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Japan declares 'nuclear emergency' after quake

page: 558.htm
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posted on Apr, 5 2011 @ 05:48 PM
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reply to post by ElectricalEngineer41
 


No luck... I found the picture on 510 of this thread but with all concrete forms I could not tell squat and google earth crashed my machine

I'm going to try Japan Geology or the geology of Japan... Be back in 10 pages.




posted on Apr, 5 2011 @ 05:48 PM
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reply to post by JustMike
 


Mike,
in The Day After refusal to accept the satus quo was repeated with various characeters several times. Just like real life.
The eco system will suffer exactly as you have explained but somehow it recovers.

There is some life in the Chernobly deadzone.

People used to drink radium to cure cancer and it worked sometimes.

Hiroshima and Nagasaki operate as cities. Maybe some of us are semi immune to low levels.

So ..........things are bad and can be worse but it's not the end.

Just different.



posted on Apr, 5 2011 @ 05:55 PM
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Originally posted by gr82m8okdok

Originally posted by Procharmo
I so want to believe Pu-239 is not dangerous and all the weapons testing proves that it shouldn't be of any concern. But........

Source


On August 23, 1994, a plutonium worker at the Los Alamos National Laboratory Chemistry and Metallurgy Research Facility accidentally injured herself while removing plutonium oxides from small samples of plutonium metal with a jeweler's file. She punctured the glove-box glove and the backside of her left thumb with the file. A radiological control technician performed several wholebody surveys of the worker with negative results and then escorted her to the occupational health medical facility for assessment and treatment of the puncture wound. The wound count indicated 8.58 nanocuries of plutonium-239 inside the wound. After non-intrusive decontamination methods were unsuccessful, a physician performed three excisions reducing the contamination to 0.46 nanocuries. There was no contamination to the worker's skin nor any spread of contamination outside the glove-box. (ORPS Report ALO-LA-LANL-CMR-1994-0022)

The plutonium worker was wearing a laboratory coat, booties, and a pair of surgical gloves as required for this operation. After puncturing the back of her thumb, she left the work area, monitored her hands and booties, found no detectable radioactivity, and reported the accident to her supervisor. The supervisor contacted a radiological control technician who performed two whole body surveys on the worker, surveyed the work area, and found no detectable radioactivity. The worker also submitted nose swipes which resulted in no detectable radioactivity. After surgical decontamination of the puncture wound, medical personnel sutured and bandaged the worker's thumb and dosimetry personnel issued a special bioassay kit to the worker.

Facility managers critiqued the event and determined that the current method of preparing small plutonium metal samples by removing the metal oxides with a small jeweler's file is too hazardous to be used for this application. Alternate methods, such as using sample holders or contained mechanical cleaning, are being considered.

Based on review of the ORPS data base, it appears that contaminated puncture wounds occur infrequently at DOE facilities. Following are two examples of similar occurrences.


So just a small cut and a spec of Pu-239 dust and they want to hack a pound of flesh out of you!!!!


On October 5, 1992, a nuclear chemist cleaning up contaminated glassware in a glove-box in the heavy element facility at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory punctured his glove and thumb with a curium-244 contaminated pipette. Evaluation of the decontaminated wound indicated 0.3 nanocuries residual and 41 nanocuries in the excised tissue. (ORPS Report SAN--LLNL-LLNL-1992-0090)

On December 9,1993, a worker disassembling wooden boxes in a glove-box in Building 707 at Rocky Flats punctured his hand on the box nails. The wound was contaminated to a level of 21,000 disintegrations per minute. After surgical decontamination, the final wound count was 5,500 disintegrations per minute. (ORPS Report RFO--EGGR-PUFAB-1993-0194)

Although contaminated puncture wounds are not common at DOE facilities, such wounds can present a serious hazard to the people involved, requiring surgical excision, medical treatment, and monitoring. Most such accidents can be avoided through thorough job preplanning, including careful task analysis, provision of appropriate tooling and protective devices, awareness of the work environment, and attention to detail.


