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Japan declares 'nuclear emergency' after quake

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posted on Mar, 31 2011 @ 12:58 PM
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TEPCO workers not warned of radiation risk


The company had detected 200 millisieverts per hour of radiation leaking from the first basement of the turbine building of the No. 1 reactor on March 18, six days before the accident.

TEPCO acknowledged on Saturday it had been aware that the pool of water in question at the No. 3 reactor's turbine building could contain a high concentration of radioactive materials.

The information about measurement findings at the No. 1 reactor's turbine building, however, was not conveyed to the workers before they started the task of laying cables Thursday morning, the company said.

If the workers had been told of the possibility that a pool of water in the building contained high concentrations of radiation, their radiation exposure probably would have been averted, analysts said.


www.yomiuri.co.jp...

Can we call up a Global Hawk to take out TEPCO's headquarters?
WHY are they still in charge of this?




posted on Mar, 31 2011 @ 12:58 PM
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reply to post by zorgon
 



Here's the configuration Fukushima 4 would have been in at the time of the earthquake:

Fukushima Reactor Hall Fueling

Now consider what you are seeing in the overhead shots...



posted on Mar, 31 2011 @ 12:59 PM
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Last nights news about to repeat on NHK top of the hour

www3.nhk.or.jp...



posted on Mar, 31 2011 @ 01:00 PM
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reply to post by 00nunya00
 


no test kit needed, your plants stalks will turn red when your soil is sucked dry of potassium.



posted on Mar, 31 2011 @ 01:03 PM
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A quick thank you to all getting information to this thread and those that respond to my queries. I don't respond to each one to keep the bric-a-brac to minimum (like this post but didn't want anyone to think I was being rude...
).



posted on Mar, 31 2011 @ 01:03 PM
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Pardon me if someone's already mentioned this...I just finished a quick scan and study of posts overnight and can't be sure I've absorbed everything.

Looking at the hi-res photos I had a couple of thoughts, the primary one being a law of physics:

"equal and opposite"

When the top blew off the plants, there was a similar force exerted on the concrete floor and bedrock. I'll bet dollars to donuts that the floor was cracked and the bedrock, too: this is the source of the leak contaminating the ocean they can't find. They need a geologist there asap to look at the bedrock via seismology and compare the readings to what was known before. I'm certain there must be pretty thorough records on what the bedrock looked like when they built the plants in the first place.

The other thought was what is happening to those buildings: they are disintegrating. It looks like they are slowly being charred through heat and something else...I'm not sure how that much radiation over that long a period effects materials, but it sure seems like disintegration is what is occurring.



posted on Mar, 31 2011 @ 01:04 PM
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reply to post by brocktoon


Thanks for that image...
Puts it into perspective.



posted on Mar, 31 2011 @ 01:05 PM
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Radiation monitors not given to each worker


NHK has learned that Tokyo Electric Power Company, or TEPCO, has not provided every worker at the damaged Fukushima nuclear plant with radiation monitors, breaking government rules.

High levels of contamination have been detected at the Daiichi power complex following a series of hydrogen explosions that have scattered radioactive substances.

TEPCO says the quake destroyed many radiation monitors, so in some work groups only leaders have them, leaving others struggling to manage exposure.

The government requires companies to provide each individual worker with a radiation monitor when working under such conditions.

One worker who helped restore electricity to the plant, says each man must have been exposed to different levels of radiation, and that he has no idea how much contamination he was exposed to.

TEPCO says that those without monitors are assigned to low-radiation work, and that safety measures are in place.

The health ministry says exposure to large amounts of radiation is always a possibility during a nuclear power plant accident. It adds if the claims are true it is a serious problem, and that it plans to investigate the company's safety management.

Thursday, March 31, 2011 19:37 +0900 (JST)


www3.nhk.or.jp...



posted on Mar, 31 2011 @ 01:05 PM
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reply to post by zorgon
 


"Can we call up a Global Hawk to take out TEPCO's headquarters? WHY are they still in charge of this?"

They know the plant the best but should not be in charge, making critical decisions nor the gatekeeper of information. The JapGuv should have remedied this weeks ago.



posted on Mar, 31 2011 @ 01:10 PM
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reply to post by apacheman
 


An explosion is kind of like a fluid flow. It will find the path of least resistance.

A good analogy is a firearm. Yes the breechface takes a bit of a beating when a cartridge is fired- but the reason there is no serious damage is because there is an outlet for the pressure. The xplosions at Fukushima were not "contained" like a pipe bomb but had a direction in which to direct the force. See #3 explosion, directed upwards and #1 & #4 radial blasts.

