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Japan declares 'nuclear emergency' after quake

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posted on Apr, 4 2011 @ 12:46 PM
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Originally posted by Eurisko2012

Originally posted by IDBIT
Can anyone tell me why this situation is not rated at a 7?

en.wikipedia.org...



It's just a number. Does it really matter?
Everyone on Earth can see what has happened and what is happening.
Tokyo Electric public relations is sounding like Baghdad Bob.
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Just entomb reactors 1,2,3 & 4. Put a decent roof on it and call it a day.
Monitor reactors 5 & 6 and then send most of the workers down to the Fukushima II Nuclear Power
Plant. After a few years start working on a Fukushima III power plant. - Pebble Bed Reactor -


I think it matters as it would bring the gravity of the situation to light. Most people I speak to are oblivious to what's happening with the world press focusing on Libya etc.

BBC news is saying that low level water is going to be dumped into the sea to make room for the bad stuff. Makes it all sound so Dolphin friendly...

www.bbc.co.uk...




posted on Apr, 4 2011 @ 12:49 PM
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allthingsnuclear have took 7 of the recent photographs and have annotated them showing what certain things on the plant site are such as the broken pipes, holes etc. It's good for reference.

With regards to the trenches/tunnel.........



Reactor 2: It is thought radioactive steam is flowing from the core into the reactor housing and is leaking through cracks in the water-filled suppression chamber beneath the reactor. Radioactive water in a tunnel underneath the reactor and the turbine building (see diagram below) is preventing workers from gaining access. This tunnel emerges at the front of the building as a trench - just 55 metres from the sea.

BBC

This is a Japanese article translated by the owner of this blog....

The turbine buildings are designated as the "Radiation Control Zone" where the strict control on radiation is required. However, the ducts and tunnels are outside the Zone. The pipes for pumping sea water to the heat exchangers go through these ducts/tunnels. The contaminated water is already up to 1 meter from the top of the ducts, and it is considered that the ducts/tunnels are filled with the contaminated water to capacity.

Blog

They have said that the water level of the trenches/tunnel has not risen so it is possible that the level of this water is at the same level as the sea and is being topped up by broken pipes supplying the sea water. Also it looks like on the BBC image that this trench/tunnel runs underneath everything, right back to the reactor maybe. What TheRedneck said about the tides playing a part would make sense.

If these tunnels are made of concrete then it's possible that they have cracked, like the concrete on the ground, also at their weakest points such as corners or where pipes and ducts enter. If this has happened it would also add to the radiation of the ground water.

Apparently the reason we can't find any plans to the plant on the internet is because of a risk of terrorism.

I saw them say on NHK earlier that there will be high tides early Tuesday morning on some parts of the East and to stay away. I hope this plant isn't about to get hit again and wipe out what electrics it does have left.


edit on 4/4/11 by MissTiger because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 4 2011 @ 12:52 PM
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Originally posted by SFA437

Originally posted by 00nunya00
Bringing this forward because it kind of got lost in the debate on the last page, and I'd like to discuss if this really does indicate the pics are from different times, or if there are ideas why/how that big@ss pipe got moved? I don't see a door there in side-angle photos or anything they'd need to access, so I'd rule out it being moved by people with heavy equipment. So what's it all about?

I originally noticed this when trying to find confirmation of Redneck's proposed crack in the bedrock under #4 and #3, and thought maybe if it was laying over that crack, maybe it got moved by a widening/heightening, but I couldn't find good evidence of a crack (shadows, yes....crack? Too hard to tell for sure).


Originally posted by 00nunya00
I have reason to think these photographs were taken at radically different times, or right before and after another big aftershock:






Both are from the same 3-30 set in the same zip file. But clearly, something happened to that HUGE pipe laying next to #3. How could it have happened so quickly with no evidence of activity around it, ie: planning to move it?


Again- playing catch up but some quick off-the-cuff observations:

The small section of pipe at the bottom did not move- it is still in place.

