Japan declares 'nuclear emergency' after quake

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posted on Mar, 11 2011 @ 07:56 PM
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Originally posted by EnhancedInterrogator

Originally posted by jude11
Homer?...Is that you?


Now, how did I miss that one?!


Gotta have a Homer mindset I guess...LOL




posted on Mar, 11 2011 @ 07:58 PM
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reply to post by jude11
 


So quick question Idk if yall will be able to answer it or not but...If one of the Daini reactors melts down is it just imminent doom that all the other reactors at the site are going to meltdown too, same with the other site? As in a chain reaction, from my understanding of the redneck's post it's just melts everything so I feel like all reactors would be affected by the heat of one melting down.



posted on Mar, 11 2011 @ 08:03 PM
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reply to post by Kennypowers
 

Not an expert on this by any means, but I would guess that would not be the case. However, if one reactor goes, I'm not sure if that means they have to completely evacuate the plant. If so, I'm (again) not sure if that means having any of the other reactors at the same plant be effectively "unmonitored" or "unmanaged" (assuming it can't be 100% done remotely), would add some risk to the other reactors' condition.



posted on Mar, 11 2011 @ 08:05 PM
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Originally posted by Kennypowers
reply to post by jude11
 


So quick question Idk if yall will be able to answer it or not but...If one of the Daini reactors melts down is it just imminent doom that all the other reactors at the site are going to meltdown too, same with the other site? As in a chain reaction, from my understanding of the redneck's post it's just melts everything so I feel like all reactors would be affected by the heat of one melting down.


Sorry, unable to answer as the info is still sparse. No idea whether they are connected, distance to each etc. We have to wait for Homer to weigh in as he seems to be more knowledgeable.

And for a little levity: I can't believe we are relying on Homer to save the World! LOL!

(joking of course Mr. RedNeck)



posted on Mar, 11 2011 @ 08:15 PM
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Tepco's English Web-Site seems to have gone dark now.
My guess is that it's just getting overloaded by too many people hitting it, as this news get's around.



posted on Mar, 11 2011 @ 08:32 PM
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Thanks to all of you for the updates. I have been watching this scenario unfold since 5 am this morning Eastern Standard Time.

I watched the news tonight after work, and it's not near the info I am receiving on here. Thank goodness for collaboration on this site.

Lots of hard workers here...finding out what we need to know. We can't trust our normal media to inform, never have, or at least I haven't.

It takes lots of digging and that is evident here.

Thank you to all the folks who are willing to spend their time to inform us. Bless you!

Very happy to be a part of the ATS community!



posted on Mar, 11 2011 @ 08:32 PM
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Godzilla is going to appear.



posted on Mar, 11 2011 @ 08:34 PM
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reply to post by TheRedneck
 


My dad built diesel engines for 50 freaking years, and my uncle for just about as long. I know how big they are. They have shipped out everything you could dream of. From ganged (two or more end to end) engines used on navel ships, to generation trailers that look like normal box trailers, to the engines that are used in semi trucks. 100foot total length isn’t that big. You can easily replicate the capacity with ganged portable diesels, or with portable gas turbine units.

www.reidcrowther.co.uk...

multipart.itrademarket.com...

3MW or 5MW (and beyond) gas turbine, anywhere you want, all you have to do is call. I know the military has portable units that big.

And in regard to the reactors.

These are BWR (boiling water reactors.)
They are designed to generate steam in the core during normal operation.
The reaction is partially moderated by the percent of cavitation (steam bubbles) in the water in the core. All modern nuclear power plants have a “non electrical” automatic system of rod insertion. If power is lost, all rods drive home. I can point to document after document if you wish to argue the case.

And the batteries are there to hold the system over until the generators can be started.
The generators are sized to allow full cooling system operation, and control room operation if you loose outside power. You don’t need full generator capacity to run basic cooling.

None of this stuff steps out of normal day to day engineering capability that is available all across the world.
As I stated before, it’s not rocket science dudes.



posted on Mar, 11 2011 @ 08:36 PM
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Originally posted by SkunkSense
Thanks to all of you for the updates. I have been watching this scenario unfold since 5 am this morning Eastern Standard Time.

I watched the news tonight after work, and it's not near the info I am receiving on here. Thank goodness for collaboration on this site.

Lots of hard workers here...finding out what we need to know. We can't trust our normal media to inform, never have, or at least I haven't.

It takes lots of digging and that is evident here.

Thank you to all the folks who are willing to spend their time to inform us. Bless you!

Very happy to be a part of the ATS community!


Actually, It's all just me on here. I have a lot of aliases. LOL



posted on Mar, 11 2011 @ 08:38 PM
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reply to post by Kennypowers

Not necessarily; all reactors are self-contained and independent of each other. When a plant is first constructed, one reactor can be started at a time. It is housed in its own building all alone, with its own primary and secondary cooling loops, and even its own cooling tower. All the control and monitoring systems are dedicated as well. A two-reactor plant is essentially two separate power plants connected by a few feet of concrete and steel wall.