I'm sure the underlying foundation took a beating and is perhaps cracked but as for the chance for destruction on any kind of scale to be a concern is (I hate using this word considering....) minimal.



posted on Mar, 31 2011 @ 01:10 PM
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reply to post by TheLastStand
 


Yeah, I've got some experience with plants----that red can also happen if your pH is too low for the potassium to be absorbed. However, I was talking test kits so I know I'm not overloading the soil with K and will end up burning the plants.
It was kind of just an aside comment, anyways.

What I really want to know is what "by a factor of 2 to 14" means.

ETA: nevermind, solved it. The potassium reduces cesium uptake by 2 to 14 TIMES more, not 2 to 14% more. So, twice as much if not 14 times as much as doing nothing.
edit on 31-3-2011 by 00nunya00 because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 31 2011 @ 01:11 PM
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reply to post by IDBIT

That link isn't showing any data prior to Mar 30. According to the notes:

  • Brief gaps in RadNet data represent instrument error.
  • Larger gaps (>1 day) occasionally appear when RadNet monitors are taken offline for servicing.
Source: www.epa.gov...

Since the reading is in CPM, there is nothing to compare it to.

TheRedneck



posted on Mar, 31 2011 @ 01:14 PM
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reply to post by brocktoon
 


I just want to point out a couple of things. First, it is important to see that there are two "cranes". A small refueling crane that runs on floor rails that is visible in the picture. There is a larger light green gantry that runs on the rails on the walls that are evident on the walls in the picture, is behind the photographer. We are looking at insertion of rods into the flooded top of the secondary containment that used to hold the yellow dome and under that, the reactor cover. The spent fuel pool is likely out of the picture behind the smaller crane that all those dudes are standing on. Sorry I can't get the image to post straight to the forum, maybe not enough posts...



edit on 31-3-2011 by brocktoon because: (no reason given)


Can you see it now?
edit on 31-3-2011 by brocktoon because: Image issues



posted on Mar, 31 2011 @ 01:15 PM
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Originally posted by apacheman
The other thought was what is happening to those buildings: they are disintegrating. It looks like they are slowly being charred through heat and something else...I'm not sure how that much radiation over that long a period effects materials, but it sure seems like disintegration is what is occurring.


Indeed. Can somebody knock together a few side-by-side shots for comparison?

I'm at work right now and don't think I should push my luck too far



posted on Mar, 31 2011 @ 01:16 PM
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Well this is a "genius" (sarcasm) decision and does not bode well for American plants' safety.

U.S. dropped nuclear rule meant to avert hydrogen explosions


The Nuclear Regulatory Commission has allowed reactors to phase out some equipment that eliminates explosive hydrogen, the gas that blew up the outer containments of three reactors at the Fukushima Daiichi in Japan.

The commission says it judged that at the American plants, the containments were strong enough that the equipment was not needed or other methods would do. After the Three Mile Island accident in 1979, many reactors were required to install “hydrogen recombiners,” which attach potentially explosive hydrogen atoms to oxygen to make water instead. At Three Mile Island, engineers learned that hot fuel could interact with steam to give off hydrogen. That caused the plant’s reactor to suffer a hydrogen explosion, although it did not seriously damage its containment. By contrast, the secondary containments at Fukushima Daiichi blew apart when hydrogen detonated inside them.

The change in commission policy was pointed out this week by a nuclear safety critic, Paul M. Blanch, who said that he had been involved in installing such equipment at Millstone 3, a nuclear reactor in Waterford, Conn. “Post-Three Mile Island, they were considered very important to safety,’’ Mr. Blanch said. He accused the Nuclear Regulatory Commission of having “gutted the rule’’ because the industry wanted to save money.


These are the reasons technology this dangerous should not be operated by for-profits. Money needs to go back into infrastructure, research and development; not lining the private sector's pockets. Sometimes EVERYTHING matters EXCEPT profits.




posted on Mar, 31 2011 @ 01:19 PM
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Originally posted by Nightfury
I've been trying to keep up with all of this since the beginning, and I also feel this thing is worse than they like to admit and that this is very far from over...

I would like to thank all of you keeping us informed and guys like Redneck and many others here who's been shedding some light and say it as it is...a BIG Thanks...

I hope and pray that this will get fixed somehow, but at this stage it's hard to see light at the end of this tunnel.

Keep up the great work!!!


I see light at the end of the tunnel...methinks it's a train coming...

Des
edit on 03/28/2011 by Destinyone because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 31 2011 @ 01:24 PM
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Originally posted by zorgon

Originally posted by mendel101
Night spot is gone tonight:
I pinpointed the exact spot it radiates from, the red dot in the zoom below:

Can anybody guess where exactly that is?