There seems to be a piece of heavy machinery to the left edge in the second photo.

I haven't STUDIED the pics, just kind of glanced at them so this isn't definitive but food for thought and debate


HI Rbrtj here.. I have been wondering if the thin strips of steel that all seem to be the same legnth and diameter and look to be more distorted are the "rods" discussed earlier, somebody said to watch them and to see if the begin to curl up do to be hot and cooling or heating up?
Can somebody address this for us.?? Thank you



posted on Apr, 4 2011 @ 12:52 PM
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reply to post by KaiserSoze
 


I've upgraded my rating to 8. It won't stop there. This is still the middle of this and already it is worse than chernobyl and can get much worse. If tokyo has to be evacuated it is a 9, so when was the last time that many people were evacuated out of such a small space (or the whole of japan, over 100 million people!).

No they are not fixing their rating system they are working hard to lie to us and downplay what is really going on. It is unbelievable how RETARDED their fixes have been getting, diapers and concrete! I mean cmon that is so bloody weak! People are seriously buying this crap? I used to make this ball valve grease I know what it can do, there was a complex set of chemistry involved in their products but I even remember how to make them, I COULD MAKE THE BLOODY STUFF that would seal that crack, I still remember how it was made and what is required to make it work in such a wide gap. You need stuff that is strong. Diapers are not all that compatible with concrete that is pure lunacy, I've poured concrete before in my various careers and diapers is the worst possible aggregate one could ever use. They may as well try using foam pool noodles they might work better. This is just retarded on so many levels, who are these crackheads that run government?



posted on Apr, 4 2011 @ 12:57 PM
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reply to post by rbrtj
 


no, those are thin strips of metal. You have your beams and girders, cross beams, comprising the main structural component of the reactor containment building, and those thin strips of metal are cross bracing to better support the sheet paneling used as walls for it to enclose it. That's why there are so many of them, blown all over the place, and why they are so mangled. If those were rods you would see them contorting over time all on their own, those are just lying there I've been checking.
edit on 4-4-2011 by TheLastStand because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 4 2011 @ 01:01 PM
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Originally posted by iWokeUp
Have you guys seen this yet? I bet they will just blame all the cr*p thats in the air on Japan.....It all just gets worse day by day !

Nato bombs Libyan nuclear reactor




Redneck and others who work in the industry. Can you tell me what would happen if a "pool type" reactor had its cooling, building and operational staff disabled by a couple of cruise missiles.

Could there be radioactive releases in to the environment?

The US army obviously don't think there will be any danger beyond the immediate locale.



posted on Apr, 4 2011 @ 01:04 PM
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reply to post by Altair11

A slip fit in a nuclear plant, regardless of the system involved, doesn't make sense when considered with the regulations of the NRC. Here, every system, be it fire protection (sprinklers), potable water, main steam lines, restroom plumbing, ductwork, etc., is designed to withstand a seismic event of pre-determined proportions (I actually was a designer in the pipe-support section). That would most certainly apply to a vent line that was intended to be used as radioactive contamination ducting!

Not to mention, it appears that pipe (the section running side-to-side) is being used as auxiliary
support for more cables. Why would anyone use a slip-joint, made-to-fail pipe for cable support?

I dunno, maybe the standards are a lot lower in Japan.

I also looked at the pictures again. That long box running alongside the pipe in the first pic is a cable tray, definitely. The rods that seem to be exposed and are on occasion sticking out are conduit, probably 2 - 2 1/2". And if you look closely at where that cable tray runs underneath the pipe toward the top of the pics, you can see damage in the first that has been repaired in the second.

TheRedneck



posted on Apr, 4 2011 @ 01:07 PM
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reply to post by TheLastStand
 


Alright then thanks for your diligence



posted on Apr, 4 2011 @ 01:09 PM
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reply to post by TheRedneck
 


A slip fit just doesn't make sense in that application, in my opinion. I would like to think those should be welded or permanently affixed to ensure their airtight. One would think they would build that system airtight considering it's designed to vent air as well as radioactive gasses.



posted on Apr, 4 2011 @ 01:11 PM
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reply to post by Procharmo

Oh, great...