Of course, if one melts down, the other will definitely be inoperative, but as long as it is shutdown it won't add to any problems.

Homer... er, I mean TheRedneck



posted on Mar, 11 2011 @ 08:39 PM
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The tepco site is back up.. Obviously, they don't know what is going on there.


6:08PM, we announced the increase in reactor containment vessel pressure, assumed to be due to leakage of reactor coolant. However, we do not believe there is leakage of reactor coolant in the containment vessel at this moment


Lets hope they are monitoring groundwater.. Those rods had better be intact



posted on Mar, 11 2011 @ 08:40 PM
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reply to post by jude11
 


I have worked at Fukushima and work at sites in the US as well. The units are in separate buildings each with its' own safety systems, so one meltdown will not cause another to do the same. I can say at this point, without more info, that although things are bad they can still be turned around and there is a decent amount of time to do so. As far as the buses mentioned at the site that is normal. They are used to transport workers too and from the different reactors. At this point all non essential workers have been evacuated and the people that are in the plant are highly skilled and in Japan are some of the best I have seen.

I have been reading ATS for a month or so now mostly for laughs but I feel I can be of use to this topic considering I am in the nuclear power trade
edit on 11-3-2011 by nuclearinfo because: background info



posted on Mar, 11 2011 @ 08:42 PM
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Originally posted by TheRedneck
reply to post by Kennypowers

Not necessarily; all reactors are self-contained and independent of each other. When a plant is first constructed, one reactor can be started at a time. It is housed in its own building all alone, with its own primary and secondary cooling loops, and even its own cooling tower. All the control and monitoring systems are dedicated as well. A two-reactor plant is essentially two separate power plants connected by a few feet of concrete and steel wall.

Of course, if one melts down, the other will definitely be inoperative, but as long as it is shutdown it won't add to any problems.

Homer... er, I mean TheRedneck



Nope, Sorry....It's Homer now! (All in fun guy)



posted on Mar, 11 2011 @ 08:49 PM
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Guess what, TEPCO are a bunch of cutting corners slackers and are implicated in lots of scandals for being such.

Their history of cutting corners



posted on Mar, 11 2011 @ 08:56 PM
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reply to post by nuclearinfo

Does Japan have the equivalent of the US NRC? I assume they do, but not really sure.

TheRedneck



posted on Mar, 11 2011 @ 08:58 PM
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reply to post by Vitchilo


That looks more like a program on how to change that past. Granted it means things have happened to need a program. I would rather a company admit its mistakes and explain what they are doing to change rather than try to hide them.



posted on Mar, 11 2011 @ 09:02 PM
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Loss of cooling is a problem because that will cause the operators to have to poison the reactor,
commercial pressurized water reactors like those in japan can be poisoned if the cooling water system fails.

In the PWR, these neutron absorbing solutions are stored in pressurized tanks (called accumulators) ready to be injected into the reactor in case of a cooling water failure or control rod failure.

A Scram(safety control rod axe man) using reactor poisons will cause long term problems restarting the reactor as they must be removed.
en.wikipedia.org...

It takes a lot of time to cool a reactor by this method if the cooling water system has failed and some gasses may be created that may need to be vented.

In japan they likely are waiting if they can for a offshore wind to do the venting so that there is no radiation over land. In this case its not radioactive particles but gasses and steam that will disperse quickly.

The biggest problem will be that it can take months to restart these reactors.
Japan gets about 30 percent of its electricity from nuclear power. And the loss of power form these plants will hurt japan as factories will have to shut down because of lack of power. until they can be brought back on line.



posted on Mar, 11 2011 @ 09:04 PM
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Originally posted by EnhancedInterrogator
reply to post by Hessling
 


Yeah, you've heard about "The Chewbacca Defense"?

This is the "Ruby Slipper's Method" of information disclosure. Just say the way you want to be true!
edit on 2011-3-11 by EnhancedInterrogator because: fmatten, and spling.


EnhancedInterrogator,

Nope never heard the technical term "Chewbacca Defense", though I remember watching that South Park episode. Yeah, I think you are onto something there.

Looking forward to the Wikipedia entry "Ruby Slipper's Method". You deserve credit for it.

Cheers!



posted on Mar, 11 2011 @ 09:06 PM
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reply to post by TheRedneck
 


They do, The Nuclear and Industrial Safety Agency, NISA and actually are far stricter than our NRC. The plants in Japan are immaculate as far as cleanliness, exposure to radioactivity for workers, and maintenance. I forget the percentage but a majority of Japans power is nuclear.



posted on Mar, 11 2011 @ 09:08 PM
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So what are the chances of radioactive clouds being carried to North America???





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