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Japan declares 'nuclear emergency' after quake

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posted on Apr, 6 2011 @ 11:19 PM
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I'll just leave this here:





posted on Apr, 6 2011 @ 11:23 PM
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reply to post by ikonoklast

It is basically vindication IMO. There is no way the corium from reactor #3 is inside that building. All that is left of the RPV now is a huge vertical piece of pipe. I now believe that the posters who were saying they thought they saw the lid of the reactor in the explosion were probably right.

The actual corium is sitting underneath the building inside the bedrock. Apparently the rock can dissipate enough heat to keep it from moving down, at least quickly. If not, we would already have seen a steam explosion that would have dwarfed the last one. The small amount of steam indicates that the corium is now quite probably solid again, floating in seawater mostly encased in the bedrock. That steam is very hazardous, containing isotopes ranging from strontium-90 to iodine-131 to chlorine-36 and everything in between. A cool, solid mass of corium puts out just as much heat and radiation as a superheated liquid mass of corium. The heat of a meltdown is a reaction, not a cause.

Every shift of the tides is pumping that highly radioactive seawater back out into the Pacific or water back into the cracks around the corium. Seawater levels will continue to rise until everything in that area is dead. Beyond this kill zone, there will be a larger buffer zone that will harbor dying and mutating species, but will still support some kind of life.

I believe, based on TEPCO's actions, that the bedrock is cracked far too much to attempt a repair.

Northern Japan is a dead zone without knowing it. Anything within 50 miles is going to die prematurely, some fairly quickly. It will remain an uninhabitable zone for what is practically eternity.

Other countries... well, I expect there to be an adjustment on the US west coast to deal with higher radiation levels in the water. The air contamination is slowly easing, which makes me believe that it was caused by the initial explosion at #3 and not by continuing contamination of the air. Obviously, the US will be the foremost major country to see widespread effects, although the coasts of China and Russia will see some appreciable contamination as well, probably higher than the US. Smaller countries like North and South Korea will also be affected significantly.

The extent of international effects will be ultimately determined not by #3, but by #1 and #2, and possibly by #5 and #6. The plant will soon become completely unworkable; those brave heroes are going to die. Soon. I doubt they will be able to keep things under wraps after that, and therefore will be unable to get more workers. If there are reactions occurring in those other reactors, they will probably explode as well without human intervention. Ironically, the best case with #1 and #2 will be that they are melting into the bedrock as well, contaminating the Pacific more, but not blowing more isotopes into the upper atmosphere to be dumped on other countries.

The spent fuel pools will be a local problem, not an international one. They will be at least as devastating as the meltdowns to Japan.

We just witnessed the removal of Japan from the status of developed country, and a new era of radiation concerns worldwide.

TheRedneck



posted on Apr, 6 2011 @ 11:24 PM
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I think I found it (the crane of #3 reactor)



This image I backed out and rotated 90 degrees to show a little bit of the outside walls around #3.

In the enhancement I lightened shadows a bit more so you can see the beer can inside hte reactor building for those who are interested. If that beer can is the reactor vessel you would think that the top would have the narrow part and small cap on it, if its the bottom there should be all kinds of control rod equipment sticking out of it which I can't see. I don't know.

As for the crane the green machine from the center of the image to the lower right I believe is the remains of the crane. In this image you can see one of the crane feet dangling over the side of the building (down in the image).

It still might turn out that this is not the crane but it's my best candidate. Shouldn't it be on the other side of the reactor building though ...

To View the entire image right click and select view;




posted on Apr, 6 2011 @ 11:25 PM
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reply to post by silent thunder
 


Are you still over there?

It looks like the winds going to whip everything back to Tokyo soon.



posted on Apr, 6 2011 @ 11:28 PM
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Originally posted by TheRedneck
reply to post by ikonoklast

It is basically vindication IMO. There is no way the corium from reactor #3 is inside that building. All that is left of the RPV now is a huge vertical piece of pipe. I now believe that the posters who were saying they thought they saw the lid of the reactor in the explosion were probably right.



I think at this point I must add....a picture is worth a thousand words.






posted on Apr, 6 2011 @ 11:29 PM
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reply to post by DancedWithWolves

I opened a tab to that link for later reading... almost bedtime here.

I mentioned several times earlier in this thread that it is completely possible that the control rods were damaged in the quake, meaning they might not have fully inserted during the SCRAM. Insertion is not instantaneous, although it is fast. It simply might not have been fast enough. The tolerances between the rods is so tight that warping on a scale impossible to see with the naked eye could cause catastrophe.

