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Japan declares 'nuclear emergency' after quake

page: 646.htm
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posted on Apr, 10 2011 @ 12:58 PM
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reply to post by autopat51

Probably not melting... it is highly unlikely that an explosion would have thrown enough of them together to form a critical mass. More likely they are lying in tiny pieces (dust) scattered all over doing what plutonium/uranium/et al naturally do... decaying. And they will continue to decay for thousands upon thousands of years.

The crisis, it seems, may be over, but the effects will be around when everyone reading this has turned to dust, the pyramids have crumbled to nothing, and the planet may even be uninhabitable for other reasons. Fukushima is forever gone, and northern Japan is forever hazardous to one's health.

But TEPCO and the economy may be saved.


TheRedneck




posted on Apr, 10 2011 @ 12:58 PM
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Originally posted by XRaDiiX
reply to post by okiecowboy
 


The link is in my post....

Here right from the website



As expected, negligible levels of radioactivity have been detected along the North American west coast. The radiation levels found on the west coast are less than the natural levels of radiation that would be detected when it rains or snows.

Nonetheless, as a prudent measure and out of an abundance of caution to reaffirm the safety of this dietary staple for the majority of Canadians, samples of domestically produced milk from British Columbia were tested to verify that milk remains safe for consumption.


I'm sure they wouldn't release milk into public consumption if it was over the safety limit

edit on 10-4-2011 by XRaDiiX because: (no reason given)


No being funny but about 200 pages ago I and others posted that several governments and food agencies raised the current safe levels by a magnitude of 200.

So the answer to your question is yes but only after the safe level has been hiked! You can use Google for details!



posted on Apr, 10 2011 @ 01:01 PM
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reply to post by SFA437

On that point I cannot argue. I only submit that there is a limit below which a 'toxin' has negligible effects on overall health. At this time (and based on what I learned today about Fukushima), I believe any concentrations are well below that safety limit and likely to remain that way (except of course in Japan and perhaps neighboring countries).

TheRedneck



posted on Apr, 10 2011 @ 01:04 PM
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The most interesting point is that at Three Mile Island they also had that nasty water on the floor and it took them three years to remove it. But they admitted it was from the core meltdown and didn't dump it into the sea. Also TMI did not loose cooling systems.

Puts Fukushima at a whole new level as they have not been able to cool this mess for over a month now.

Okay I think I caught up today's news whew....

Now I can make some coffee and eat breakfast

edit on 10-4-2011 by zorgon because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 10 2011 @ 01:08 PM
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reply to post by zorgon
 


I'm not even going to ask how you get so many screen grabs without recording the NHK feed and screen printing. It is however greatly appreciated...



posted on Apr, 10 2011 @ 01:12 PM
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reply to post by Wertwog
 


Here you go the data is right on the site from the link i sent you www.hc-sc.gc.ca...

When they test the milk they will not allow it for public consumption if it is over the safety limit. If you're so worried about it wouldn't matter really because the miniscule amount of radiation would be getting in not just milk but several other foods as well. So either you're going to have to eat nothing then because every single natural food grown or raised as an animal will get some very small amount of radiation from this.

We'll just have to see how the amount of radiation accumulates over time then we can start to worry. But right now i wouldn't be too worried about it and yes. [SNIP]
en.wikipedia.org...


And yes i was correct you should be more worried about X-Ray Scanners airplane Flights etc much more exposure. Check the Data. [SNIP]


reply to post by Procharmo
 





No being funny but about 200 pages ago I and others posted that several governments and food agencies raised the current safe levels by a magnitude of 200. So the answer to your question is yes but only after the safe level has been hiked! You can use Google for details!


Can you link the Data for U.S and Canada Raising the Safety Levels?
edit on 10-4-2011 by XRaDiiX because: (no reason given)


Mod Note: ALL MEMBERS: We expect civility and decorum within all topics - Please Review This Link.


edit on 11/4/11 by argentus because: edited insult



posted on Apr, 10 2011 @ 01:12 PM
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reply to post by TheRedneck
 





I believe any concentrations are well below that safety limit and likely to remain that way (except of course in Japan and perhaps neighboring countries).


care to explain that a bit more to those of us that are a tad slow?
What Concentrations are you referring to ? just the iodide-131 or concentrations of U-238 and sr-90 and others?

so you don't feel bioaccumulation will be a factor outside japan?



posted on Apr, 10 2011 @ 01:13 PM
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reply to post by morefiber

I would say that at least in the US, training is improving every day. Nuclear science on a theoretical level is pretty established, but on a practical level we are learning more every day. Fukushima just showed us what actually happens during a China Syndrome meltdown, and as it turns out, it is less devastating globally than attempts to stop it.

