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Japan declares 'nuclear emergency' after quake

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posted on Apr, 7 2011 @ 11:22 AM
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reply to post by JustMike
 


Most likely an extremely large electrical substation going up big time. They have a blueish white light usually (depending on if the camera operator has white balanced properly), the blue component is mostly UV and very damaging for your eyes, so not good to look at sustained large arcs.



Compared to powerline pole pig transformers going up in a storm. Lower energy but similar effect.




and here www.youtube.com... a slower version of what I beleive happened in Tokyo



Regarding the Fukushima situation, I have a hunch the water off fukushima is absolutely thick with excess neutrons - this would be the main thing that could start causing criticality issues in 5 and 6 as well as other particles. They must not be pumping them with fresh water as they are saying or this wouldn't be a problem. Another lie!

Pumping nitrogen to prevent a hydrogen explosion when they next vent and having a large earthquake plus a plant evacuation really doesn't help. As far as I've read the reactors need to be manually vented.
Why aren't more 'questionable' reactors experiencing issues throughout the country in cold shutdown? I know Japan needs power but at what cost? 4 reactors plus worth of radioactive junk is enough already!

Also some food for thought, hopefully a little more 'comforting'. And yes I'm well aware that radiation on any level, especially internally, has the potential to cause harm, lets not overlook this. The Russians have for years dumped many nuclear reactors into the sea, with and without fuel rods and hundreds of tonnes of highly radioactive liquid and solid waste. That link is just a starter, research yourself to see the full extent - it's mind-boggling enough to just consider the amounts. The USA ain't saints either in this regard (nuke testing and space satellite reactors anyone?) as with other nations. So we've already had high radiation emissions into water previously up until now, just not as continuously high volume as this. I believe fukushima won't be as bad as it is made out to be by many (including myself intially) however it will definately have localised effects to the Japanese mainland and possibly cause some concern to palatability of some fish on a global scale, whom may breed or pass through the area or concentrated radioactivity patches. I'd also assume perhaps a slightly higher global cancer rate, horrifying enough but I don't think world ending.

edit on 7/4/11 by GhostR1der because: pic/vid comparison




posted on Apr, 7 2011 @ 11:23 AM
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Originally posted by Moonbeams771
Could it possibly be Earthquake Light?


An earthquake light is an unusual luminous aerial phenomenon that reportedly appears in the sky at or near areas of tectonic stress, seismic activity, or volcanic eruptions.



The lights are reported to appear while an earthquake is occurring, although there are reports of lights before or after earthquakes, such as reports concerning the 1975 Kalapana earthquake.[2] They are reported to have shapes similar to those of the auroras, with a white to bluish hue, but occasionally they have been reported having a wider color spectrum.


Wiki


Greetings:

Not a chance.

We have been accumulating a plethora of material, and this flash is nothing remotely similar to any of the other verified material.

Thank you for your time and consideration.

These challenges to life and sanity on this planet must be met with clear minds and sound hearts, so may your 2011 see you embracing its highest potential and onward through the fog!

In Peace & Light

tfw



posted on Apr, 7 2011 @ 11:25 AM
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reply to post by MedievalGhost
 


Where is the fireball (orange) as the coolant in the transformers ignite?

All I've seen so far is the blue/white flash. If a major substation went up there should be a 500 foot column of orange flame.



posted on Apr, 7 2011 @ 11:26 AM
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I noticed a flash BEFORE the large flash on the video. It shows just as the the image switches from the map to the camara. Also, there are smaller flashes just to the right of the large white/blue flash that appear at the same time. I also noticed the lights do go out a few seconds after. Looks electrical to me.



posted on Apr, 7 2011 @ 11:29 AM
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reply to post by Wizayne
 


ah, was just literally about to post about those flashes off to the right



posted on Apr, 7 2011 @ 11:32 AM
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Comparison- Power Plant Explosion :




posted on Apr, 7 2011 @ 11:32 AM
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They just showed it again, after the flashes stop most of the lights go off, maybe a substation or a regular power plant hopefully.



posted on Apr, 7 2011 @ 11:38 AM
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reply to post by SFA437
 


As you can see in the video I linked, there is not always a coolant explosion. Often the light is from arcing either between fallen lines or poles or other material, during this process the ground fault breaker is tripped and the current stops before this over temperature point is reached. The length of the sparking in the Japanese video would probably be not long enough to heat the oil coolant sufficiently. Not all transformers explode, I've watched videos of them arcing and stopping many many times for what it counts!
edit on 7/4/11 by GhostR1der because: spelling>_>



posted on Apr, 7 2011 @ 11:38 AM
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Originally posted by odd1out
This wasn't just ONE explosion...watch this video...it's a series of flashes (blue) than the large white fireball.


www.youtube.com...


