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Japan declares 'nuclear emergency' after quake

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posted on Apr, 3 2011 @ 07:32 PM
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Originally posted by AlphaExray
Years ago, back when the plans were being drawn for the Mark 1 reactor, there was an obsession in the scientific community to master the uses for this great new marvel. Lots of mistakes were made, and the scientist who played with these designs were very brazen in their experimentation. The most daring experiements were in the application of atomic power in aircraft and ultimately spacecraft.

One of the nicest designs was proposed by an American, who eventually died in obscurity. Most of his research is gone, and I know that there were attempts to undersand his work after his death without much success. What originated as yet another atomic ram engine design came a completely radical concept for a decay reactor.


Is this him? I would like to know more about his work. I have a friend who worked with Oppenheimer too. He was there for the first test. Interesting. Thanks for the lead! Going to go do some reading.



Chapter Four: Johnny Builds bombs and Johnny Builds Brains

If you asked then thousand people to name the most influential thinker of the twentieth century, it is likely that not one of them would nominate John von Neumann. Few would even recognize his name. Despite his obscurity outside the communities of mathematicians and computer theorists, hit thoughts had an incalculable impact on human destiny. He died in 1957, but the fate of the human race still depends on how we and out descendants decide to use the technologies von Neumann's extraordinary mind made possible.

At the end of his life he was an American, and a power behind the scenes of American scientific policy and foreign policy. But that was only the last of several equally distinguished identities in different countries and fields of thought. Janos Neumann, known as "Jansci," was a prodigious young chemical engineer turned mathematician and logician in Hungary in the early 1920s. Johann von Neumann was one of the elite quantum physics revolutionaries in Gottingen, Germany, in the late twenties. And from 1933 until his death, he was John von Neumann of Princeton, New Jersey; Los Alamos, New Mexico; and Washington, D.C., known to professors and Presidents as "Johnny."


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posted on Apr, 3 2011 @ 07:38 PM
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More on those so-called 'sheets' to cover the reactors:



''This step is essentially lip service to give the public a sense of ease by hiding the image of the decrepit nuclear plant,'' the source said.


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Exactly. They want to try and hide the destroyed reactors from public view.




posted on Apr, 3 2011 @ 07:40 PM
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Originally posted by mendel101

Originally posted by qmantoo
This is the page with all the webcam images on it - updated hourly. Obviously this is not much use if there is nothing going on there. Still... it shows interesting stuff going on.

Page of webcam photos (look at the black one from 19:00 2nd Apr 2011)
pointscope01.jp/cgi-local/f1np/f1np1/imageview.cgi?mode=main_b

In the 2nd April 2011 at 19:00 one we can see a white heat spot.


Hi qmantoo-

Yes I noticed there was a bright spot last night. However, it's far away from the reactors and only shows up once, in contrast to the much dimmer night spot that shows up at the same place almost every night from March 20 onwards. If you sum up all 19:00 night images (ImageJ) some other incidental spots show up:



If you overlay this onto a daytime shot:



You see that last nights spots are somewhere near the docks, perhaps they are head lights? Other incidental spots are at sea, in the air, among the trees. Not sure if these could be just "noise".

The Mendel


nice work , that day time overlay picture looks very much like a melting pool in a critical state ( fissioning)

I think some of the white dots are high energy gamma rays ( like cosmic rays ) hitting the camera detector ( if it's ccd then those are exactly what cosmic ray charge-overs look like ( oversaturations of the ccd at that pixel), but 20110402 looks more like an artificial (though normal) light source as does 20110311 ( a boat perhaps?)


Which brings me to a point made by Alphaexray these 'open air' criticality events ( melt downs ) are producing insanely high levels of neutron bombardment for everything in and around the plant , and while Tepco fights a regard action to keep fire or another particalization event ( explosion)

This creeping neutron cascade is making everything radioactive and is certainly starting to transmute objects and produce secondary and tertiary , etc, etc reactions for example

Neutron bombardment of mercury 198 produces (radioactive ) gold AND ONE POSITRON ,

Mercury 198 + 6.8MeV gamma ray \to 1 neutron + Mercury 197 (half-life 2.7 days \to Gold 197 + 1 positron), admittedly only a small portion of mercury can be transmuted , but how much mercury is in stuff around the plant that has been getting wave after wave of neutron radiation ? And how many other materials and cascade effects are happening and are we or have hit a choke point wherein the cascade effect keeps thing radioactive a lot longer than simple particulate distribution, and worse, begins to 'flow' from areas of higher concentration to lower( spreading radiation like a growing bruise on fruit)?

