason given)


can't relieve pressure, can't get coolant in? that's not good at all. not one bit.


Ok, I found some clarifications on this
The valve has been re-opened a couple of hours ago

it stayed shut for a couple of hours...during which time the fuel rods were fully exposed

content.usatoday.com...

Does any of you guys know what happend to the 7 operators at the plant who went missing during mondays explosions? (how can they have gone missing, I wonder...)
edit on 14-3-2011 by monica86 because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 14 2011 @ 03:35 PM
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Well, this is John Large talking here,



“EXPERT DOUBTS GOVERNMENT­...

Nuclear expert John Large today questioned Fukushima'­s '4' status, telling The First Post: "We're not getting the informatio­n out of the government but I would say this is a significan­t nuclear event. You don't blow the top off a building and say it's not."

Japanese Cabinet Secretary Yukio Edano said today that there was the possibilit­y of an explosion at the No 3 reactor but he was confident the steel containing vessel around the core of the reactor would withstand the blast – as it did when No 1 reactor blew up on Saturday.
Large said he found this hard to believe.

The "jellyfish­" shape of Saturday's explosion and the decision to vent the reactor's secondary containmen­t – releasing radioactiv­e vapour and necessitat­ing the evacuation of local people – all suggest fuel rods had melted and leaked from the primary containmen­t.”
Source

edit on 14-3-2011 by burntheships because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 14 2011 @ 03:35 PM
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Originally posted by TheRedneck
The flooding of the reactor for cooling that is being referenced is not pumping water inside the reactor itself; it is sending water through these heat exchangers. Water is only added to the reactor vessel in order to keep the rods submerged. Pressure is only vented in order to keep the reactor vessel from cracking. Both operations, primarily the venting, release some radiation, but they are necessary in an emergency to prevent a complete release of all radioactivity and a complete uncontrolled meltdown.
TheRedneck

So, the media is either mis-informed, or over-simplifying things when they report things like seawater being pumped into the reactor cores?



posted on Mar, 14 2011 @ 03:37 PM
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reply to post by monica86
 


They were all accounted for, and the number rose to 11. Russia was saying they died, but I think that was a translation issue or something.

(We don't have to source info that's become part of the public knowledge right? Like I don't have to keep sourcing the magnitude of the quake or the explosions or whatnot, right?)



posted on Mar, 14 2011 @ 03:39 PM
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Originally posted by 00nunya00
reply to post by monica86
 


They were all accounted for, and the number rose to 11. Russia was saying they died, but I think that was a translation issue or something.

(We don't have to source info that's become part of the public knowledge right? Like I don't have to keep sourcing the magnitude of the quake or the explosions or whatnot, right?)


Ok, thanks.I am glad. I was aware there were 11 of them, but the i had heard that out of 11, 7 were missing.



posted on Mar, 14 2011 @ 03:41 PM
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reply to post by burntheships
 


Wow, good stuff. Thanks for that.

Kind of nice to be ahead of the media, eh?



posted on Mar, 14 2011 @ 04:01 PM
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Originally posted by burntheships
Well, this is John Large talking here,



“EXPERT DOUBTS GOVERNMENT­...

Nuclear expert John Large today questioned Fukushima'­s '4' status, telling The First Post: "We're not getting the informatio­n out of the government but I would say this is a significan­t nuclear event. You don't blow the top off a building and say it's not."

Japanese Cabinet Secretary Yukio Edano said today that there was the possibilit­y of an explosion at the No 3 reactor but he was confident the steel containing vessel around the core of the reactor would withstand the blast – as it did when No 1 reactor blew up on Saturday.
Large said he found this hard to believe.

The "jellyfish­" shape of Saturday's explosion and the decision to vent the reactor's secondary containmen­t – releasing radioactiv­e vapour and necessitat­ing the evacuation of local people – all suggest fuel rods had melted and leaked from the primary containmen­t.”
Source

edit on 14-3-2011 by burntheships because: (no reason given)


Indeed . Three mile Island was a 5 status. This is a 4 ??? No I do not think so.



posted on Mar, 14 2011 @ 04:04 PM
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Originally posted by TheRedneck
reply to post by RickyD

The thing I am watching for is a massive plume of white smoke (steam) rising quickly. the water level inside the reactor is held in check by the pressure. If that pressure is suddenly relieved, all the water available will flash to steam instantaneously, and then you will see spontaneous ignition of anything flammable in the area as there will be nothing to stop the chain reaction.

TheRedneck


Anything like the picture in this other thread? Or is that still small in comparison to what would/could happen if it were in full meltdown?

ATS link

Credits to downtown36 for that thread and the picture, I just happened to come across it and I remember you posting this a while back. You have to click on the link to see the entire picture and the actual reactor

Michelle



posted on Mar, 14 2011 @ 04:08 PM
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About flooding the reactors: I think there is only two cooling loops, primary and socondary and sea water is supposed to circulate the secondary one. So now they actually are pumping the salty stuff right into the core.

My opinion of the overall situation is that all three Fukiushima reactors have melted down badly and are leaking radioactive materials into air with steam and into the Pacific also, as the amount of sea water is too big to store. So they are polluting, but better to do it in a controlled fashion than let the molten core splash around on the concrete. If it melts through the reactor, as I believe at least the number #2 will, larger amounts of nasty fission products might go airborne in a random steam explosion.

Nice notification that the control rods are a tight fit! Because of that, the earthquake had to damage the fuel matrix in other power plans so, that it takes some maintenance before they can be put online. At the moment half of the 52 japanese reactors are shut down! (If I'm still updated...)

edit on 14-3-2011 by Styrge because: typos



posted on Mar, 14 2011 @ 04:12 PM
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Al Jazeera video broadcast just gave another update on japan nuclear situation and said the fuel rods in all three Fukushima nuclear cores appear to be exposed to the air, and the fuel rods in all three are assumed to be melting.

I can't find any news articles yet, that have substantiated this.




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