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Japan declares 'nuclear emergency' after quake

page: 685.htm
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posted on Apr, 12 2011 @ 08:55 PM
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I remember seeing a post (I believe with a link) that said the IAEA wanted to call it a 6 immediately. The NISA is the one who pushed for the 5. Does anyone have any sort of confirmation to this? Its been a month since the disaster, but how long since the IAEA said it should be higher than 5?

3/12 NISA Level 4
3/18 NISA Level 5 (Daiichi 1/2/3 are 5s, Unit 4 is 3)
4/12 NISA Level 7

edit on 12-4-2011 by KnowledgeIsPowre because: (no reason given)




posted on Apr, 12 2011 @ 09:10 PM
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reply to post by JustMike

Originally posted by JustMike
reply to post by SFA437
 

Nice...

We could also use "FUBARIUM"...

As an aside, I hope that the TEPCO-employed and Japanese government-employed watchers of this thread appreciate what we are really doing with this little game of words.

We are trying to tell you that we are absolutely furious and disgusted with your respective leaders' lack of concern for your fellow citizens. At the very least, people within the higher-radiation areas should be evacuated at government and TEPCO expense as soon as possible, by buses or vehicles driven by suitably-protected drivers. They should be removed to places that are safer.

If necessary, the government has the power to take control of various state-run buildings that could be used for accommodation so that these people can be housed with some degree of dignity.

It is not good enough to say that these people should evacuate "within a month". That is too long and your leaders know it.

It is not good enough to say that these people are "on their own" and will get no government support to help them leave their homes and land. No, their currently elected government should do what it is sworn to do and offer support and resources to its people in their time of need.

Your people's lives and even those of your women's unborn children are being threatened, and your government of today does not offer them all possible help with all possible speed?

Do you know how we in other countries see this inaction by your leaders?

We see it as many things and they are all bad. But one thing that is very, very bad is that we see weakness. Strong leaders take action and place themselves after their people. Weak leaders wait and care only for their own selves and ignore the greatest threats.

It is a leader's duty to lead and to act swiftly to protect the people!


(Moderators: if this is considered off-topic then please do whatever you feel necessary. But I had to say this openly.)
 


Everything you say is true. 100%. But lets keep in mind we cannot take the moral high ground. In the West we have an abysmal record for looking after our own people. Different inactions maybe but the same result. A section of the population who should be treated equally with the rest are instead treated as disposable when disaster strikes. Look at what happened in New Orleans following Katrina. Look at what has (not) happened to isolated rural communities in Queensland following the floods. Look at the ghetto-ization into three zones, an apparent hierarchy of deservedness in Christchurch since the last major earthquake event.

Governments in the West following these major disasters have treated corporations with the kind of prioritisation the population deserve first and foremost. Look at the what happened during the oil clean up in the Gulf. Mercenaries hired by the oil company to close off the entire area of land sky and sea. And the US government sanctioned it all. The oil still remains and the so do the oil companies even if they do have to wait a polite distance of time before resuming full operations.

Japan and the West and every industrialised nation is now running according to the same order of priorities. It seems to me it was Japan that got really unlucky this time around. We should expect no different from governments in our own countries when this kind of disaster strikes. There is no reason to think they would react much differently at all. No buses for the handicapped and elderly in Fukushima, no buses for the poor and black in New Orleans. The priorities of government now lie in the claws of the giant corporations. Let's not forget that. The same reasons lie behind the media blackout on what is really taking place at Fukushima and the appalling choices by the government in Japan. Profit is being put before people. Corporations and government in complete lockstep. One step away from fascism.


edit on 12-4-2011 by Tallone because: Some speeeeling mistakeees.



posted on Apr, 12 2011 @ 09:23 PM
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reply to post by Silverlok
 


Got ya.

Hopefully their visit to Japan was in time to enjoy a nice helping of plutonium with a little cesium side salad.



posted on Apr, 12 2011 @ 09:30 PM
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Originally posted by zorgon

Originally posted by Silverlok
I think that since ATS has done much work on the subject someone here should get to name that poolium falls thing(visible in the upper left hand corner at about 1:21...any suggestions?





I was thinking about that .... "Fuzium" a few days ago. Here are some "blow-up" (forgive the pun) of the pics on different days. Check out the last one from TEPCO. The "fuzium" is a goldish color.






Source ... cryptome



posted on Apr, 12 2011 @ 09:40 PM
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Been gone a while, and I don't think I will be back until the weekend. By then this thread will probably be up to 10,000 or so replies, so I might not read each one. Had some nice long discussions with my H.S. classes about what was going on at that plant yesterday and today, and now the recent NY times article on working conditions at that plant will be mandatory reading tomorrow and Thursday.

