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Japan declares 'nuclear emergency' after quake

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posted on Apr, 6 2011 @ 01:29 PM
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Originally posted by unityemissions

Originally posted by zorgon
What happened to the thread?


The sense of novelty has run it's course. Now we'll need super, mega, uber doom topic to draw as much attention.



I have a feeling that TEPCO are working hard to give us exactly that




posted on Apr, 6 2011 @ 01:36 PM
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reply to post by MedievalGhost
 

Particularly

'it can cause an exothermic reaction that can lead to melting of the metal.'

Umm. Melting of the metal... as in melting the reactor vessel? This sounds bad, because TEPCO stated they are going to pump nitrogen into reactor 1 over several days.


I don't even know what the effect would be on the reactor vessel. My concern is the fuel rods, which are made of zircalloy. If any fuel rods are exposed and they come into contact with nitrogen gas in a low-oxygen environment, then they can react exothermically and melt.

Mike



posted on Apr, 6 2011 @ 01:39 PM
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reply to post by OuttaHere
 


this is a PDF copy of the complete NRC assessment quoted in the NYTimes article

docs.google.com...

it was obtained by djysrv.blogspot.com...
edit on 6-4-2011 by monica86 because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 6 2011 @ 01:40 PM
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reply to post by Destinyone
 

Hi des,

thanks for that extract you've quoted. I admit that I still don't know a great deal about cold-fusion reactions under these conditions, but it seems to me that what's being tried with these damaged reactors is like some kind of ill-thought-out, ongoing set of semi-random nuclear experiments.

"Trying out" solutions with damaged nuclear reactors is scary enough, but when some of the solutions might create worse problems than existed before I hate to think where they will lead.

Mike



posted on Apr, 6 2011 @ 01:40 PM
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first off good call on this webcam image(good eye man):

several interesting things in it , if you have the originally sized one we can match it up :



and I believe now we are seeing some kind of obfuscation at the night web cam because this "noise" is 'odd' as it is not consistent with anything we have seen so far



The trouble at #6 was confirmed to be from an uncontrolled criticality it is likely that has restarted and more importantly I believe the nitrogen injection (at #1 if that's the only place) is designed to melt, let me repeat myself :

DESIGNED TO MELT because if they can get it hot enough in there I think they believe they can get the mass to start tunneling down and I don't think they want proof of that operation to be visible, especially when it fails miserably (unless there is more at work here, as always some from column a some from column b )

the photo op withe guy in the white bunny suit , is just that a photo op , the suit is far to clean for that guuy to be doing anything and I sure as hell wouldn't want to be adjusting my mask outside inan environment like that unless I just put it on ....

...at any rate, it's classic misdirection , see the pit see the pit , but....I believe what they are trying to prove is two fold :

one the radiation is not toxic by that pit and
two it's not near the ocean

also that's a brand new elbow on the big pipe, it's not somethin one throws on in ten miuntesunder te best of conditions , so something odd ...


I believe they may have been sharing coolant between the damaged #2 and #1 and numbers 5 and 6 hence contaminating them in critical ways, and giving us the first disaster that is 100% human error
( remember the Canadian worker said that on the first day " the plant was totally destroyed, I don't think it will ever open again " it's almost certainly why Tepco did not want fire fighters in there ( For Tepco (and probably the whole nuclear industry)cover-up is business as usual and that's exactly what the corp manager morons thought they could do at first , which is why the russians experts blasted them as" failing to use several incidents to avoid the current situation " ))
edit on 6-4-2011 by Silverlok because: (no reason given)

edit on 6-4-2011 by Silverlok because: whatits

edit on 6-4-2011 by Silverlok because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 6 2011 @ 01:41 PM
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Originally posted by JustMike
reply to post by MedievalGhost
 

Particularly

'it can cause an exothermic reaction that can lead to melting of the metal.'

Umm. Melting of the metal... as in melting the reactor vessel? This sounds bad, because TEPCO stated they are going to pump nitrogen into reactor 1 over several days.


I don't even know what the effect would be on the reactor vessel. My concern is the fuel rods, which are made of zircalloy. If any fuel rods are exposed and they come into contact with nitrogen gas in a low-oxygen environment, then they can react exothermically and melt.