Let's just say it's no big deal for Libya... not because there won't be releases, but because there probably already are. I though the BWR design was bad until I saw this.

I really wanna know... are there any of these plants outside the US that are designed to not spew radiation into the surrounding area? Any? Just one, maybe?

TheRedneck



posted on Apr, 4 2011 @ 01:23 PM
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Originally posted by Nucleardoom
reply to post by TheRedneck
 


A slip fit just doesn't make sense in that application, in my opinion. I would like to think those should be welded or permanently affixed to ensure their airtight. One would think they would build that system airtight considering it's designed to vent air as well as radioactive gasses.
From the photos, it would appear that the joints are flanged and the flanges are most likely welded to the pipe. With the lengths of pipe involved, there have to be expansion joints engineered into the design. The expansion joints would most likely be an oversized sleeve with seals or packing at both ends to prevent leaks, but still allow for movement of the pipe inside it. Where the expansion joints are installed, the actual pipe is cut short so that the ends of the lengths have a gap long enough to allow for the total expansion when the system is at rated temperature.

ETA: The piping would tend to come apart at the expansion joints when an event such as this accident occurred.
edit on 4-4-2011 by butcherguy because: to add.



posted on Apr, 4 2011 @ 01:24 PM
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reply to post by TheRedneck
 


Well if they are that leaky and deserve to blown up, why bother about the leakage from the 4 reactors in Japan?

Is it because of the country/state that the supposed leaked contamination is coming from . Once it's diluted around the world it must all add up. 4 leaks has to be better than a potential 5.

Other wise we could nuke every reactor that is not in a "Western" friendly country and not worry about it!

edit on 4-4-2011 by Procharmo because: spelling , grammar



posted on Apr, 4 2011 @ 01:24 PM
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Originally posted by TheLastStand
reply to post by Destinyone
 


That's entirely what I'm getting at --- chakotay suggested that we bend over and just do our "friends" bidding. But I have a problem with this because these japanese were fools. They turned down our help but expect us to live with the consequences of their bad, selfish, prideful decision and expect to cash in their bonds while we get to inhale and drink their nuclear garbage. I don't think so. I'm not going to be slave to any society that is bringing down my way of life that is not how this works, if this is how globalism works then count me out. These people are nice people but their government is a totally irresponsible threat. Treat them accordingly. Save the people from their evil government.



Countries don't have friends, they have interests. It is our interest to see the nuclear issue resolved quickly and also to lend help and support to see Japan and their economy out of this crisis. But no country is going to fall on it's sword for another particularly when the situation might have dire consequences for their own. In addition this situation has been been worsened but what has clearly been poor planning, managment, decisionmaking, execution, leadership and even more frustrating, secrecy and an appearance of manipulating facts.

If any individual feels a strong, personal friendship or connection to Japan their are dozens of ways to show it. But don't demand others do the same as you, each will find their own comforable level of committment. Using guilt as a means of provoking the response YOU want is just a shameless manipulation of peoples emotions.



posted on Apr, 4 2011 @ 01:32 PM
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Originally posted by mrbillshow

Originally posted by TheLastStand
reply to post by Destinyone
 


That's entirely what I'm getting at --- chakotay suggested that we bend over and just do our "friends" bidding. But I have a problem with this because these japanese were fools. They turned down our help but expect us to live with the consequences of their bad, selfish, prideful decision and expect to cash in their bonds while we get to inhale and drink their nuclear garbage. I don't think so. I'm not going to be slave to any society that is bringing down my way of life that is not how this works, if this is how globalism works then count me out. These people are nice people but their government is a totally irresponsible threat. Treat them accordingly. Save the people from their evil government.