To be honest, I had been hoping against hope that I was sucked into a web of conspiracy alarmists, and the problems at that plant were not as bad as what I feared, but the 5:30 news basically confirmed what I feared when TEPCO made their statement

As if you all need a translation;

Amount of radiation released may eventually equal Chernobyl = Amount of radiation released will equal or exceed Chernobyl.

M



posted on Apr, 12 2011 @ 09:55 PM
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Originally posted by IDBIT

Here is some positive news: -

"Japan says nuclear crisis stabilizing, time to rebuild"


www.reuters.com...


And nearby flying monkeys were observed...........





For a change this is a true statement. The corium is in the bedrock where it is happily melting down to who knows where. They have "managed" the meltdowns so that what we will have is a "slow release" scenario instead of a large explosion. From what I understand from Redneck it is unlikely at this point we will get a big boom. This will go on this way for months if not years. So yes, it is "stable". JapGov/TEPCO shareholders spared, surrounding popluation not.



posted on Apr, 12 2011 @ 09:57 PM
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reply to post by JustMike
 


You get my vote.

"FUBARIUM"

Sums up the situation perfectly and keeps the "ium" to sound technical, good job!!



posted on Apr, 12 2011 @ 10:10 PM
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reply to post by KaiserSoze
 


There's always Failium


I guess the mods are not seeing the point of this little exercise in frustration my apologies

corium recovery basic info pdf


edit on 4/12/2011 by iforget because: (no reason given)

edit on 4/12/2011 by iforget because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 12 2011 @ 10:19 PM
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In Japan, a homecoming of desperation in the nuclear zone Residents of a town near the Fukushima nuclear plant venture back to their homes for the first time since they evacuated. They grab what belongings they can and dash off again, quite possibly never to return.

Article
Scary... I just pray for those who are not able to make it out.. gas ect..



posted on Apr, 12 2011 @ 10:19 PM
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Edano, you're a sick SOB. The whole ``let's eat contaminated food to keep the economy going`` routine uh?

You ate one strawberry... and that's probably all you'll ever eat again from Fukushima. But other people will eat tons and tons of those products and will end up with diseases because of this.

I hope you die in a painful way Edano, you deserve it.
edit on 12-4-2011 by Vitchilo because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 12 2011 @ 10:27 PM
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Hi.
I've been following this thread since page 1.

Just a query/observation considering the Corium making it's way- wherever that place may be...

It seems optimistic to me but, say that the sandstone under the plant; (is that the bedrock material in this case?) suppose the Corium somehow dissipates as it travels further toward the Earth's core and the sandstone then becomes absorbent/absolving the Corium and becoming glass-like?

I mean is it possible for sandstone to neutralize Corium? Personally, I don't really like the sounds of this stuff intermingling with/within the Earth's core.

Does it share the consistency as say Mercury? Is it just a big ball of volcano dung that really sticks to it self?
Thanks


edit on (4/12/1111 by loveguy because: more questions



posted on Apr, 12 2011 @ 10:35 PM
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It won't get to the earths core, it's basically dilution through what it melts/absorbs, like an amoeba, it won't get far.



posted on Apr, 12 2011 @ 10:37 PM
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Originally posted by MedievalGhost
Veggies grown 30 miles from Fukushima plant are safe? Oh really?


Sure it is
You can wolf down a half dozen of those berries and suffer 'no immediate risk to health" Bet he didn't take any home with him though



posted on Apr, 12 2011 @ 10:48 PM
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Originally posted by Wertwog
Sorry, I don't understand all these posts about tunnelling and drilling and such to get the corium OUT. To where? Where are you going to put this stuff that it isn't going to melt through and do the same thing in a different place. You can't handle it, it's too radioactive (it will kill in seconds, if not instantly), it will melt through all metals, it will mess up electronic circuitry. It will melt through rock. Pardon me, but what am I missing here?

There are a few tons of this stuff now happily burring down through the bedrock on it's way to however far it will go. Believe me, it's the best place for it, we don't want to be touching it. Best chance is to try to cool it where it is, hence all the radioactive water, but at this point likely only increase the radioactive steam exposures.

Haven't you heard the expression, "Hire teenagers while they still know everything."


The "bedrock" under the corium is shattered sandstone, below the water-level and infiltrated with seawater. You would not be able to make a chamber under it you could drill up from. You would end up with a thick, radioactive slurry of sand, water and salt.

The tiles on the space-shuttle are not capable of withstanding corium-type temperatures, and have to be inspected and many replaced between every trip because the temperatures they are exposed to age them quickly. Perhaps some people are confusing Fahrenheit and Celsius.
Shuttle Thermal Protection System (TPS).