Positron/electron annihilation gives off a known amount of energy it sure would be nice if someone from the university of Tokyo got something up there to start taking high energy readings off of things around the plant ( can be done from very far away)

Someone had a question about how the 'ceramic' rods hold up , do they become powder again ? the short answer is yes , under concussive force ( units #1, #3 and #4 ) they react much like concrete or china in fact I think the mythbusters where they blow up the cement truck is highly appropriate to this imagery :




One of the big problems with salt in the reactors (besides uralyl chloride)is the molten NA building up around the fissionable material and acting like a thermal blanket increasing the likely hood of fission, I think it's a desperate maneuver with adding water , but so far the thermal transport ( getting rid of the heat ) has offset the disadvantages of extra heat....

The down side is once IF they stop that leak how are they going to cool the water?



posted on Apr, 3 2011 @ 07:45 PM
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Originally posted by imlite

Originally posted by crazydaisy
reply to post by Aponi
 


Sheeting? you have got to be kidding me - lightweight sheeting
such as they put on the outside of houses?

I vote for the duct tape if thats the case. Sounds like they
are getting desperate and grasping at straws.


I read a few days ago that if they went ahead with this plan it would be heavy duty plastic sheeting. It was to contain any radioactive particles in the reactor buildings from blowing out over the rest of the site.

The real problem for open reactor buildings is the weather. What if it rains heavily, they get a storm over the site (or even a typhoon), or it gets very gusty? Mist and fog may be able to pick up particles. Also, what if there is another earthquake that releases more particles through causing parts of the damaged building to collapse

The idea was halted because of the difficulty of putting up a frame to hold the sheeting and which was strong enough to survive any weather conditions or further structural collapse when the radioactivity levels were so high at the reactors.

For them to bring out this idea again shows they are desperate.

Even nylon re-enforced plastic only lasts outside about a week before it is pretty torn up from wind, it would have to be something a bit more durable like canvas , desperate is the key word , why not just start pumping expansion foam everywhere with some garden hoses in it to keep it cool.



posted on Apr, 3 2011 @ 07:55 PM
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Originally posted by Silverlok
...

One of the big problems with salt in the reactors (besides uralyl chloride)is the molten NA building up around the fissionable material and acting like a thermal blanket increasing the likely hood of fission, I think it's a desperate maneuver with adding water , but so far the thermal transport ( getting rid of the heat ) has offset the disadvantages of extra heat....

The down side is once IF they stop that leak how are they going to cool the water?


I don't think there is any molten sodium in the reactor. There is sodium chloride and maybe sodium hydroxide but pure sodium metal would not exist for very long, especially in the presence of water.



posted on Apr, 3 2011 @ 07:59 PM
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reply to post by SDoradus
 


I will have to dig for the link but a Swedish group actually warned Tepco about sodium accumulation and it's attendant thermal problems , and the NA would almost certainly be bonded to something but the high temperature of the rods is suppose to act like a sodium accumulator.


on a slightly different subject here is a greenpeace video of them driving around near fukushima and getting a max out reading some 30km from the plant
edit on 3-4-2011 by Silverlok because: more stuff

edit on 3-4-2011 by Silverlok because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 3 2011 @ 08:05 PM
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Originally posted by TriForce
Some new photos, at least they claim they are.


Latest Satellite Imagery From Fukushima Tells Sobering Tale


Photos


Did anyone happen to grab those photos because they no longer show up and now the site is timing out, oops they must just be getting serious traffic :-)
edit on 3-4-2011 by Silverlok because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 3 2011 @ 08:23 PM
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Originally posted by SDoradus

Originally posted by Silverlok
...

One of the big problems with salt in the reactors (besides uralyl chloride)is the molten NA building up around the fissionable material and acting like a thermal blanket increasing the likely hood of fission, I think it's a desperate maneuver with adding water , but so far the thermal transport ( getting rid of the heat ) has offset the disadvantages of extra heat....

