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Japan declares 'nuclear emergency' after quake

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posted on Apr, 13 2011 @ 11:19 PM
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reply to post by zorgon
 



Originally posted by zorgon

Originally posted by okiecowboy
I wonder what this is on the outside of the building ?? looks about the same temp doesn't it?


The radioactive water in the pits?


Isn't that the location of the Fubarium? (Black arrow with question mark) - I think that's what it is.
edit on 13-4-2011 by OuttaHere because: just... because.




posted on Apr, 13 2011 @ 11:20 PM
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Originally posted by zorgon

Originally posted by okiecowboy
I wonder what this is on the outside of the building ?? looks about the same temp doesn't it?


The radioactive water in the pits?


when you orthorectify it is directly under and behind or possibly in the wall , most likely poolium the round-ish nature of the spot on top (which is the same spot) is likely still intact rods undergoing criticality, the side view is the melt
edit on 13-4-2011 by Silverlok because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 13 2011 @ 11:21 PM
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reply to post by OuttaHere
 


fubarium is at the little number 4 your (the black?)arrow requires a new name the red one is a hot spot that is still under analysis
edit on 13-4-2011 by Silverlok because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 13 2011 @ 11:26 PM
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OK I fail it was posted on March 14... Sorry about that.
edit on 13-4-2011 by Vitchilo because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 13 2011 @ 11:27 PM
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Originally posted by JustMike
reply to post by zorgon
 

Those stinkin' barges...


Yep, we're not getting a lot of info about them.

All I can offer to this discussion are some barge images from TEPCO's webcam shots. Well, the links to them, anyway. I wrote up most of the following post on Monday (but didn't post it), and then revised it today to include the latest images. As we're not getting much new from TEPCO on anything right now I figured it might be a good time to post this:


Probable arrival of a Barge in 9 a.m. image on April 2nd

I recall TEPCO stating a barge docked at about 9.10 am on this date. In fact I think someone posted the precise TEPCO statement (to that effect) in the thread. This image shows what appears to be a barge in the extreme right of the frame (mid foreground) entering through the breakwater. The object is not in either the preceding or following images on that day, which would tend to suggest that it was probably on its way in to dock as TEPCO announced.


Barge with crane in 9 a.m. image on April 11th
Hard to discern the barge at first glance in the above image, but after seeing the next one then re-checking this one, you will be able to identify it okay.


Barge with crane in 10 a.m. image on April 11th
Much clearer here. Makes you wonder what they're up to, doesn't it?

New ones from today (April 13th):


Barge with crane in 9 a.m. image on April 13th[/url]
Quite visible this time. Repairing something? Moving something?

[ats]http://pointscope01.jp/data/f1np/f1np1/pic/20110413100040.jpg[ats]
Barge with crane in 10 a.m. image on April 13th
Still there...


Barge with crane in 11 a.m. image on April 13th
Yep. Still there. Hmmm...

I have no idea what this barge with the crane is doing. Certainly in the latter ones (today), it doesn't seem likely it was sailing off anywhere, unless they needed some hours to prepare it for sea. I'm not even sure it would be very navigable with that crane boom sticking up like that. (Yes I suppose they could lower it.) But whatever... I'll leave that to the experts on matters maritime.

If anyone has the time and wouldn't mind uploading all these images for our members' and many lurkers' viewing pleasure then I'd appreciate it. I'd normally do it myself but I'm not feeling too good tonight and need some shut-eye.

Best regards,

Mike


Done
just added a few codes and left your text


So.... the barges were NOT for water... they WERE brought in to load stuff like we saw in the night photo with the white sheets. And that had US participation and a warship...

Your right VERY suspicious activity and no news reports about a crane on a barge


edit on 13-4-2011 by zorgon because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 13 2011 @ 11:27 PM
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Originally posted by Destinyone

Originally posted by Fractured.Facade
reply to post by Destinyone
 


10 Bar = 145.038 PSI.

Given the massive size of these vessels, that is a hell of a lot of pressure. Especially if it is water pressure.




Found this graph on the same site, and another one listed below first one. Maybe you can make heads or tails of them.



And numbers chart.



Des


That first chart seems to confirm the extreme pressure, it is charted in Mpa ... 1 Mpa = 10 Bar: 10 Bar = 145.038 PSI.

You can see the rise, and the dates below, when readings are taken I suppose... as for the rest, I can't read Japanese.




posted on Apr, 13 2011 @ 11:31 PM
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Originally posted by Fractured.Facade

Originally posted by Silverlok

Originally posted by okiecowboy
reply to post by Fractured.Facade
 





10 Bar = 145.038 PSI. Given the massive size of these vessels, that is a hell of a lot of pressure. Especially if it is water pressure.


looking for my specs now...but I think the danger area is at 7 bars......(don't hold me to that yet)


reactor design is 4 bar the threshold for error is almost zero


If that is the case then they need to either vent that pressure off somehow, or run like hell, it's going to blow!

Something that big with that kind of pressure, if it ruptures it will be like a massive bomb.

Look what happens when the fuselage, or cabin of a pressurized aircraft ruptures with only millibars of pressure inside.

Vent, or evacuate... seems like their only options.




possibly but i see a weird almost desperate data release

they might be driving the environment artificially high to entice response...or it has been this bad all along and tyhey have been hiding the info , but my question is why weeks of nothiing and then NOW suddenly every moment a disaster... let's face it explosion(because of local and international public perception ) is the last thing these guys want if they get that desperate then it's time for bunker bombs , although with a level seven maybe Tepco now figures that's the most effective way if the media inspires them not not have to pay for it, and if you are still on mrbill stew some potatoes in that



posted on Apr, 13 2011 @ 11:33 PM
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Originally posted by Fractured.Facade

Originally posted by Destinyone

Originally posted by Fractured.Facade
reply to post by Destinyone
 


10 Bar = 145.038 PSI.

Given the massive size of these vessels, that is a hell of a lot of pressure. Especially if it is water pressure.