It's not enough that the material forming the containment boxes has a melting temperature higher than the temperature of corium. Metals begin to deform at way below their melting point, and the neutron emissions of the corium would cause any metal to become brittle fast.

Sunken corium is not all runny like a molten, uniform metal. It is non-uniform, as in lumpy, and forms a crust around it, and this crust is incredibly tough. Despite being hard and tough it is still hot, in both senses of the word. It's unlikely there is any drill which could drill through it.

As H.L. Mencken said:
"For every complex problem, there is a solution that is simple, neat, and wrong."


There may be thing that can be done on site to lessen the dangers from the corium, but any effort to remove the corium after it has melted into the rock beneath the reactors will end in failure.



posted on Apr, 12 2011 @ 10:49 PM
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Originally posted by Wertwog
Sorry, I don't understand all these posts about tunneling and drilling and such to get the corium OUT. To where?


Give it to France... they claim they can reprocess all that stuff



posted on Apr, 12 2011 @ 10:52 PM
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Roving reporter trip to fukushima 1, "with the dogs and such"
www.youtube.com...
Roving reporter trip to fukushima 2, this is a good one because it's a) more recent and b) you get a some idea how bad this is getting and a comparison to chernoble's rads on the ground at the end + "those poor cows" I hate that ppl leave animals

www.youtube.com...
Here's a gd video of reac3, notice the white steam at the bottom, that's just one thing of many that were very different with this one."AKA Nothing to see here or CRAP"
www.youtube.com...
These pictures are getting old, but I'd like to hazzrd a guess that the "yellow buoy lookin' thing" atop reac4 is the cap to reactor 3 "as seen on Japan's unfunniest videos>above"
cryptome.org...
edit on 12-4-2011 by ALTERNATECH because: needed a consenant



posted on Apr, 12 2011 @ 10:56 PM
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reply to post by zorgon
 





Give it to France... they claim they can reprocess all that stuff


Tell em they can have it if they come and get it...



posted on Apr, 12 2011 @ 10:56 PM
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Originally posted by zorgon

Originally posted by MedievalGhost
Veggies grown 30 miles from Fukushima plant are safe? Oh really?


Sure it is
You can wolf down a half dozen of those berries and suffer 'no immediate risk to health" Bet he didn't take any home with him though


I'm wondering why anyone believes he ate anything from Fukushima.

Anyone doing a photo-shoot like this takes their props with them. Anything eaten on camera was probably grown in a filtered-water greenhouse or imported from New Zealand.

Besides, a ridiculous pantomime of clowns putting fruit to their mouths does not equal eating.



posted on Apr, 12 2011 @ 11:16 PM
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reply to post by ALTERNATECH
 


thanks for posting that...
you can't translate by chance can ya?



posted on Apr, 12 2011 @ 11:19 PM
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Originally posted by JustMike

As an aside, I hope that the TEPCO-employed and Japanese government-employed watchers of this thread appreciate what we are really doing with this little game of words.

We are trying to tell you that we are absolutely furious and disgusted with your respective leaders' lack of concern for your fellow citizens. At the very least, people within the higher-radiation areas should be evacuated at government and TEPCO expense as soon as possible, by buses or vehicles driven by suitably-protected drivers. They should be removed to places that are safer.

If necessary, the government has the power to take control of various state-run buildings that could be used for accommodation so that these people can be housed with some degree of dignity.

It is not good enough to say that these people should evacuate "within a month". That is too long and your leaders know it.

It is not good enough to say that these people are "on their own" and will get no government support to help them leave their homes and land. No, their currently elected government should do what it is sworn to do and offer support and resources to its people in their time of need.

Your people's lives and even those of your women's unborn children are being threatened, and your government of today does not offer them all possible help with all possible speed?

Do you know how we in other countries see this inaction by your leaders?

We see it as many things and they are all bad. But one thing that is very, very bad is that we see weakness. Strong leaders take action and place themselves after their people. Weak leaders wait and care only for their own selves and ignore the greatest threats.

It is a leader's duty to lead and to act swiftly to protect the people!


Good post. I'm shocked, disappointed and broken-hearted to hear how the residents around the reactors, who protested but had the MOX fuel forced on them anyway, are now deserted and betrayed and left to die horribly by those responsible for poisoning the land.

Japanese society is like American society. You take care of your own and dismiss others in trouble as losers who you are not accountable for. Townships in the affected areas have tried heroicly to take care of their own, but lack of edible food and water, lack of transport and lack of fuel for any remaining vehicles means they are unable to do so. I'll never forget the video of the Mayor of one of the affected towns begging outsiders to help. Japanese don't beg help from outsiders; it's against their strict code of honour. However this mayor found a higher level of honour, putting his individual honour aside in a desperate attempt to access help for those for whom he still held himself responsible.




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