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Japan declares 'nuclear emergency' after quake

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posted on Apr, 12 2011 @ 10:21 AM
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reply to post by Anmarie96
 


Good catch on the word "estimated." And I agree there is no way that any of the control rooms at Fukushima Daiichi look like that photo on the IAEA update page anymore. In retrospect, I'll bet that picture was included to subliminally make things seem less severe.




posted on Apr, 12 2011 @ 10:25 AM
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Originally posted by MedievalGhost
Today I am detecting slightly elevated levels of radiation on my geiger counter. Usually, I get readings of around .09 to .10 mSv/hr (normal background levels). But today I was detecting slightly higher readings- the highest of .14 to .15 mSv/hr. Located on the northern island of Hokkaido.

I will try to post a screen shot if I can.


What people need to monitor more than the rad levels are the wind directions, and forecasts... As long as there is a steady wind blowing east/southeast (offshore) rad levels in Tokyo and other areas will be lower, IF the winds change to west/southwest you are going to see a very sharp rise in rad levels.

This should help in preparation and plans, or when it is best to stay indoors... If you are out and about and there has been a significant change in wind direction, and it is blowing from the Fukushima area toward your area, then you may be wise to seek shelter and as much protection from exposure as you can find, until it passes.

Just a suggestion.



posted on Apr, 12 2011 @ 10:30 AM
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Originally posted by jjjtir
AFP - Japanese queue to buy produce from nuclear crisis area
Tue, Apr 12, 2011


news.asiaone.com/News/Latest%2BNews/Asia/Story/A1Story20110412-273274.html


TOKYO, JAPAN - Japanese shoppers on Tuesday snapped up fruit and vegetables farmed in the area hit by a nuclear disaster at a specially organised market, saying they wanted to show solidarity with the region.

(...)


Wow, that story more clearly illustrates cultural differences in the Japanese culture (at least for some) than anything I have ever read. That is exactly the opposite response of what you would get in the USA, I think.



posted on Apr, 12 2011 @ 10:33 AM
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reply to post by jadedANDcynical
 
Any mutations will show up at a greater frequency in tissue that is growing more quickly (more cell divisions/unit of time) , as in fetal tissue or the young of any species that are growing rapidly.

That is why they urge pregnant women and children not to consume food or drink suspected to be contaminated with radiation.



posted on Apr, 12 2011 @ 10:42 AM
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I'm going to re post these photos here, know someone wanted high resolution photos from the drone and haven't seen them. They ended up on the last post on the last page and I know some don't go back and reread past posts.

Photos



posted on Apr, 12 2011 @ 10:45 AM
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Add Strontium to the list of toxic isotopes now being discovered / admitted to.


(Reuters) - Slight amounts of strontium, a heavy radioactive metal that could lead to leukaemia, have been detected in soil and plants near the crippled Fukushima Daiichi nuclear plant, Japan's science and technology ministry said on Tuesday.


Source:

www.reuters.com...

Natural Strontium good. Radioactive Strontium BAD.


The human body absorbs strontium as if it were calcium. Due to the elements being sufficiently similar chemically, the stable forms of strontium might not pose a significant health threat—in fact, the levels found naturally may actually be beneficial (see below) -- but the radioactive 90Sr can lead to various bone disorders and diseases, including bone cancer. The strontium unit is used in measuring radioactivity from absorbed 90Sr.


Source - Wikipedia.

en.wikipedia.org...



posted on Apr, 12 2011 @ 10:54 AM
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I saw a couple of days ago on some thread a map that overlays the Chernobyl disaster area on top of Japan, I now can't find it (my search-fu is weak today)... hope someone can repost it.



posted on Apr, 12 2011 @ 11:14 AM
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This English version of a Japanese newspaper article provides some very interesting details of TEPCO's plans for decommissioning the Fukushima Daiichi reactors:

Source: The Mainichi Daily News


TEPCO won't take Chernobyl approach to resolving nuclear power plant crisis



It may take 10 years to start removing damaged nuclear fuel from the Fukushima No. 1 Nuclear Power Plant, but the plant's operator is adamant not to bury the damaged reactors while fuel remains in them, a company official has told the Mainichi.