How can we not be concerned.

www.osti.gov...
"This report summarizes 4 years of research achievements in this Office of Science (BER), U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) project. The research described was conducted by scientists and supporting staff at Lovelace Respiratory Research Institute (LRRI)/Lovelace Biomedical and Environmental Research Institute (LBERI) and the Southern Urals Biophysics Institute (SUBI). All project objectives and goals were achieved. A major focus was on obtaining improved cancer risk estimates for exposure via inhalation to plutonium (Pu) isotopes in the workplace (DOE radiation workers) and environment (public exposures to Pu-contaminated soil). A major finding was that low doses and dose rates of gamma rays can significantly suppress cancer induction by alpha radiation from inhaled Pu isotopes. The suppression relates to stimulation of the body's natural defenses, including immunity against cancer cells and selective apoptosis which removes precancerous and other aberrant cells. Agreed. How can we not!


I totally believe you. I mentioned radium drinkers in previous posts. Good for some and not for others.
Man has not really began to learn about the real wide ranging effects of many of these isotopes on a large range of organisms. If they have then they may as another member suggested hide the fact the nuclear weapons are not quite what we imagined.

However the explosive power cannot be argued with. 5 mile wide fireballs and the ability to vaporise small Islands is to much in my opinion.
Even if life goes on after the fallout.



posted on Apr, 5 2011 @ 05:56 PM
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Originally posted by rbrtj
reply to post by ElectricalEngineer41
 


No luck... I found the picture on 510 of this thread but with all concrete forms I could not tell squat and google earth crashed my machine

I'm going to try Japan Geology or the geology of Japan... Be back in 10 pages.


www.showcaves.com...
take a look at thje lime stone deposits..... what few there are.
Nuclear storage??????
unit.aist.go.jp...
edit on 5-4-2011 by rbrtj because: found better link

www.gsj.jp...
edit on 5-4-2011 by rbrtj because: it just gets worse



posted on Apr, 5 2011 @ 05:57 PM
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Originally posted by Curio

Originally posted by JustMike
reply to post by Stratus9
 

Yes, that movie "The Day After" was one of the most horrifying I have ever seen. I had the video and watched it many times. One of the most chilling points I recall is that at the end, they point out that the movie is only a dramatized depiction of the events: the reality would be far worse.


"The Day After" was like an episode of Teletubies compared to "Threads" - a British TV film from the early 80's (very low budget) that was not even aired on TV for many years because it was so graphic and disturbing. If you have the stomach, it's on Youtube.



I was about to post about Threads until I read your comment. Very bleak film. The impression I had of The Day After was that it almost gave the impression that a nuclear attack was survivable with the right " can do " attitude, almost winnable kind of thing. No such optimism with Threads...

Another good ( heh) was is The War Game, a BBC production from 1965, banned for general broadcast for 20 on the grounds of being too horrific for public broadcast. More innocent times back then, obviously.

To get back on track, a whole lotta radiation is almost guaranteed to ruin your day, as those 3 films above illustrate.



posted on Apr, 5 2011 @ 06:04 PM
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Originally posted by rbrtj

Originally posted by Procharmo
reply to post by rbrtj
 


Hi, I think on Google maps you can see a substantial drop in the ground level behind the plant indicating it may have been built on a higher level. Not sure if it was bed rock or reclaimed land. Looks like a kind of stone/concrete retaining wall.

Source




Alrighty then, I'll pull up my over heads and dive in farther and look to see if and where the fill came nearby,(gravel pit).
Thanks for not poop poo my idea out right, I just spend time in dirt and that don't like any thing I would build something so heavy.
Lets look at the photo of it being built that would tell us if it was blasted out or dug???
I got the images but can't get them to load on to sight, can you or some one do it?
Thanks, for your insights and talents...




No problem. I couldn't find the one about 30 pages back with the cap lying in the foreground. But here's an even better one showing concrete slabs and what looks like wooden formers for pouring more concrete. I'm not a civil engineer so I'll leave the jargon to you.

Source



edit on 5-4-2011 by Procharmo because: Formatting



posted on Apr, 5 2011 @ 06:10 PM
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Good God


According to the engineering specs for Earth, without phytoplankton making life from nonlife, there would be little life in the ocean, perhaps none in Japan or just about anywhere else. But this year the phytoplankton that feed everything else in the sea, one or four trophic levels removed, are likely to be sporting a couple of far-out new ingredients: iodine-131 and cesium-137.