Found this graph on the same site, and another one listed below first one. Maybe you can make heads or tails of them.



And numbers chart.



Des


That first chart seems to confirm the extreme pressure, it is charted in Mpa ... 1 Mpa = 10 Bar: 10 Bar = 145.038 PSI.

You can see the rise, and the dates below, when readings are taken I suppose... as for the rest, I can't read Japanese.



Hey TEPCO...yeah YOU...how do you feel watching us read your insider charts huh? We know you are in deep poop,
No matter how hard you try to keep the truth from your people, there WILL be someone who works for you, who will at some point, decide that they prefer to be human, instead of a corporate tow the line lackey. We are waiting to welcome that HERO with open arms. It will happen TEPCO...mark my words.

Des



posted on Apr, 13 2011 @ 11:36 PM
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Has there been any news surrounding reactor 5? I see the water level is dropping.




posted on Apr, 13 2011 @ 11:36 PM
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reply to post by Silverlok
 





they might be driving the environment artificially high to entice response...or it has been this bad all along and tyhey have been hiding the info , but my question is why weeks of nothiing and then NOW suddenly every moment a disaster... let's face it explosion(because of local and international public perception ) is the last thing these guys want if they get that desperate then it's time for bunker bombs , although with a level seven maybe Tepco now figures that's the most effective way if the media inspires them not not have to pay for it, and if you are still on mrbill stew some potatoes in that



simple..the barges have done the work needed...



posted on Apr, 13 2011 @ 11:36 PM
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Originally posted by Destinyone
reply to post by okiecowboy
 

My guess, dried salt residue from all that salt water dumped and sprayed everywhere....


or Boron that was in the water to stop fission



posted on Apr, 13 2011 @ 11:46 PM
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Originally posted by KaiserSoze
I bet they would even be willing to throw in a lifetime supply of sake.


Hmmm what's that about a dozen bottles?




posted on Apr, 13 2011 @ 11:46 PM
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reply to post by mrbillshow
 


Uncalled for and harsh assessment.
D you expect everyone to make you happy with robotic and emotionless reporting of straight facts and data?

It's a tough and emotional subject that posters have been spending a great deal of time immersed in researching, reporting and reading AND there has been a great deal more self control than lack thereof in posting emotional rants, commentary and far out speculations.

Much gratitude to all involved for their dedication to gathering an presenting this information and being human



edit on 4/13/1111 by NoAngel2u because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 13 2011 @ 11:48 PM
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In Japan, Earthquakes also felt from within


www.nytimes.com...



posted on Apr, 13 2011 @ 11:54 PM
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reply to post by JackBauer
 

It would seem that if the water is not "changed " or diluted on a regular basis (one of the reasons they have a fluid decontamination plant on-site) it begins to , with a predictable decay pattern, lose it's cooling abilities. Areva ( shaky ) gave them 5-6 weeks before the pools at five and six start kicking

edit on 13-4-2011 by Silverlok because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 13 2011 @ 11:58 PM
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Originally posted by crazydaisy
In Japan, Earthquakes also felt from within


www.nytimes.com...


Hmmm, some interesting stuff in that story...


Hidehiko Nishiyama, the deputy director general of Japan’s nuclear regulator, the Nuclear and Industrial Safety Agency, said at a news conference on Wednesday evening that three measures are being considered that would allow electricity and cooling at the plant to remain intact even after a tsunami measuring 15 meters, or 49 feet.


They expecting something big? Or does he mean this...


A second measure is to put a generator on a small hill inside the plant site, and the third is to place a fire pumper engine on the hill that could send water into the reactors and spent fuel pools even if electricity was interrupted.


Which is probably what they should have done in the first place when they built the darn thing



posted on Apr, 14 2011 @ 12:01 AM
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Originally posted by Fractured.Facade

Originally posted by Destinyone

Originally posted by Fractured.Facade
reply to post by Destinyone
 


10 Bar = 145.038 PSI.

Given the massive size of these vessels, that is a hell of a lot of pressure. Especially if it is water pressure.




Found this graph on the same site, and another one listed below first one. Maybe you can make heads or tails of them.



And numbers chart.



Des


That first chart seems to confirm the extreme pressure, it is charted in Mpa ... 1 Mpa = 10 Bar: 10 Bar = 145.038 PSI.

You can see the rise, and the dates below, when readings are taken I suppose... as for the rest, I can't read Japanese.



Those pages are on a secure sever that someone forgot to add the htaccess password protocol...
Oopps, gave it way if they're reading this...



posted on Apr, 14 2011 @ 12:02 AM
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In regards to our Redneck missing in action, I believe I recall he mentioned having a big project on hand organizing his workshop. Perhaps he's up to his redneck in a mess.



posted on Apr, 14 2011 @ 12:02 AM
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I found these interesting


Reactor rods, may not be identical to what is in the reactors but would at least be similar.





Fuel assembly




Image from NHK supposedly of Fukushima or a similar Mark 1 reactor SFP. It is a bit hard to see in the image but the rod assemblies seem to have a rusty colored oxidation on them.







source



posted on Apr, 14 2011 @ 12:08 AM
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reply to post by okiecowboy
 


cladding went first as these were mostly air reactions with rods , so that grey powder is probably them (they get brittle when heated, remember arnie hinted about powdering), but even if not rod a couple of inches in diameter and 10 to 12 feet long rarely survive catastrophic ejection, but the grey powder gives off a weird light




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