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Japan declares 'nuclear emergency' after quake

page: 557.htm
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posted on Apr, 5 2011 @ 04:22 PM
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Originally posted by zorgon

So the level in fish is "no immediate risk to health"; the level within that radius of 30km is "no immediate risk to health"; the vegetables are "no immediate risk to health"; the drinking water is "no immediate risk to health"....

but has ANYONE calculated the TOTAL intact from ALL these sources combined?]


The key terminology here is 'Immediate'. This means it will not make you sick or kill you 'Immediately'.

Speaking of immediate: for everyone that is too young to have caught it, The Day After, a movie that was aired in 1983, is on Youtube in parts. The scenario is the after effects of an all out nuclear war between the U.S. and Russia. I remember watching it in '83 and it was horrifying. Amazing that they would show that on TV back then. I do remember they kept breaking to recommend that neither children nor sensitive adults watch it. It was extremely well researched and the entire scenario, the physical ailments, symptoms, etc were scientifically valid.

It is a bit depressing. But I also remember that the buzz on this was amazing over the few weeks before and after it aired and I do believe the end result was positive, politically and otherwise. People started putting heavy, heavy pressure on the U.S. Government and Russia as well as East Germany to 'cut the # out completely.'

It is a 1983 TV production so don't expect Star Wars effects - and the music is a bit cheesy. But altogether very much worth watching. And I still would not allow kids or sensitive adults to view.




posted on Apr, 5 2011 @ 04:25 PM
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Originally posted by IDBIT

Check this pic out from the Tepco observatory :-

static.panoramio.com...



I completely agree that the webcam is from the Tepco observatory, this is the picture found by IDBIT:



This is the very first image in the webcam sequence on March 11, 1400h:



Almost identical to the view from Tepco observatory.

From the second image onwards, the webcam is lowered (obscuring a bigger part of the reactors), but still at the same xy position:



Now why would they have done that?

Mendel



posted on Apr, 5 2011 @ 04:28 PM
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Ok, here's the translation for the text in the video:



Here's what the words say:
Discharge into the No. 3 video Hiraku Hiroshi Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant. (title)
This video shows the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant disaster. (Top right corner)
There are disconnected pipes. (0:49)
Using the emergency exhaust pipe. (0:55)
No exhaust through the filters. (1:00)
The impact of the tsunami so far (1:37)
Desperate recovery efforts continue. (2:04)


Regarding audio portion:



It might take me a bit longer to do the audio cuz it's a bit difficult. All I can say is that I have learned waaaayyyy too many new complicated words that I will probably never use unless I major in engineering. lol


Source: Facebook inbox.

Sorry I can't seem to find the video, it's way back in the thread originally posted by Zorgon and I don't know how to link a YouTube video from my iPhone.

Very little to go on so far, but it may help identify something to one of our in-house experts. As soon as she gets me the translation of the audio, I will post it as well.



posted on Apr, 5 2011 @ 04:31 PM
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Originally posted by DancedWithWolves
Beyond that, it may be time for our best and brightest to figure out what happens when this all leaks out - and I don't mean the information, but rather the radiation. What are people facing? Yes, I know we don't have disclosure yet on what all (MOX fuel) is stored, processed, used, hidden at this plant. But with just the givens of probably six nuclear reactors going poof in one way or another...what is ahead for the world's inhabitants - walkers and swimmers?


Wow- I just had a flash image of a Japanese man blowing his head off on national TV when I was reading this paragraph. Literal or figurative? Not sure.



posted on Apr, 5 2011 @ 04:31 PM
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reply to post by TheRemedial
 


Um I distinctly heard 3 distinct explosive sounds & the echos of them....

So what was the 3rd bang, the bottom water tank?



posted on Apr, 5 2011 @ 04:34 PM
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Originally posted by Kailassa

The latest web-cam shot:

shows a definite fire where the crane was.
Makes one wonder just what was it doing.


I don't think it's a fire but water vapor/steam illuminated by the sun.

