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Japan declares 'nuclear emergency' after quake

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posted on Mar, 14 2011 @ 02:17 PM
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reply to post by Erasurehead
 


And here also, however its worded slightly different.


www.navytimes.com...

an official explained that low levels of radiation were detected in the air and on aircraft flying near the plant, a discovery that prompted the ships to move to a position away from the plume’s downwind path. The Reagan was at sea, around 100 miles northeast of the Fukushima Dai-Ichi Nuclear power plant, when the hazardous material was discovered......

....Ships in the carrier’s strike group, including the cruiser Chancellorsville, the destroyer Preble, the combat support ship Bridge and destroyers Fitzgerald, John S. McCain, McCampbell and Curtis Wilbur, are all expected to operate off the east coast of Honshu, the largest Japanese island. The destroyer Mustin is south of the power plant.

“We will watch the winds closely in the coming days and move our ships and aircraft as necessary to avoid the windline in Fukushima,” Burke wrote.




posted on Mar, 14 2011 @ 02:22 PM
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Hi again everyone. Back on-line, but only briefly.
I'm a little confused about something, trying to go back and read the posts and news seems to be saying something different about the status of the reactor's at the Fukushima Dai-ichi plant.

Saturday there was a hydrogen explosion at reactor #1.
Sunday there was a hydrogen explosion at reactor #3.
Was there an hydrogen explosion at reactor #2 Monday? or another explosion at reactor #3?



posted on Mar, 14 2011 @ 02:25 PM
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#Japan overwhelmed by #tsunami dead; at least 1000 bodies found along shore; crematoriums can't handle numbers of dead

source



posted on Mar, 14 2011 @ 02:26 PM
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reply to post by EnhancedInterrogator
 


pretty sure the third explosion was at a non-nuclear plant, but im in the process of getting caught up as well.



posted on Mar, 14 2011 @ 02:27 PM
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Two hydrogen explosions have happened, at reactors 1 and 3.



posted on Mar, 14 2011 @ 02:27 PM
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One explosion at no.1 reactor and two at no.3 reactor also a fuel truck exploded at the thermal power plant not sure of it's location...source any live coverage.
edit on 14-3-2011 by RickyD because: (no reason given)


ETA: reactor no.3 is the MOX reactor!!!
edit on 14-3-2011 by RickyD because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 14 2011 @ 02:32 PM
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Japan Earthquake Ichihara Oil Refinery Huge Explosion

happens at :20 seconds

www.youtube.com...
edit on 14-3-2011 by Deathstarr54054 because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 14 2011 @ 02:36 PM
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reply to post by burntheships
 


But that does not cover what has dispersed into the sea. It is going to be by both I fear.



posted on Mar, 14 2011 @ 02:36 PM
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Can I ask if anyone knows...

Once a partial meltdown is happening, if water (coolant) is pumped back into the reactor, will those melted rods start to cool and turn back into solid matter? or will a total meltdown have to occur.

Its just that I'm sure I read somewhere that the rods, once liquefied can actually return to solid material?

Forgive me if I'm wrong, this is my first real look into the world of nuclear power sources.



posted on Mar, 14 2011 @ 02:40 PM
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Originally posted by ceekay
Can I ask if anyone knows...

Once a partial meltdown is happening, if water (coolant) is pumped back into the reactor, will those melted rods start to cool and turn back into solid matter? or will a total meltdown have to occur.

Its just that I'm sure I read somewhere that the rods, once liquefied can actually return to solid material?

Forgive me if I'm wrong, this is my first real look into the world of nuclear power sources.

You are correct. This is what happened at Three Mile island.



posted on Mar, 14 2011 @ 02:43 PM
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reply to post by bluemooone2
 


So if these guys at the plant could get sufficient water into the reactors then a total meltdown could be avoided?

So 'not all is lost' at the minute then.

I can't understand why they haven't managed to bring in some sort of machinery that could help. Surely they must have something that would work to pump water in or round the reactor. And whatever it is, they could have more on standby just in case.