Mike


Based upon the surplus energy, if those caloric figures per mol are true, I would expect that to be a pretty violent reaction, no? It has been over twenty years since I did any calculations like that...



posted on Apr, 6 2011 @ 01:43 PM
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Originally posted by JustMike
reply to post by Destinyone
 

Hi des,

thanks for that extract you've quoted. I admit that I still don't know a great deal about cold-fusion reactions under these conditions, but it seems to me that what's being tried with these damaged reactors is like some kind of ill-thought-out, ongoing set of semi-random nuclear experiments.

"Trying out" solutions with damaged nuclear reactors is scary enough, but when some of the solutions might create worse problems than existed before I hate to think where they will lead.

Mike


Wow. That IS a scary thought.

I can see the guys on the ISS looking out their window as a mushroom cloud goes up and saying, "Well, THAT didn't work."



posted on Apr, 6 2011 @ 01:44 PM
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Originally posted by brocktoon

Originally posted by JustMike
reply to post by MedievalGhost
 

Particularly

'it can cause an exothermic reaction that can lead to melting of the metal.'

Umm. Melting of the metal... as in melting the reactor vessel? This sounds bad, because TEPCO stated they are going to pump nitrogen into reactor 1 over several days.


I don't even know what the effect would be on the reactor vessel. My concern is the fuel rods, which are made of zircalloy. If any fuel rods are exposed and they come into contact with nitrogen gas in a low-oxygen environment, then they can react exothermically and melt.

Mike


Based upon the surplus energy, if those caloric figures per mol are true, I would expect that to be a pretty violent reaction, no? It has been over twenty years since I did any calculations like that...


melt or explode , perhaps Tepco is now banking on that as "less traceable" than more ocean dumping for attempts at controlled meltdown



posted on Apr, 6 2011 @ 01:45 PM
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Originally posted by Curio

Also makes you wonder - if these things can go on at something as sensitive and (supposedly) regulated as a nuclear power station, what on earth goes on at other places...


You don't have a need to know



posted on Apr, 6 2011 @ 01:45 PM
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The plan to cover reactor buildings with radiation-shielding sheets to block radiation leakage
wont happen until at least September...



After studying the possibility of installing radiation-shielding sheets around Fukushima reactors upon a request by Japan's government, Tokyo Electric Power Co. (TEPCO) said such sheeting cannot be installed until September because of the persisting high-level of radioactivity at the power station.

TEPCO said installment needs to be postponed until radiation levels at the site, where a number of hydrogen explosions have blown away the roofs and upper walls of three reactor buildings, is reduced.

On Wednesday, TEPCO also began the process of injecting nitrogen, an inert gas, into the containment vessel of the reactor No.1 to reduce the risk of more hydrogen explosions. www.presstv.ir...



edit on 6-4-2011 by burntheships because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 6 2011 @ 01:46 PM
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reply to post by zorgon

High level of iodine-131 detected in Fukushima

300,000 Bq/cc?!?


Ow-che-wa-wa!

I ran a few calcs and that gives an estimated content of 0.0672 µg/L... still far below the observed solubility of iodine, 0.289 g/L. That means that the iodine-131 is still far from saturated, but even at that low a level a single liter of seawater is releasing 46.6µJ of energy in beta and gamma emissions. That doesn't sound like a lot, but it is far above normal iodine saturation and the energy release is far above what the thyroid could stand if it were accumulated in it.

Seriously dangerous levels...

TheRedneck



posted on Apr, 6 2011 @ 01:47 PM
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Going to paraphrase Turkish here....

You took the f**king jam outta my doughnut, TEPCO. You did.

Exothermic reactions with a good possibility of nitrogen triiodide... break out the sunglasses and look for the pretty lights gentlemen.



posted on Apr, 6 2011 @ 01:50 PM
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Originally posted by unityemissions
The sense of novelty has run it's course. Now we'll need super, mega, uber doom topic to draw as much attention.


perhaps... wait for it...

but this case was all of ATS had a momentary glitch that allowed only page 1 to be seen in a thread... there is a thread on it in BB...

