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Japan declares 'nuclear emergency' after quake

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posted on Mar, 30 2011 @ 02:10 PM
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Originally posted by EnhancedInterrogator



Show me the spent fuel tank or the workers busily spraying water in that image. We can see the cement pump, but it looks deserted to me...and I see day light through the holes but nothing that looks like a fuel rod pool




posted on Mar, 30 2011 @ 02:10 PM
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I may be wrong...is this a new photo? Possible satellite photo ? I don't remember seeing this view of Fukushima before.

Des




posted on Mar, 30 2011 @ 02:15 PM
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Originally posted by Hellhound604
here is another newspaper article, that seems quite balanced, and has some nice new pictures of the damage


Nice one
Here we have some real hard facts

Japan pays 'suicide squads' fortunes to work in stricken nuclear plant as 'battle is lost for reactor two'
30th March 2011


* Four reactors at stricken plant to be decommissioned
* Subcontractors offered £760 a day - 20 times going rate - to brave radiation levels but some refuse
* One expert who designed reactor says race to save reactor two is 'lost'
* Radiation levels in sea water 3,335 times higher than normal
* Readings are almost three times worse than last week
* Unmanned drone photographs plant from the air amid health fear for pilots
* American robots dispatched to help containment efforts

Workers at the stricken Fukushima nuclear plant are being paid vast sums of money to brave high radiation levels - as experts warn that the race to save the facility has been lost.

Subcontractors are reportedly being offered up to 100,000 yen a day (£760) - 20 times the going rate - but some are still refusing the dangerous work.

Radiation levels are still extremely high at the plant, with water around the reactors emitting a highly dangerous 1,000 millisieverts per hour.

There are also fears that the plant is leaking more radiation as sea water around the plant was found to contain levels 3,335 higher than normal - almost three times higher than last week.

In a further development, an expert who helped design the plant said today that the race to prevent reactor number two melting down had been lost.

The plant's operators also said today that the four reactors that suffered explosions will be shut down for good once they are under control - and could be sealed in special material to keep radiation in.


www.dailymail.co.uk...



posted on Mar, 30 2011 @ 02:17 PM
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Regarding the smoke at the Fukushima Dai-ni plant ... even TEPCO's press-releases seem a little confused ...

  • Japanese press-release [here, entitled "For smoking in the Unit 1 turbine building 福島第二原子力発電所 (update)"] (and Google-Translated to Engrish here), this was at Unit #1 at the Fukushima Dai-ni plant.
  • English press-release [here], says (I believe mistakenly), this was at Unit #1 at the Fukushima Dai-ichi plant.

I suspect they cut-and-pasted the text into a file with the wrong title/header. They seem to be getting their English releases as quickly as the Japanese versions now, but I guess the may be rushing it a little bit.



posted on Mar, 30 2011 @ 02:18 PM
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reply to post by Destinyone
 


Judging from that, no 1 fuel pool is toast, no 3 is toast, if meltdown is figured from no 2 that is toast. This is starting to feel like the point of no return, a chain-reaction state where they have a confirmed meltdown, possibly another 2, probably at least another 1. If they think no 2 is toast then what is with the plutonium? This leads me down the path that no 2 and no 3 are in full meltdown status. The plutonium is from no 3! We are now waiting for at least two steam explosions once the two cores melt down to the water table or into a chamber designed to contain the corium. The spent fuel pools will follow the cores into the underground chambers and thus undermine the engineering completely put behind them. The structure underneath wasn't designed for core + spent fuel, it was designed for just the core. LMAO! So we have two very epically huge problems in my books and I'm willing to guess it won't take much longer of this for redneck to suggest so as well.
edit on 30-3-2011 by TheLastStand because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 30 2011 @ 02:21 PM
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Nice drawing of the reactor here



Looks abandoned...



Time line...



Source: www.dailymail.co.uk...
edit on 30-3-2011 by zorgon because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 30 2011 @ 02:21 PM
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Originally posted by zorgon

Originally posted by EnhancedInterrogator


Show me the spent fuel tank or the workers busily spraying water in that image. We can see the cement pump, but it looks deserted to me...and I see day light through the holes but nothing that looks like a fuel rod pool


Eh, actually, ... that little truck on the left side (which is huge actually) with the long red pipe coming out of it appears to be there to pump water into the top of the building - presumably hoping to hit what's left of the spent-fuel pond inside what's left of the building.

The scale of those buildings is now much more clear to me, comparing it to that (concrete-pumper?) truck. These buildings are way bigger that I had the impression of before.


PS: Sorry, I think I missed your point, now that I went back and read it again. Yes, nobody in sight, but I believe they are not pumping 24x7 either - they keep saying they are, then they stop, then they start again.

edit on 2011-3-30 by EnhancedInterrogator because: Added post-script.



posted on Mar, 30 2011 @ 02:27 PM
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reply to post by EnhancedInterrogator
 


so where's the water then? There's a piece of hose that usually comes off those pump trucks on the end of the assembly that is about 10 feet long, we would still be-able to see at that angle if the pump truck was pumping anything.



posted on Mar, 30 2011 @ 02:27 PM
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Originally posted by EnhancedInterrogator
PS: Sorry, I think I missed your point, now that I went back and read it again. Yes, nobody in sight, but I believe they are not pumping 24x7 either -


They showed that pump in action ONE DAY and since then use the same photo over and over when they say they are still pumping... it has to be BS because they keep telling us on the other hand that there is no place for the water to go... then they tell us ocean radiation levels are at 3,335 which is THREE TIMES higher than last week

So they tell us the water is not going into the ocean because they used sand bags on the trenches... so where is that radiation in the ocean coming from?