"We will not bury the site while radioactive materials remain. We will definitely remove the fuel," Tokyo Electric Power Co. (TEPCO) adviser Toshiaki Enomoto told the Mainichi in an interview, stressing that the company would not bury the reactors in concrete in a "stone tomb" approach like the one adopted at Chernobyl.

TEPCO chairman Tsunehisa Katsumata has announced plans to decommission the plant's No. 1 through 4 reactors. Normally it takes 20 to 30 years to decommission a reactor, but the process at the Fukushima No. 1 Nuclear Power Plant is expected to take even longer as workers must start by developing specialized equipment to remove damaged fuel.

...


It's definitely worth reading the complete article here:

Source: The Mainichi Daily News - TEPCO won't take Chernobyl approach to resolving nuclear power plant crisis

It boggles my already boggled mind...



posted on Apr, 12 2011 @ 11:20 AM
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Originally posted by JustMike

Have I missed something? They have not stated they were using a sliding scale or anything like that. Their statement supports the idea that it's purely a simple arithmetic calculation. If it is, then they are wrong by a significant factor.


yes... you missed the fact that TEPCO uses a different system of math. That has been obvious from the first readings. You need to have the decoder ring to translate TEPCO math to real math. Probably need to add a factor of at least 10

Now Kan made a statement that people should support the stricken areas by eating the food and buying the products... and he also said...


He said that although the severity of the crisis at the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear plant has been raised to the highest level of 7, the situation is stabilizing and the amount of radioactive substances being emitted is slowly declining.

www3.nhk.or.jp...

So in other words the level has been raised to 7 but things are getting better.

See? You really need that decoder ring



posted on Apr, 12 2011 @ 11:23 AM
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Originally posted by Procharmo


Hmmm THAT fire doesn't look like the same location as this one, but it might be just angles



Thanks for getting that report... batteries catching fire... nothing to be concerned about... move along everything under control... no change in situation



posted on Apr, 12 2011 @ 11:27 AM
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Originally posted by ikonoklast
They seem to be carefully excluding soil contamination and sea water contamination when calculating the release as 10% of Chernobyl.

In other words, they are purposely comparing apples to oranges.


As I said... we need that decoder ring to understand their math



posted on Apr, 12 2011 @ 11:31 AM
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reply to post by ikonoklast
 





"We will not bury the site while radioactive materials remain. We will definitely remove the fuel," Tokyo Electric Power Co. (TEPCO) adviser Toshiaki Enomoto told the Mainichi in an interview, stressing that the company would not bury the reactors in concrete in a "stone tomb" approach like the one adopted at Chernobyl.


What the heck ? Why is it the companies decision at all ? This is concerning the whole country, and probably good parts of the planet, and the decision is at the guy who built that thing ??

Let's get an international team in there and cover that pile up A.S.A.P. With the tepco management shoveling on the frontline.



posted on Apr, 12 2011 @ 11:32 AM
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reply to post by ikonoklast
 


Just how are they supposed to remove melted fuel?


The melted fuel at Chernobyl was 15,000 times over the lethal dose and you cannot even approach such a mass without certain death as a result.

Intact rods, sure. Melted fuel, I don't think so.



posted on Apr, 12 2011 @ 11:40 AM
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reply to post by Kailassa
 


Whose fault is it?

Well - I'm going to go with the fault of people who put it on a FAULT LINE. That seems like FAULTY planning to me.



posted on Apr, 12 2011 @ 11:42 AM
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Originally posted by ikonoklast In retrospect, I'll bet that picture was included to subliminally make things seem less severe.