I wonder if those cows would mind if I joined them out back? I would like to have a little discussion with TEPCO myself....


TheRedneck



posted on Apr, 6 2011 @ 11:32 PM
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Originally posted by notsofunnyguy
reply to post by silent thunder
 


It does indeed seem that way. I don't know to what extent this radiation will be a problem. Keep your eyes on the geiger readings coming out of Tokyo in the next 12 hours or so. If the readings I get differ substantially from the major independent sites and/or the "official" readings (which they haven't thus far), I'll alert the board.



posted on Apr, 6 2011 @ 11:35 PM
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reply to post by SDoradus

I think you are referring to the base of the spent fuel pool. Those mechanical looking things on it would be what's left of the casings that used to hold fuel rods (I am assuming you mean the area running vertical in the picture near the left side).



TheRedneck



posted on Apr, 6 2011 @ 11:36 PM
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I have been reading up on Arnie's work is pretty impresive and extremely helpful with matching measurements systems like theirs and ours as internal exposure go.
check it out if you get time.
Radiation Experts Determine 200,000 Cancers Likely from Fukushima
www.fairewinds.com...



posted on Apr, 6 2011 @ 11:37 PM
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reply to post by silent thunder
 


what's the mood of the public like nowdays?
thanks



posted on Apr, 6 2011 @ 11:39 PM
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reply to post by silent thunder

Please be ready to bunker in, just in case. It looks like they will be getting a substantial spike in readings. The spike will be rather short-lived, but there could be trouble in the streets. That's a lot of (gullible) people to panic.

TheRedneck



posted on Apr, 6 2011 @ 11:39 PM
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reply to post by silent thunder
 


Sounds good.

Stay safe.



posted on Apr, 6 2011 @ 11:40 PM
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reply to post by silent thunder
 


That gif image confirms the reports from S.Korea, i see a plume separating and heading south away from main plume.

I am in the Philippines, i wonder how far south the radiation will travel.


edit on 6-4-2011 by The Great Day because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 6 2011 @ 11:40 PM
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Originally posted by rbrtj
All this talk of food is making me hungry


Have a slice of orange





posted on Apr, 6 2011 @ 11:44 PM
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reply to post by TheRedneck
 


Thank you for your detailed analysis, I really appreciate it. This thread is arguably the best source of continuing information for what is happening at the reactors. Your continuing input and expertise is a big part of that.



posted on Apr, 6 2011 @ 11:48 PM
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Originally posted by zorgon

Originally posted by rbrtj
All this talk of food is making me hungry


Have a slice of orange




LOL I just ate an orange thankyou!!
! is my limit this close to bed time.



posted on Apr, 6 2011 @ 11:54 PM
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Originally posted by Tworide
reply to post by MedievalGhost
 


It looks like Japan Times has pulled that article, why am I not surprised...


Sorry. I forgot to add the 'l' on the end of the link. Correct link below:

link
edit on 6-4-2011 by MedievalGhost because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 7 2011 @ 12:02 AM
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oops
edit on 7-4-2011 by OuttaHere because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 7 2011 @ 12:03 AM
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Originally posted by rbrtj
I have been reading up on Arnie's work is pretty impresive and extremely helpful with matching measurements systems like theirs and ours as internal exposure go.
check it out if you get time.
Radiation Experts Determine 200,000 Cancers Likely from Fukushima
www.fairewinds.com...


Attention fellow space travelers...
Arnie's formula formulates the cancer rate for all malignancies in the Japanese population is 462 per100,000 per year. Therefore the annual number of cancers in the 3,388,900 populationof the 100km radius is 15,656. In ten years there will be 156,560 cancers normally ifthis 2005 rate is maintained plus an extra 66% of this number diagnosed fromFukushima that is 103,329 extra cancers due to the Fukushima exposures.



posted on Apr, 7 2011 @ 12:03 AM
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Originally posted by okiecowboy
reply to post by silent thunder
 


what's the mood of the public like nowdays?
thanks


I think there is a large degree of denial but if you walk around the streets its easy to lose yourself in the perceived normlacy. Ever since this event I have noticed a kind of nihilsitic abandon bubble up in certain contexts, usually inappropriately. Panic sex. I have tried to put it into words before but never completely satisfactorially. There is a kind of very Japanese/Northeast-Asian "closing ranks"/patriotism effect at work on some level, too, whereby excessive talking about or complaining about the situation is somehow frowmed upon. Actually this should be viscerally undertstandable to most people on the board; witness the sentiment in NYC following 9-11, etc.

I think the city will hold up and pull through if (big if) the radiation does not become a significant issue.



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