TY for video. Yup, clearly shows 3 explosions. Still praying it's an electric substation. Also NHK reported the train station in Sendai is closed down due to " water pouring like rain from the ceiling ". I'm going to keep reading this thread, from the safety of under my rock.

Des
edit on 03/28/2011 by Destinyone because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 7 2011 @ 11:38 AM
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I don't know why I bother BUT neutrons have a half life of about 10 min. In 100 min there are none remaining. But neutrons are particles, elementary ones they can't be moved around in sea water or sucked up with a pump.

I don't know where people get these weird ideas ...



posted on Apr, 7 2011 @ 11:41 AM
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reply to post by Anubikan
 


It is the flashes from multiple different positions that makes me believe they had an absolutely tremendous spike. The transformers were popping followed by the substation or facility. If the problem originated at a facility, then that raises all sorts of other questions...

It's my best guess and all I have at this point.



posted on Apr, 7 2011 @ 11:42 AM
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reply to post by GhostR1der
 


Just saw that


I'm keeping everything I have two of crossed that it's just a substation going up



posted on Apr, 7 2011 @ 11:45 AM
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Originally posted by SFA437
reply to post by GhostR1der
 


Just saw that


I'm keeping everything I have two of crossed that it's just a substation going up


No I shouldn't...but I really really want to...no, I won't go there


Des



posted on Apr, 7 2011 @ 11:45 AM
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reply to post by SFA437
 


This is one of those times I hope we are definitely right. Not often that happens around here



posted on Apr, 7 2011 @ 11:46 AM
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I think they are overdue with the webcam update!

www.tepco.co.jp...



posted on Apr, 7 2011 @ 11:48 AM
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I've been frantically trying to match up skyline in Sendai with that video and I think I have the point of reference for the webcam. My eyeball fu places it at the Hotel Metropolitan Sendai.

Using google earth from that location in Sendai line up NNE (015ish) from that building and you'll be able to pick up the buildings in the video with what you see. Also, note the rail lines on the right side of the video image sync up with those in google earth.

Pretty positive this is our video origin. Still working the angles and finding the blast source.

Soul






edit on 7-4-2011 by Soulwarrior because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 7 2011 @ 11:48 AM
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Aparently Onagawa nuclear plant lies in the direction where the explosions occurred o.0 eeek

maps.google.com...,141.499722&spn=0.01,0.01&t=m&lci=org.wikipedia.en&q=38.401111,141.499722
edit on 7-4-2011 by Anubikan because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 7 2011 @ 11:49 AM
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reply to post by Procharmo
 


cheers for that


these bits kinda say a lot, but come as no big surprise...


Even prior to the Fukushima disaster, the SRS MOX project was in serious trouble. After AREVA made test fuel assemblies out of weapons grade plutonium sent to France from the United States under armed guard, Duke Energy tested the units in its Catawba nuclear power plant. Duke stopped the test in mid-cycle when the fuel was not behaving as expected in the reactor. Duke dropped out of the entire MOX partnership with NNSA after the test failure and gave up its ten percent interest in the project.




“This is a project sold by the Bush and Obama White House and received billions and should have never been approved,” a former high-level DOE official told DCBureua.org. “This was about keeping the nuclear weapons lines open by claiming old weapons could be converted into energy. The problem is we really don’t even know if it can be done and we have relied on the French because we think weapons grade will behave just like reactor grade reprocessed plutonium. After Fukushima it is clear we can’t even manage the reactor grade MOX.” The official declined to be quoted by name because he fears retribution from the powerful NNSA. “If you don’t follow their script, they can make certain you don’t work again. They control the contractors,” he said.



posted on Apr, 7 2011 @ 11:50 AM
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reply to post by SFA437
 


watching msnbc, they kept saying the power plant is okay and no new damage, then a guy came on and said they don't know because they can't get close, and it will be a while , and that the workers ran to a earthquake proof area there.



posted on Apr, 7 2011 @ 11:50 AM
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reply to post by SDoradus
 


Because neutrons make other radioactive atoms, and so their radiation doesn't just disappear, chances are it gets absorbed into an atom and the new configuration is not stable and can re-emit the radiation in just as energetic of a way quickly (strong burst) or slower (gradual or staged series of emission) or potentially in any combination depending on the substance.

When you say it's half-life is only 10 minutes, I am thinking this radiation to be more of a cascading reaction that will dilute itself into a nasty cocktail of thousands of different molecules and elementary isotopes. That radiation has to go somewhere and it does it get re-emitted (just because something is "stable" doesn't mean that it actually is "stable"; just "more stable than most". There are actually many more different isotopes of elementary atoms than we have discovered only in many conditions the half-life is so quick that when the isotope is made it disappears so quickly that there is no instrumentation that can read it or currently discern a pattern (and that is why we will discover more and more isotopes to almost no end).




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