Battery life is based on how long it is expected to take in an emergency situation to re-establish some sort of auxiliary power. So it depends on the proximity to generator sources, other plants, redundancy in re-establishing grid service, etc., etc., etc. And it is actually difficult to beat the old lead-acid deep-cycle battery design for raw power output, even with all the advances we have made in battery technology. I am working right now on a way to get my own home (and shop!) off the grid, and my solution includes a lead-acid deep-cycle battery bank for backup.

The real solution to making nuclear energy safe is an informed populous and public demand for safety. There will always be unscrupulous people in the world who will look for ways to maximize their profit at the expense of safety. That's why I never complained about the NRC being such a pit bull when I was working on my plant. We need those pit bulls to make life miserable for those trying to cut corners. And as long as the people demand it, they will be there. And hopefully, I have made a small contribution in this thread to educating some of the people.

It's when the people become apathetic that things go awry.

(Pisgah? That's right across the river from me! Small world...)

TheRedneck



posted on Apr, 10 2011 @ 01:16 PM
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Originally posted by XRaDiiX
reply to post by Wertwog
 


Here you go the data is right on the site from the link i sent you www.hc-sc.gc.ca...

When they test the milk they will not allow it for public consumption if it is over the safety limit. If you're so worried about it wouldn't matter really because the miniscule amount of radiation would be getting in not just milk but several other foods as well. So either you're going to have to eat nothing then because every single natural food grown or raised as an animal will get some very small amount of radiation from this.

We'll just have to see how the amount of radiation accumulates over time then we can start to worry. But right now i wouldn't be too worried about it and yes. You are fear monger
en.wikipedia.org...


And yes i was correct you should be more worried about X-Ray Scanners airplane Flights etc much more exposure. Check the Data. My good Fear monger
edit on 10-4-2011 by XRaDiiX because: (no reason given)


That is not the milk data. It is "average" data from external sampling. [SNIP] REPORTED.
edit on 10-4-2011 by Wertwog because: (no reason given)

edit on 11/4/11 by argentus because: removed insult



posted on Apr, 10 2011 @ 01:17 PM
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reply to post by zorgon

A Farmer OUTSIDE the 30Km area... his farm has high levels of cesium and he has been suspended from farming with no info on when or if he can start.

Perhaps in a few thousand years, his great-great-great-great-great-great-great-great-great-great-great-great-great-great-great-great-great-great-great-great-great-great-great-great-great- great-great-great-great-great-great-great-great-great-great-great-great-great-great-great-great-great-great-great-great-great-great-great-great-great- great-great-great-great-great-great-great-great-great-great-great-great-great-great-great-great-great-great-great-great-great-great-great-great-great- great-great-great-great-great-great-great-great-grandchildren can again farm that land... if they are lucky.

Sorry for all the 'greats', but it drives home the scale of devastation. How high the price for greed?


TheRedneck



posted on Apr, 10 2011 @ 01:18 PM
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reply to post by Wertwog
 


I'm just showing you the amount; Threshold they will allow if its any higher than that they will not release said Food/Drink Product to the public peace.


reply to post by TheRedneck
 


This is very sad news for the people of Japan Indeed!. Lets hope not alot of this Radiation Fallout happens in the Midwest Or West Coast we must hope they can stop a large contamination of our great plains in the U.S and Canada that would be devastating bad TEPCO.

Pray for those in Japan!

edit on 10-4-2011 by XRaDiiX because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 10 2011 @ 01:20 PM
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Originally posted by XRaDiiX
reply to post by okiecowboy
 


Well if you're not going to drink the milk you better not eat any meat either than but i will continue to eat it!


Suit Yourself but the levels are so miniscule for the time being there is not much to worry about unless you're very close to Japan
edit on 10-4-2011 by XRaDiiX because: (no reason given)


I fully expect to be admonished for this post...I accept the punishment I incur.

That being said, I hereby donate the first $10.00 to have you fixed....we certainly don't need you breeding.

Des



posted on Apr, 10 2011 @ 01:25 PM
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Originally posted by Wertwog

Originally posted by predator0187
reply to post by checkmeout
 


I know the majority of scientists believe that radiation is deadly, but the majority also believe aliens do not exist and the 9/11 OS, and yet lots preach about that here.

Pred...
edit on 10-4-2011 by predator0187 because: (no reason given)


Radiation IS deadly, no scientist worth their shells is going to dispute that. It's just a matter of what radiation, how much, and over how long, that is disputed.


Well it's all relative...

Back many years ago in Toronto some speed cops were using radar guns to catch those pesky speeders. Being a little lazy, they sat on their bikes and held the gun on their legs. Turns out they paid the price as the radar radiation that close to their privates made them sterile..