Countries don't have friends, they have interests.[bold] It is our interest to see the nuclear issue resolved quickly and also to lend help and support to see Japan and their economy out of this crisis. [/bold] But no country is going to fall on it's sword for another particularly when the situation might have dire consequences for their own. In addition this situation has been been worsened but what has clearly been poor planning, managment, decisionmaking, execution, leadership and even more frustrating, secrecy and an appearance of manipulating facts.

If any individual feels a strong, personal friendship or connection to Japan their are dozens of ways to show it. But don't demand others do the same as you, each will find their own comforable level of committment. Using guilt as a means of provoking the response YOU want is just a shameless manipulation of peoples emotions.


The only driver to assist in Fukishima is financial. Not humanitarian or global health. Other wise how could you have just bombed Libya's nuclear reactor!



posted on Apr, 4 2011 @ 01:33 PM
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I downloaded the hi res pictures from both series last night and noticed something as I was drifting off in my chair. I'm on my iPhone at present so I can't upload photos, but if someone could do so, you'll see what I'm about to describe.

Take a look at the one with the water spewing from the crack behind the barred door. If you zoom in, even just a little bit, you will see a multitude of white specks. I believe those to be the result of energetic particles striking the mechanism of the camera that gathers the light. Similar to the noise you see in SOHO images of the sun.

I am wondering if there is any way we can get an estimate of the level of contamination by countin those particle strikes.



posted on Apr, 4 2011 @ 01:38 PM
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reply to post by butcherguy

There are engineered expansion joints that are used in such cases. They fit between the flanges and allow an inch or two maximum movement. You really can't even see the things unless you are up close looking at them.

This pipe doesn't appear to be flanged... it appears to have formed ends, which would then be welded together. If there are any expansion joints, they would be noticeable as having a set of flanges in the middle of a pipe that otherwise had none. It's sort of like PVC plumbing pipe... the pipe fits exactly into the fitting. Now just think about how well any plumbing arrangement would work, even a drain, if you didn't apply the glue.

TheRedneck



posted on Apr, 4 2011 @ 01:38 PM
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Just found this clip, it's in Japanese. I think it shows the arrival of MOX fuel at reactor 3 last year.

You can get a good look inside the actual reactor 3 as well.



www.youtube.com...

A translation would be handy.....



posted on Apr, 4 2011 @ 01:39 PM
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reply to post by Procharmo
 


Ahem...I didn't "bomb" anyone's nuclear reactor. I have no intention of doing so. That being said, it might come down to using explosives at some point in Japan, in order to separate fuel rods. We just don't know.

Des



posted on Apr, 4 2011 @ 01:41 PM
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reply to post by Procharmo

That's not what I was saying, at all.

I am simply saying that anyone who thinks it is a good idea to make a nuclear reactor without any containment other than a pool of water is just asking for trouble in the first place. No, we don't need to be breathing too heavy around that thing!

I am also saying if your neighbor is busily pouring gasoline on a raging fire, he doesn't have much to say if you drive by and the wind from your car blows the fire the wrong way...

TheRedneck



posted on Apr, 4 2011 @ 01:54 PM
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reply to post by TheRedneck
 
I was looking at the second photo, on the relatively undamaged pipe. Trace the pipe from the 90 degree ell where it is torn off on the right end, go to the left side of the pic, about mid-way on the horizontal run, you will see what appears to be a flange. I am not talking about the clamps used to anchor the pipe in place on the metal trestle under it, they are evenly spaced. Then the piping appears to go down towards the ground on a 45 degree angle. after the 45, you will see a swelled area in the pipe. I would think that we are seeing expansion joints at the points that look like flanges or the oversized areas. I have worked with double-walled vents that are flanged on the inside joints and sealed with high temp caulk, and the outer joints are covered with a band of metal (no seal), the expansion joints, when used, are hidden inside. They are slip fit with high temp rope seals.

I will stop going down this path now, as I don't think it will lead us anywhere. At least it won't for now.

Who knows what tomorrow will bring? More explosions? I hope not.



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