Whatever pathways the Fukushima poisons take, they will certainly alter the springtime blossoming of Japan's ocean, starting with the phytoplankton and working up the foodweb. As for the effects on the rest of the world ocean, it's a matter of how much, how far, and for how long Fukushima's newborn radionuclides go sailing.

motherjones.com...



posted on Apr, 5 2011 @ 06:11 PM
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Take a look at thje lime stone deposits..... what few there are.
See also
www.showcaves.com...
I have to run an errand I will be back asap
Rbrtj

edit on 5-4-2011 by rbrtj because: in a hurry



posted on Apr, 5 2011 @ 06:12 PM
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Originally posted by Curio

Originally posted by JustMike
reply to post by Stratus9
 

Yes, that movie "The Day After" was one of the most horrifying I have ever seen. I had the video and watched it many times. One of the most chilling points I recall is that at the end, they point out that the movie is only a dramatized depiction of the events: the reality would be far worse.


"The Day After" was like an episode of Teletubies compared to "Threads" - a British TV film from the early 80's (very low budget) that was not even aired on TV for many years because it was so graphic and disturbing. If you have the stomach, it's on Youtube.


Just watched The Day After hence my signature. Now watching Threads then off to bed! Thanks for the info.



posted on Apr, 5 2011 @ 06:13 PM
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reply to post by Procharmo
 
I'm sure glad to have you on the ATS team. Thanks for the many teachable moments you give me, I'm really new to all of this.



posted on Apr, 5 2011 @ 06:25 PM
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reply to post by Procharmo
 



Limestone Distribution in Japan

www.showcaves.com...

Boy from this map they have it doesn't look like many hard spots on that Island
Can you post this limestone map over one with the plant area?

edit on 5-4-2011 by rbrtj because: goofed up



posted on Apr, 5 2011 @ 06:33 PM
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reply to post by lernmore
 





Outflow of highly radioactive water into sea stops: TEPCO


Good news, I hope it continues to work. Okay one down
and how many more to go? Thank you for the update!



posted on Apr, 5 2011 @ 06:38 PM
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reply to post by Procharmo
 


looks like they might be making a quick makeshift holding pool in order to safely hold the water for treatment before dumping. Those could be forms, but they are missing their panels.



posted on Apr, 5 2011 @ 06:39 PM
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reply to post by crazydaisy
 


NO WATER IN NO WATER OUT?????



posted on Apr, 5 2011 @ 06:43 PM
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reply to post by crazydaisy
 

you're way too optomistic. Just like the damn vet that I had to deal with last night that figured giving the SPCA a call because I'd diagnosed my cat (properly of course) with a blood clot, and observed pathology of ATE in the aortic trifurcation. I wanted to give my cat a freakin aspirin, could have saved it's life ---> freaking monsters. Of course, the water pumping stopped, they now have a pool to fill up with the more radioactive stuff before they end up having to dump that in there too. I'm willing to bet that they have ceased cooling because their dumping problem is a little out of hand and that extra pool is to buy them some more time. My diagnosis, they are still fighting a losing battle but playing with people's perspective of it and what they are doing in order to make it look like they have a handle on it when they so clearly don't. Yes it has stopped for now, and will resume later. Let's see how long they can put off the next dump.



posted on Apr, 5 2011 @ 06:47 PM
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reply to post by rbrtj
 


I'm sorry but I'd need Photoshop to make one layer translucent. Did that photo of the grounds/foundations help any?

Here's the best I can quickly do with MS paint. Trust me I'm not a graphic artist.





posted on Apr, 5 2011 @ 06:47 PM
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Originally posted by getreadyalready
Couldn't they have constructed a bulkhead wall around the entire plant by now? If they could build a wall around the entire site, then they could flood it with sea water.


leaks all over the cracked foundations... wouldn't hold water... which is the problem right now



posted on Apr, 5 2011 @ 06:48 PM
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reply to post by Procharmo
 


That picture was taken in 1997, the original plants were built in the 70's, I wonder if that is a new pool or recator for the MOX fuel, Not sure what year they added #5-6 reactors.
Can we put the lime stone map from the sight I found over the map of japan to see if the plant is even close to lime stone.



posted on Apr, 5 2011 @ 06:49 PM
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Originally posted by notsofunnyguy
Not glowing = eat
Glowing = don't eat


You know what? That is a FANTASTIC idea... radioactive particles react very brightly under UV light... just put your food under UV light and...
Not glowing = eat
Glowing = don't eat





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