Mendel



posted on Apr, 5 2011 @ 04:35 PM
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reply to post by webworker
 


Thanks for the link, I know last week i went to the EPA link and noticed they had readings prior to the blast (3-11) and it then went comepletely blank after 3-11and I imediately posted the link so some one else could confirm. Thanks again



posted on Apr, 5 2011 @ 04:42 PM
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Here is the latest from RT:
Immeasurable levels of radiation reported at Fukushima plant

Off the scale levels - wow. This could be the Wormwood that the Book of Revelations refers to.

I pray to god I'm not right...



posted on Apr, 5 2011 @ 04:44 PM
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Originally posted by Moshpet
reply to post by TheRemedial
 


Um I distinctly heard 3 distinct explosive sounds & the echos of them....

So what was the 3rd bang, the bottom water tank?


They're not explosions they were most likely structural failure sounds. I can't say for sure what the sounds were but what they were not were the explosive events seen on video.

IMO something big was coming apart around 30 seconds before the explosions (there were 2 separate distinct explosive events).



posted on Apr, 5 2011 @ 04:45 PM
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reply to post by Stratus9
 

Yes, that movie "The Day After" was one of the most horrifying I have ever seen. I had the video and watched it many times. One of the most chilling points I recall is that at the end, they point out that the movie is only a dramatized depiction of the events: the reality would be far worse.

And here we are with a nuclear "accident" that I expect is far, far worse than any scenario that experts or analysts had ever imagined possible -- short of direct attacks upon multiple reactors in the context of a war. Something like this just should not be able to happen. But it has.

And here we are with TEPCO spinning a web of careful distraction by trying to focus attention on a leaking crack in a concrete pit, even while they don't explain why they left Reactor #4 out of a recent data analysis of isotopes found in leaking water from reactors 1, 2, 3, 5 and 6. Even while they will not tell us what is truly going on in this now God-forsaken place.

And here we are, wondering what the future will bring to the people of Japan -- and also to all of us who live in other parts of this one, small world that is our only home.

I was watching a video report on NHK TV a while ago. It was a feelgood report, about the blossoms and how beautiful they are, how ethereal they are.

And that got me thinking about the bees. The main pollinators. The bees will be going from flower to flower, collecting nectar as they go, and besides the nectar, they pick up pollen and transfer it to other flowers. And think about it: flowers in the fallout zone that covers so many hundreds of square miles... those flowers will have radioactive fallout. The bees will collect it. The ground water in places is also radioactive, as is the rain... And that means the nectar that these bees collect and take back to the hives for other worker bees to use to make honey -- well, it will be radioactive.

So, the honey that the worker bees make will be as well. And the bees that eat that honey?

What will happen if the bees start dying in huge numbers? Or their behavior changes?

And then of course there are the birds: the small ones that also suck nectar from flowers, larger ones that eat insects that crawl on radiation-polluted ground, birds that eat fish that swim in radiation polluted waters...

I know that we are focused on the people, but without the bees and the natural balance in nature, food supplies will be drastically affected.

The more I think about this disaster, the worse it gets.


Mike

Note: Procharmo, you have a U2U...



posted on Apr, 5 2011 @ 04:48 PM
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reply to post by Silverlok
 


It's so sad that you couldn't suggest the people doing something themselves about it, your options suggest finding other people to do it; we must all start taking responsibility of our actions as individuals, what you contribute to this collective lunacy entirely makes almost everyone part of the problem, time to take some control of the situation back as an angry and upset people who are tired of all this.



posted on Apr, 5 2011 @ 04:50 PM
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Originally posted by Procharmo
reply to post by rbrtj
 


Hi, I think on Google maps you can see a substantial drop in the ground level behind the plant indicating it may have been built on a higher level. Not sure if it was bed rock or reclaimed land. Looks like a kind of stone/concrete retaining wall.

Source



Alrighty then, I'll pull up my over heads and dive in farther and look to see if and where the fill came nearby,(gravel pit).
Thanks for not poop poo my idea out right, I just spend time in dirt and that don't like any thing I would build something so heavy.
Lets look at the photo of it being built that would tell us if it was blasted out or dug???
I got the images but can't get them to load on to sight, can you or some one do it?
Thanks, for your insights and talents...





posted on Apr, 5 2011 @ 04:58 PM
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Originally posted by Procharmo
reply to post by rbrtj
 


Hi, I think on Google maps you can see a substantial drop in the ground level behind the plant indicating it may have been built on a higher level. Not sure if it was bed rock or reclaimed land. Looks like a kind of stone/concrete retaining wall.