Found THIS


Ethereal Blue Flash


‘Ethereal Blue Flash’

Nuclear experts call such reactions “localized criticality.” They consist of a burst of heat, radiation and sometimes an “ethereal blue flash,” according to the U.S. Energy Department’s Los Alamos National Laboratory website. Twenty-one workers worldwide have been killed by criticality accidents since 1945, the site said.

The IAEA acknowledged “they don’t have clear signs that show such a phenomenon is happening,” Edano said.


www.businessweek.com...

Well it seems maybe YOU have that 'clear evidence' of blue flash
edit on 31-3-2011 by zorgon because: (no reason given)


That is a very interesting idea! Especially because the "blue light" seems to originate from Unit 1 or 2.



Green dot is source of night spot.

Upper panels are before the explosions (March 14th); lower panels after (March 29th). Because the webcam view is from the south/south east , mainly Unit 4 is in view, which can be seem crumbled after the blast. I was puzzled because the night spot seems to originate from the west of the reactors buildings, which is where the reactors are, not the SFPs.



edit on 31-3-2011 by mendel101 because: clarify



posted on Mar, 31 2011 @ 01:27 PM
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reply to post by TheLastStand
 


in fairness, it does seem to me it's building n.4
It can't be n.3 as there is still paint on the building
maybe n.1



posted on Mar, 31 2011 @ 01:33 PM
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reply to post by SFA437
 


Yes, I understand the path of least resistance, but remember that there were successive hammer blows over a couple of different spots, not a single event over one. The force would still be distributed through the ground and exxagerate any cracks. Remember that the area ws hit with a huge earthquake and hundreds of large aftershocks. The cumulative effect of shocks, explosions, and thousands of tons of water would mean that even a small crack would enlarge over time.

My theory fits with what is happening: high radiation from an unknown source leak. The reason they can't find the leak is because it is beneath the plants.

I say get a geologist there asap and at least rule it out. Hmmm...if I'm right you should be able to do a quick and dirty test by listening to the ground, the water flow should be audible if it is large enough. Dowsers would work, too: they locate running water by the electromagnetic fields they generate, if they find anything it would confirm it, as there shouldn't be running water under those plants, so far as I know.



posted on Mar, 31 2011 @ 01:34 PM
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Originally posted by DancedWithWolves
Well this is a "genius" (sarcasm) decision and does not bode well for American plants' safety.

U.S. dropped nuclear rule meant to avert hydrogen explosions


The Nuclear Regulatory Commission has allowed reactors to phase out some equipment that eliminates explosive hydrogen, the gas that blew up the outer containments of three reactors at the Fukushima Daiichi in Japan.

The commission says it judged that at the American plants, the containments were strong enough that the equipment was not needed or other methods would do. After the Three Mile Island accident in 1979, many reactors were required to install “hydrogen recombiners,” which attach potentially explosive hydrogen atoms to oxygen to make water instead. At Three Mile Island, engineers learned that hot fuel could interact with steam to give off hydrogen. That caused the plant’s reactor to suffer a hydrogen explosion, although it did not seriously damage its containment. By contrast, the secondary containments at Fukushima Daiichi blew apart when hydrogen detonated inside them.

The change in commission policy was pointed out this week by a nuclear safety critic, Paul M. Blanch, who said that he had been involved in installing such equipment at Millstone 3, a nuclear reactor in Waterford, Conn. “Post-Three Mile Island, they were considered very important to safety,’’ Mr. Blanch said. He accused the Nuclear Regulatory Commission of having “gutted the rule’’ because the industry wanted to save money.


These are the reasons technology this dangerous should not be operated by for-profits. Money needs to go back into infrastructure, research and development; not lining the private sector's pockets. Sometimes EVERYTHING matters EXCEPT profits.



So you'd rather have gubmint building (at taxpayer expense), operating and maintaining nuclear reactors? No thanks.

The problem isn't private industry, it's politicians and political parties that are bought off to reduce nuclear safety standards. Private industry always wants to reduce it's costs and deliver a return to it's investors and shareholders but that creates a conflict of interest that needs to be controlled and managed by outside entities whose only interest is safely delivering power to consumers.

As long as big money is allowed to influence standards and legislation we will always have this problem, as we have seen in Japan where the people have been completely let down by those whose mandate it is to protect them. I'm not letting Tepco or the nuclear industry off the hook, I'm saying they need to be properly managed with appropriate oversight and safety standards that are constantly checked and rechecked. The safety record of Fukichi and subsequent lack of action by the gubmint over the last twenty years alone should be enough to convince anyone the system is broken. Business will always have conflicts of interest, our elected officials can't if we are to expect them to their jobs responsibly.




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