The command center is in a different building... They showed it a few days ago



However the picture you linked does not look like the right place














posted on Apr, 12 2011 @ 11:43 AM
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reply to post by jjjtir
 




AFP - Japanese queue to buy produce from nuclear crisis area Tue, Apr 12, 2011 news.asiaone.com/News/Latest%2BNews/Asia/Story/A1Story20110412-273274.html TOKYO, JAPAN - Japanese shoppers on Tuesday snapped up fruit and vegetables farmed in the area hit by a nuclear disaster at a specially organised market, saying they wanted to show solidarity with the region. The event was held to support the hard-hit farmers of an area of northeastern Japan devastated by the triple whammy of a massive earthquake followed by a tsunami and the biggest nuclear catastrophe since Chernobyl. Shoppers in the capital Tokyo lined up on the first day of the two-day market to buy fresh strawberries, asparagus, tomatoes and leeks from Iwaki - an area about 50 kilometres (30 miles) from the Fukushima Daiichi plant, which was devastated by the disaster. Fears over heightened radiation levels have triggered shipping bans on some produce from nearby Fukushima prefecture, home to the crippled nuclear plant, but organisers said tests had shown everything on sale was safe to consume. The government's chief spokesman Yukio Edano, who has sought to calm fears over radiation contamination, exclaimed "this is so sweet" as he ate a strawberry before the gathered media at the event. "This is food that people who are going through great pain devoted all of their energy to produce," Edano said. "Only safe produce is being distributed. Please eat it," he added, saying the government planned to organise other events to promote produce from the disaster zone. (...)



NOTHING surprises me anymore. The Russian's promoted the May day festivities after Chernobyl, resulting in the parade of death. Apparently, not to be outdone, the Japanese have decided to go with the buffet of death. Why would you, as a human being, promote a fraudulent sense of safety. Toting the company line is one thing, but actually promoting a false sense of security, which in the end will have unimaginable consequences, is inhuman.



posted on Apr, 12 2011 @ 11:43 AM
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reply to post by ikonoklast
 


They can't take the Chernobyl option. It isn't an option which is available.

It also doesn't work well with the neccessity to remove at the next possible opportunity that someone can get in there whatever super secret thing they where working on.
edit on 2011/4/12 by Aeons because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 12 2011 @ 11:46 AM
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reply to post by jjjtir
 


Nuclear power isn't the problem. Stupidity is the problem.



posted on Apr, 12 2011 @ 11:47 AM
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reply to post by FreeSpeaker
 


Agreed. The article seems to indicates they do not have a clue how they will remove the fuel and they seem to be hoping the will be able to develop new ways to do it... in about 10 years:


Enomoto said nuclear fuel at the plant could not be removed using conventional methods for two reasons: The reactor buildings are damaged, and measures are needed to prevent the spread of radiation; and 25 to 70 percent damage has occurred to the fuel rods in the No. 1, 2 and 3 reactors. New methods to remove the fuel must be developed, and it will take 10 years before workers can start removing fuel, he said.


Source: The Mainichi Daily News - TEPCO won't take Chernobyl approach to resolving nuclear power plant crisis

And they expect the entire process to take more than 30 years:


Normally it takes 20 to 30 years to decommission a reactor, but the process at the Fukushima No. 1 Nuclear Power Plant is expected to take even longer as workers must start by developing specialized equipment to remove damaged fuel.


Source: The Mainichi Daily News - TEPCO won't take Chernobyl approach to resolving nuclear power plant crisis

for TEPCO
edit on 12-4-2011 by ikonoklast because: Corrected spelling of news source.



posted on Apr, 12 2011 @ 11:49 AM
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Originally posted by ikonoklast
Wow, that story more clearly illustrates cultural differences in the Japanese culture (at least for some) than anything I have ever read. That is exactly the opposite response of what you would get in the USA, I think.


No... now go and drink your milk... it is safe


What you need to look at is WHAT they are eating. I don't see them eating fish, or spinach... I see them eating strawberries... and tomatoes... those two items did not show levels most likely because its not in the fruit, but the leaves.

In any case they really don't have a lot of choices. People need to eat something... there are a lot of people that will have no money if they can't sell, and people are suffering and dying from lack of food etc...

And as they say "no immediate risk to health"

We all know that the danger comes from LONG TERM consumption... no one will get sick or die from eating a few berries for photo ops

Now then, I think I will have some milk and make a few grilled cheese for breakfast



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