Source



The ground actually goes up behind the plant. I saw some aerial photos that show it clearly so I'll try to find those.



posted on Apr, 5 2011 @ 04:59 PM
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reply to post by mendel101
 


As always nice work it's large and most likely another criticality , things seem to have been getting hot at 4 so even though it's hard to explain that one is high on the list of suspects, and it certainly points to the the white light source as an attempt to obfuscate the camera info.

here is an interesting clip about the GNES


Above all, the Partnership would be based on positive promotion of nuclear power as the core source of future global energy, and would require that public investment by the core countries flow to the most costly and dangerous option, rather than to true renewables. There are in any case serious doubts that the world has enough uranium to follow the nuclear course, even if safety and other issues could be resolved. Uranium supplies peaked in 1981, and the existing mines can supply only half the existing demand - the rest being made up from dismantled nuclear weapon stockpiles, a source likely to be exhausted by 2013. Mines currently being developed might fill half the current gap, but unless new sources are discovered and developed (a process that takes a minimum of fifteen years), even existing plants will be forced to close. [72] John Busby calculates that `[p]rimary production would have to be increased 167- fold to match the anticipated global energy needs exclusively from nuclear power in 2020', and, even if nuclear power generation could be doubled - an unlikely proposition - it would be enough to meet only 5 per cent of world energy consumption. [73] Advocates of fast-breeder reactors refer to this uranium shortfall to justify the development of new designs of reactors, despite their failure over past decades. The agenda of massive expansion - whether of the still-to-be-developed Partnership technologies or of the existing light-water reactors - is simply fantastic.


but after long thought I finally understand Tepco's main operating thrust and after all it is very zen:

"where there is no solution , there is no problem" (-John G. Price)



posted on Apr, 5 2011 @ 05:02 PM
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Originally posted by JustMike
reply to post by Stratus9
 

Yes, that movie "The Day After" was one of the most horrifying I have ever seen. I had the video and watched it many times. One of the most chilling points I recall is that at the end, they point out that the movie is only a dramatized depiction of the events: the reality would be far worse.


"The Day After" was like an episode of Teletubies compared to "Threads" - a British TV film from the early 80's (very low budget) that was not even aired on TV for many years because it was so graphic and disturbing. If you have the stomach, it's on Youtube.



posted on Apr, 5 2011 @ 05:06 PM
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reply to post by TheLastStand
 

Yes and no , I believe that I am using what we are using here ( and what Tepco appears to be trolling ) and that is crowd sourcing. To be quite frank If I were a native Japanese and my country were forever changed is this senseless and greedy fashion, I would be out there MacGyvering together a thermal camera out of old Video recorders and getting that information....



posted on Apr, 5 2011 @ 05:07 PM
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Originally posted by Procharmo
I so want to believe Pu-239 is not dangerous and all the weapons testing proves that it shouldn't be of any concern. But........

Source


On August 23, 1994, a plutonium worker at the Los Alamos National Laboratory Chemistry and Metallurgy Research Facility accidentally injured herself while removing plutonium oxides from small samples of plutonium metal with a jeweler's file. She punctured the glove-box glove and the backside of her left thumb with the file. A radiological control technician performed several wholebody surveys of the worker with negative results and then escorted her to the occupational health medical facility for assessment and treatment of the puncture wound. The wound count indicated 8.58 nanocuries of plutonium-239 inside the wound. After non-intrusive decontamination methods were unsuccessful, a physician performed three excisions reducing the contamination to 0.46 nanocuries. There was no contamination to the worker's skin nor any spread of contamination outside the glove-box. (ORPS Report ALO-LA-LANL-CMR-1994-0022)

The plutonium worker was wearing a laboratory coat, booties, and a pair of surgical gloves as required for this operation. After puncturing the back of her thumb, she left the work area, monitored her hands and booties, found no detectable radioactivity, and reported the accident to her supervisor. The supervisor contacted a radiological control technician who performed two whole body surveys on the worker, surveyed the work area, and found no detectable radioactivity. The worker also submitted nose swipes which resulted in no detectable radioactivity. After surgical decontamination of the puncture wound, medical personnel sutured and bandaged the worker's thumb and dosimetry personnel issued a special bioassay kit to the worker.