The down side is once IF they stop that leak how are they going to cool the water?


I don't think there is any molten sodium in the reactor. There is sodium chloride and maybe sodium hydroxide but pure sodium metal would not exist for very long, especially in the presence of water.

Yes. Star on your post sodium is crazy reactive with water. It is often kept in a bath of kerosene for storage in labs so that it doesn't react with water vapor in the air. Sodium and water, the results are truly explosive. Mythbusters did an episode with it once.



posted on Apr, 3 2011 @ 08:26 PM
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Is anyone seeing what I am seeing?

Original source




posted on Apr, 3 2011 @ 08:33 PM
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reply to post by OuttaHere
 


What are you seeing?

Or are you trying to get an objective opinion?



posted on Apr, 3 2011 @ 08:40 PM
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reply to post by onequestion
 



Originally posted by onequestion
reply to post by OuttaHere
 


What are you seeing?

Or are you trying to get an objective opinion?


I find the circular structure laying sideways in reactor building #3 (circled in red) to be mighty curious. Could it be that the top of the reactor vessel is laying, open, on its side?



posted on Apr, 3 2011 @ 08:43 PM
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reply to post by OuttaHere
 


It looks like no 3 reactor, the one that exploded 1 km in the air on 3-14-11, lying almost sideways with no lid.

That seems to confirm a lot of things about #3 IMO.



posted on Apr, 3 2011 @ 08:44 PM
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reply to post by 1SawSomeThings
 



Originally posted by 1SawSomeThings
reply to post by OuttaHere
 


It looks like no 3 reactor, the one that exploded 1 km in the air on 3-14-11, lying almost sideways with no lid.

That seems to confirm a lot of things about #3 IMO.


... But it's still no more serious that Three Mile Island. Right?

Give me a break.



posted on Apr, 3 2011 @ 08:45 PM
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reply to post by OuttaHere
 


Went and looked at the original source. Gulp.

#3 is the Mox fuel reactor.

Will stand by for our better informed viewers.



ETA: Sorry normally I would say great find, but this is catastrophic. Good eyes.
edit on 3-4-2011 by DancedWithWolves because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 3 2011 @ 08:48 PM
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reply to post by OuttaHere
 


If it is what it appears to be ( the containment vessel on it's side) then it explains the odd pattern of debris on the turbine roof , and lends credence to the idea that the primary and secondary caps made those holes (hell they may have even slid across the roof )



posted on Apr, 3 2011 @ 08:48 PM
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Can someone look at to scale measurements and tell us the sizes of what were looking at in the picture? Then compare the measurements to the known dimensions of the building?



posted on Apr, 3 2011 @ 08:51 PM
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reply to post by leisas4
 


This tells me the ocean current that dog was on didn't go far and maybe does go in circles like they say.

Good post too, we need it.

edit on 3-4-2011 by rbrtj because: goofed up



posted on Apr, 3 2011 @ 08:51 PM
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Originally posted by DancedWithWolves
reply to post by OuttaHere
 


Went and looked at the original source. Gulp.

#3 is the Mox fuel reactor.

Will stand by for our better informed viewers.



ETA: Sorry normally I would say great find, but this is catastrophic. Good eyes.
edit on 3-4-2011 by DancedWithWolves because: (no reason given)


That round thing in the photo has to be the reactor itself, as there is not much left of reactor 3 building.



posted on Apr, 3 2011 @ 09:00 PM
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Tokyo Electric Sawdust Solution Fails to Stop Radiation Leak

Tokyo Electric Power Co.’s attempt to clog a cracked pit with a mixture of sawdust, newspaper and plastic failed to stop radioactive water leaking into the sea from its crippled nuclear plant.

Not good.

And the scariest statement yet..

A Tepco executive said yesterday he isn’t optimistic about the prospect of containing damage at the Fukushima Dai-Ichi nuclear power plant’s No. 3 reactor.

“I don’t know if we can ever enter the No. 3 reactor building again,” Hikaru Kuroda, the company’s chief of nuclear facility management, said at a press conference.

Basically almost saying it's over.



posted on Apr, 3 2011 @ 09:02 PM
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Here is a blow up of that reactor photo:



Sure looks like a massive gaping hole in the side of reactor 3, doesn't it?!



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