I know, obviously it's just not 'that easy'!



posted on Mar, 14 2011 @ 02:48 PM
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Originally posted by GullibleUnderlord
radiation levels have doubled at the front gate of the plant source cnn
audio


To put it into perspective they also said that's about as much as a CAT scan. So basically it's the equivalent of a CAT scan per hour of exposure. Also keep in mind that's at the front gate of the plant. Most people would be getting an exposure well farther out than that which should be less the further you go.
edit on 14-3-2011 by ethancoop because: (no reason given)

edit on 14-3-2011 by ethancoop because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 14 2011 @ 02:49 PM
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I don't know if you are aware, there was a news conference
At one of the reactors, a safety valve shut and it now prevents pressure from being released and water from being poured into the reactor. They are trying to find a way to open the valve
edit on 14-3-2011 by monica86 because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 14 2011 @ 02:51 PM
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Originally posted by monica86
I don't know if you are aware, there was a news conference
At one of the reactors, a safety valve shut and it now prevents pressure from being released and water from being poured into the reactor. They are trying to find a way to open the valve
edit on 14-3-2011 by monica86 because: (no reason given)


can't relieve pressure, can't get coolant in? that's not good at all. not one bit.



posted on Mar, 14 2011 @ 02:51 PM
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reply to post by ethancoop
 


For perspective on that, doctors don't want to do CT scans unless it's absolutely necessary, especially the younger you are. It's considered a big dose of radiation that should only be done if medically indicated. It's much much more than a chest x-ray, and the x-rays they give you at the dentist nowadays are infinitesimal.

So, a CT scan per hour is actually a bad thing.



posted on Mar, 14 2011 @ 02:57 PM
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en.wikipedia.org...

Scroll down to Historical use and analysis:

Following the Chernobyl nuclear reactor disaster in April, 1986, a saturated solution of potassium iodide (SSKI) was administered to 10.5 million children and 7 million adults in Poland[22] as a prophylactic measure against accumulation of radioactive iodine-131 in the thyroid gland. People in the areas immediately surrounding Chernobyl itself, however, were not given the supplement.[23]

With the passage of time, people living in irradiated areas where KI was not available have developed thyroid cancer at epidemic levels, which is why the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) reported “The data clearly demonstrate the risks of thyroid radiation...KI can be used [to] provide safe and effective protection against thyroid cancer caused by irradiation.[26]

Looks like Potassium Iodide might help us West Coasters from developing cancer should the radiation cloud hit us.



posted on Mar, 14 2011 @ 03:00 PM
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reply to post by antar
 


Yes, I agree. I think everyone is taking this seriously, except the mainstream media.

 


This just posted to the web today.

Thyroid cancer a hazard from radioactive iodine emitted by Japan’s failing nuclear power plants


One of the most abundant substances in the cloud of radioactive steam released by a failing nuclear power plant is iodine-131—a radioactive form of the element, iodine, that is found throughout nature. Iodine-131 poses a special health risk because of its cancer-causing effect on the thyroid gland.


Ha rvard Med Publications



posted on Mar, 14 2011 @ 03:02 PM
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Here is a new news posted a few minutes ago, totally heartwrenching and a few new photos that until now i have not seen....

the one of the girl looking out at the dog from inside, there cant be a god, this seals it for me!

www.dailymail.co.uk...



posted on Mar, 14 2011 @ 03:05 PM
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Info that I posted before with links was that zirconium, which is the material the fuel rod cladding is composed of, melts at a higher temperature than the uranium fuel inside.

the zirconium melts at approximately 3000 degrees Fahrenheit, not Centigrade.



The fuel rods (uranium anyway) melt at 1132 degrees C.Source The zirconium cladding over the fuel melts at 1852 degrees C.Source



posted on Mar, 14 2011 @ 03:06 PM
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reply to post by Topato
 


I believe the best thing for all North Americans to do would be to start eating a kelp-rich diet immediately, or taking kelp supplements. This will not have the bad effects of the iodide pills, will be more readily available to most people (tons of kelp on the market) and can be taken without wearing a tinfoil hat. It takes longer to absorb, but if you start eating it now, chances are you'll be full of iodide by the time anything significant hits us. It would be a great precaution with very little side effects (except the few people who don't know they're allergic to kelp or whatnot) and result in better health for all, regardless.

ETA: my husband and I started taking kelp supplements Sunday. I'm going out to buy a bunch of organic powdered milk in case the food chain becomes contaminated. Good to have the milk in case of hurricanes (live on the east coast) so it's not a waste. Everyone should start looking at their disaster preparedness, because beyond Japan and fallout, we could all find ourselves in the same situation at the drop of a hat. Natural disasters are everywhere. Make sure you will be self-sufficient for a few weeks and not starving and thirsty like some in Japan are now becoming.
edit on 14-3-2011 by 00nunya00 because: (no reason given)




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