Facility managers critiqued the event and determined that the current method of preparing small plutonium metal samples by removing the metal oxides with a small jeweler's file is too hazardous to be used for this application. Alternate methods, such as using sample holders or contained mechanical cleaning, are being considered.

Based on review of the ORPS data base, it appears that contaminated puncture wounds occur infrequently at DOE facilities. Following are two examples of similar occurrences.


So just a small cut and a spec of Pu-239 dust and they want to hack a pound of flesh out of you!!!!


On October 5, 1992, a nuclear chemist cleaning up contaminated glassware in a glove-box in the heavy element facility at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory punctured his glove and thumb with a curium-244 contaminated pipette. Evaluation of the decontaminated wound indicated 0.3 nanocuries residual and 41 nanocuries in the excised tissue. (ORPS Report SAN--LLNL-LLNL-1992-0090)

On December 9,1993, a worker disassembling wooden boxes in a glove-box in Building 707 at Rocky Flats punctured his hand on the box nails. The wound was contaminated to a level of 21,000 disintegrations per minute. After surgical decontamination, the final wound count was 5,500 disintegrations per minute. (ORPS Report RFO--EGGR-PUFAB-1993-0194)

Although contaminated puncture wounds are not common at DOE facilities, such wounds can present a serious hazard to the people involved, requiring surgical excision, medical treatment, and monitoring. Most such accidents can be avoided through thorough job preplanning, including careful task analysis, provision of appropriate tooling and protective devices, awareness of the work environment, and attention to detail.


How can we not be concerned.

www.osti.gov...
"This report summarizes 4 years of research achievements in this Office of Science (BER), U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) project. The research described was conducted by scientists and supporting staff at Lovelace Respiratory Research Institute (LRRI)/Lovelace Biomedical and Environmental Research Institute (LBERI) and the Southern Urals Biophysics Institute (SUBI). All project objectives and goals were achieved. A major focus was on obtaining improved cancer risk estimates for exposure via inhalation to plutonium (Pu) isotopes in the workplace (DOE radiation workers) and environment (public exposures to Pu-contaminated soil). A major finding was that low doses and dose rates of gamma rays can significantly suppress cancer induction by alpha radiation from inhaled Pu isotopes. The suppression relates to stimulation of the body's natural defenses, including immunity against cancer cells and selective apoptosis which removes precancerous and other aberrant cells. Agreed. How can we not!



posted on Apr, 5 2011 @ 05:27 PM
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Outflow of highly radioactive water into sea stops: TEPCO

The outflow of highly radioactive water into the Pacific Ocean from the crippled Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant has stopped after the injection of a chemical agent, Tokyo Electric Power Co. said Wednesday.


On one hand I'd like to say this is wonderful. On the other hand I'd like to know where the water is going to go now? I mean, they didn't have a place for it yesterday. Maybe today they will... Or are they giving up any idea of cooling with water now?



posted on Apr, 5 2011 @ 05:27 PM
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reply to post by Nucleardoom
 


It looks like they severely reduced the flow of water into the ocean and immediately a huge surge of radiation , I guess we find out what happens next when you can't cool a meltdown in progress



posted on Apr, 5 2011 @ 05:45 PM
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Originally posted by Aponi
Outflow of highly radioactive water into sea stops: TEPCO

The outflow of highly radioactive water into the Pacific Ocean from the crippled Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant has stopped after the injection of a chemical agent, Tokyo Electric Power Co. said Wednesday.


On one hand I'd like to say this is wonderful. On the other hand I'd like to know where the water is going to go now? I mean, they didn't have a place for it yesterday. Maybe today they will... Or are they giving up any idea of cooling with water now?


One aftershock and they can start all over again.
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I think that this will be the longest and largest thread on ATS, in 20 years on page 71,618 we finally get the report that the last rod has been recovered 5 miles of the coast (due to the earthquake and tsunami from 2017) and after disposing it they can finally finish the sarcophagus.




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