Must have been a radiation spike huh?



posted on Apr, 6 2011 @ 01:50 PM
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Originally posted by Destinyone

Originally posted by unityemissions

Originally posted by zorgon
What happened to the thread?


The sense of novelty has run it's course. Now we'll need super, mega, uber doom topic to draw as much attention.



I think everyone here, is still in silent shock, at the super, mega, uber, doom scenario that is.


I'm not in shock, just bored with it really. Nothing much to be done.

It seems to be about the same scale disaster as the BP spill. Horrible, but not quite super, mega, uber,lol.

I reserve that category for a real ELE.
edit on 6-4-2011 by unityemissions because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 6 2011 @ 01:50 PM
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There is conflicting information over what details U.S. officials know
about Fukushima Daiichi and the threat, and what information is being released.

*No...! really?*




On Wednesday, Rep. Ed Markey (D., Mass.) raised alarm bells when he claimed that the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission believes the core of Fukushima's Unit Two had "gotten so hot that part of it has probably melted through the reactor pressure vessel."

If the reactor vessel has in fact been breached, it removes a line of defense in a set of barriers aimed at protecting the public. Shortly after Markey made this claim during a House hearing, however, a top U.S. nuclear official disputed the claim.

"That's not in the situation report that we have from the team in Japan," said Martin Virgilio, deputy executive director for reactor and preparedness programs at the Nuclear Regulatory Commission, while speaking to reporters Wednesday. " And that [report is] as of this morning." www.nasdaq.com... panese-nuclear-reactor



posted on Apr, 6 2011 @ 01:53 PM
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I wonder if the "public Ocean dumping operation" ( being SOO much smaller than weeks of leaking ) was them testing the international reaction to them trying another controlled melt down ( 6 with the the water being moved to 1or 2 to drain into the ocean through the still larger than a piss fixture unfixed leak) and the resultant ocean contamination , and when it actually got some very negative public attention they shifted gears to the nitrogen gamble
edit on 6-4-2011 by Silverlok because: clarity



posted on Apr, 6 2011 @ 01:55 PM
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Looks like they've started in on reactor #1

english.kyodonews.jp...

I especially like this part:




Nitrogen, an inert gas, was injected into the No. 1 reactor's containment vessel, a process that could take several days. Hidehiko Nishiyama, a spokesman for the government's Nuclear and Industrial Safety Agency, denied there is an ''immediate danger'' of explosion and described the injection as ''a preventive measure.''


They just LOVE using qualifying terms to cover their @sses.

If this stuff starts reacting, anybody know how long it would take before we get a boom?



posted on Apr, 6 2011 @ 01:55 PM
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reply to post by SFA437

I highly doubt the corium was blown out. the hydrogen that caused the initial explosion would have concentrated itself high in the containment, so any force form that explosion would have pushed the corium/core downward. The steam explosion that followed immediately was form around the corium itself. so that would have not blown it skyward.

I believe the plant grounds were contaminated from the spent fuel pool contents. For several days after this started, we didn't even know there was spent fuel pool contents at #3!

The corium is still there, happily reacting away inside the cracked bedrock...

TheRedneck



posted on Apr, 6 2011 @ 01:58 PM
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Originally posted by notsofunnyguy
Looks like they've started in on reactor #1

english.kyodonews.jp...

I especially like this part:




Nitrogen, an inert gas, was injected into the No. 1 reactor's containment vessel, a process that could take several days. Hidehiko Nishiyama, a spokesman for the government's Nuclear and Industrial Safety Agency, denied there is an ''immediate danger'' of explosion and described the injection as ''a preventive measure.''


They just LOVE using qualifying terms to cover their @sses.

If this stuff starts reacting, anybody know how long it would take before we get a boom?



That just about confirms it that TEPCO is reading this thread.



posted on Apr, 6 2011 @ 01:59 PM
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reply to post by TheRedneck
 


I did say everything but the core- especially with the release of the fact there's spent fuel rods strewn about the landscape and nearby ocean like a set of Lincoln Logs.

I still think that large falling object was the secondary containment lid or the RPV lid which means (to me anyway) the corium hit a flooded basement, the water flashed into steam and blew back upwards through the containment structure.




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