Maybe leaking out from UNDER the plant with the tides?
edit on 30-3-2011 by zorgon because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 30 2011 @ 02:28 PM
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reply to post by zorgon
 


It looks like bent fuel rods scattered around in the foreground. How long are fuel rods? Can someone measure these according to the pipe diameter or other reference point in the foreground? Looks like we don’t have to worry about rods at this reactor…they’re spaced enough that they won’t “overheat” each other….just push them around with the dozer tanks they brought in!



posted on Mar, 30 2011 @ 02:29 PM
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reply to post by zorgon
 


that pump truck is there, but it is definitely not pumping anything. Looks abandoned to me.



posted on Mar, 30 2011 @ 02:32 PM
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reply to post by BKGump
 


nah I'm skeptical of this one. I would expect to see one of those rods resting against something and depicting deformation from merely doing that -- we would need a few more photos and figure out spots to watch and see if they actually are. I would expect a rod to slump over a solid object much like a noodle if it isn't in the water being cooled.



posted on Mar, 30 2011 @ 02:32 PM
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Originally posted by BKGump
reply to post by zorgon
 


It looks like bent fuel rods scattered around in the foreground. How long are fuel rods? Can someone measure these according to the pipe diameter or other reference point in the foreground? Looks like we don’t have to worry about rods at this reactor…they’re spaced enough that they won’t “overheat” each other….just push them around with the dozer tanks they brought in!


Posted that before


Overall assembly length, m 4.470
Cross section, cm 13.9 x 13.9
Fuel rod length, m 4.064
Active fuel height, m 3.759
Fuel rod outer diameter, cm 1.252
Fuel rod array 8 x 8
Fuel rods per assembly 63
Assembly total weight, kg 319.9


www.nucleartourist.com...



posted on Mar, 30 2011 @ 02:35 PM
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Originally posted by TheLastStand
nah I'm skeptical of this one. I would expect to see one of those rods resting against something and depicting deformation from merely doing that -- we would need a few more photos and figure out spots to watch and see if they actually are. I would expect a rod to slump over a solid object much like a noodle if it isn't in the water being cooled.


From #3








posted on Mar, 30 2011 @ 02:38 PM
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Originally posted by Destinyone
I may be wrong...is this a new photo? Possible satellite photo ? I don't remember seeing this view of Fukushima before.


No it's older. I asked about the hole in the roof of the turbine building many pages back



I think the explanation was something big from the explosion went through the roof



posted on Mar, 30 2011 @ 02:38 PM
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As it turns out once you look at teh thermal numbers spraying water on the outside of a NORMAL reactor secondary containment is like trying to cool the family barbecue by spitting on it and trying to cool a Primary containment vessel by pouring water on the Outside of it is like trying to pour water over it. Unless you can get water circulating around and inside the core it's a waste of time (you never put out the coal with out getting water to them )....
so the ONLY REASON for the water spraying/ dumping ab initio is to try and keep the waste pools either cooled down or filled ( they MUST be leaking by now)

the nasty bit of logic that follows that is that ther is only ONE waste pool left intact to worry about cooling.
edit on 30-3-2011 by Silverlok because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 30 2011 @ 02:44 PM
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reply to post by zorgon
 


There's one rod in that last photo that I am looking at that appears to be doing that sort of thing. I would love to see a new photo of it... None of those rods should be straight anymore they should be displaying signs of deformation, twisting and bending -- so if all those 4 meter long straight things that look rather skinny are rods, a newer photo will confirm this, the more they lose the battle the more we will see these things twisting around.



posted on Mar, 30 2011 @ 02:47 PM
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I don't know how to put in my own pictures yet, but I marked that hole in the roof of the turbine-building, and was wondering if that object that was circled in the photo of the one explosion that was shown a couple of pages back, made that hole when it fell back to the ground.


reply to post by zorgon
 



posted on Mar, 30 2011 @ 02:56 PM
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I have been following the forums over at U.C Berkeley dept. of nuke engineering .
they have been monitoring and testing there, someone posted on the forums and I thought I would share..

concerning fallout in the Bay area of I-131


Estimate of total amount of radiation that fell down here during the last rainy period
A: Bay Area has a area of 7000 square miles, or 1.8 x 10^10 square meters.
B: Assuming the rain was 10 inches to 20 inches deep; I will take an average of 15 inches, which is 0.38 meters.
C: the average I131 concentration is around 7 Bq/L, or 190 pCi/L, or 1.9E5 pCi/m3.
So here we go: A*B*C=1.3E15 pCi, or 1,300 Curie I131. (That's 72 nCi per square meter).

To put it in context: 3 mile island: 17 curie total release.


that is showing the total amount of I-131 to hit the bay area to be 1,300 Curie

someone later corrected him with the rain fall amounts of 5 inches
that brought the total down to 430 curie for the bay area..compared to the 17 curie release at TMI

again i can not say if that is right or wrong, just sharing

Source



posted on Mar, 30 2011 @ 02:57 PM
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reply to post by brocktoon
 


You know, I have been thinking a similar thing from early on, perhaps soon after the first alarm bells began ringing re: MSM reporting on the incident.

I was thinking less about public opinion, but more of how leaderships, or indeed terrorists, may react to the simple fact that the world will have moved through a(nother) potentially devastating nuclear fallout/pollution incident, and that, to some extent the world will have continued turning, and there they are with some kind of nuclear (be it dirty bombs, power station attacks, or conventionally deployed warheads) option that they may have been more concerned about being associated with than they may be in the wake of all this from a nation that is, and will I should imagine continue to be considered, one of the good guys, a key global economy and democracy...

Yes that concerns me deeply too.




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