Now I call that poetic justice but the point is radiation has many more effects than death... and some of them may be worse than death

Warning not a pretty sight... and watch the helicopter at the start
www.liveleak.com...



posted on Apr, 10 2011 @ 01:26 PM
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reply to post by okiecowboy

Thus far, the only contamination I have seen reported in North America has been Cesium isotopes (Cs-134 and Cs-137) and I-131. No uranium or plutonium outside Japan.

These contaminants appear from the timing of their detection and from the events at Fukushima to have resulted from the #3 steam explosion. They were blown high enough for the Jet Stream to become a transport mechanism carrying them here. If there are no more steam explosions (or any explosions of that magnitude), there is no longer a transport mechanism capable of crossing the Pacific.

That means that what we have already is all we will have via airborne contamination.

The I-131 will fade rather quickly (actually already is in most areas) as it has a short (8 day) half-life. The cesium will last longer, but it is in even less concentration than the I-131 and does not accumulate in the human body.

Note that all this is based on North America... Japan is a completely different story. There is no need for a transport mechanism, since they are at ground zero. It also does not include oceanic contamination which may well affect the west coast at some future time, but will be limited to the shore area.

TheRedneck



posted on Apr, 10 2011 @ 01:27 PM
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reply to post by TheRedneck
 

Redneck,
Thanks for the update. What is your opinion on Tokyo and the Tokyo metro area? Will the shifting spring winds spread severe radiation to Tokyo or in your opinion has that been averted by allowing the cores to meltdown into the bedrock.

A



posted on Apr, 10 2011 @ 01:28 PM
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Just a couple of things:


If the corium has melted its way into the bedrock, thus making itself a permanent and deadly part of the Japanese landscape, I think it behooves someone to address the issue of radiation contaminating the groundwater supply.

I realize that there is little risk of contamination, given the likely location of the corium pools; and the fact that, I'm sure, the Japanese governemnt's safety officials will be testing the nation's drinking water sources, to insure that there is no "immediate risk to human health"

But it might be re-assuring to the public to hear that multiple pools of melted radioactive material, likely to give off lethal levels of radiation for decades to come, and now buried, inextricibly, in the very foundation of Japan, poses no risk to the the island's precious water supply.


And secondly;


If the people of Japan rise up, successfully, against the nuclear power industry in their country; what alternative energy source(s) do they actually have to fall back on?

Japan has no coal, gas, or oil resources of its own. Do not nuclear power plants supply almost all of the electricy Japan depends upon?


Japan's industry and thus, its economy, depends on a reliable supply of vast amounts of electricity.

If the public forces the Nukes to go, "Japan Inc." will be as toasted as Fukushima.


In the face of this disaster, would the people of Japan Really be willing to "turn back the clock" to a Japan of, say 1930?


Would they be allowed to try?



posted on Apr, 10 2011 @ 01:31 PM
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reply to post by TheRedneck
 


If you run into any Rodens, Wheelers or Ices, they are likely kin of mine.

M



posted on Apr, 10 2011 @ 01:34 PM
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reply to post by TheRedneck
 





Thus far, the only contamination I have seen reported in North America has been Cesium isotopes (Cs-134 and Cs-137) and I-131. No uranium or plutonium outside Japan.


just wanted to provide you with this while i digest what all you have said

Uranium has been detected in CA, WA, HI and Guam
(trace amounts)

as well as Te-132 etc..just because we know where that comes from


EPA

thanks for the reply...may comment more in a bit after i think about it



posted on Apr, 10 2011 @ 01:36 PM
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I was wknderig if either Redneck or Silverlok (or anyone else that has some depth of kmowledge regardig nuclear fuel) could take a look at this report and see if it has any bearing on what may have heepnd at reactor 3.

We've established that there was likely 15 psi of overpressure, hanks go to SFA437 for his assessment based on his prior expertise. Along with the analysis provided by JustMike in conjunction with SFA437 that the energy output was roughly equivalent to a MOAB.

I don't think there's much of anything of either the spent fuel or the the portion that shot out of the reactor like a cannon when that thing went off. Our only slightly saving race here is that they haven't had as long with the MOX to generate that much spent fuel.



posted on Apr, 10 2011 @ 01:36 PM
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reply to post by Leo Strauss

I believe Tokyo will be subjected to elevated levels of radiation for the duration of this disaster (forever in our perception). I do not think it will be in the lethal range by any means, but it will probably lead to an increase in the amount of cancers there, potentially a drastic increase. Look for this to start within the next 10 years.

I see a major impact on Japan's economy as well due to this. I highly doubt tourism or imported work forces will be picking up any time soon. If there are any major manufacturing facilities in Tokyo metro (and I am sure there are plenty), they will probably eventually move south or overseas. Japan's exports will decline, their trade imbalance will grow, and they will slowly but surely be replaced by China, Taiwan, Indonesia, India, etc. as major producers of high technology.

Tokyo may survive, but at a huge cost.

TheRedneck




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