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Japan declares 'nuclear emergency' after quake

page: 399.htm
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posted on Mar, 28 2011 @ 07:26 PM
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reply to post by okiecowboy
 


The German site ZAMG has been running some computer simulations and then comparing them to actual wind and radio-active fall-out. They have some numbers listed for Sacremento (Stockton or Bakersfield would be better as that's where a lot of the wind comes in and goes out of the central valley)

The


and here is today's cloud




Radiation is like a blind man shooting at you from across a field. If the back ground radiation is six shots thats a bit frightening but probably survival-able, if the back ground doubles (still harmless right ) then the blind guy gets twelve shots at you , a bit scarier. Move the scale up to ten times back-ground ( maybe something to be concerned about ) and now the blind man gets 60 shots , That's f'n scary.

if it's cesium and iodine you will see more cancers, it's a fact but on the west coast at this point 5% more cancers than normal over the next twenty years, but the longer she blows the higher the numbers , but if plutonium and Uranyl chloride start being detected all bets are off.




posted on Mar, 28 2011 @ 07:34 PM
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So I finished reading 51 pages... I think it took me 5+ hours.


Yeah the situation ain't getting better...

In Japanese, but announcing plans by the Japanese government to nationalize TEPCO

Probably will be done soon... because TEPCO will go bankrupt for sure... so the Japanese government will pay everything.

And TEPCO shares trading was halted at the NIKKEI on ``rumors`` of nationalization.



posted on Mar, 28 2011 @ 07:38 PM
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reply to post by Vitchilo
 

what a sham ...so the very people being irradiated by these clusterf@cks are going to have to pay for all the clean-up? they should be getting out the sepuku so that the Japanese heads of Tepco can step down with honor



posted on Mar, 28 2011 @ 07:43 PM
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I just saw them announce that another live conference is going to be on NHK very soon.

www3.nhk.or.jp...



posted on Mar, 28 2011 @ 07:46 PM
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reply to post by Silverlok

What did you expect? No matter what the crisis, it always ends up with those worst affected being the ones to pay the final costs.

I think it's hard-coded in our DNA or something...

TheRedneck



posted on Mar, 28 2011 @ 07:51 PM
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Originally posted by MissTiger
A journalist measured radiation near the plant


Their car stopped in front of a local hospital, 3 kilometres from the nuclear power plant, and Toyoda, who has covered depleted uranium exposure in Iraq, measured the ambient radiation with his Geiger counter. "It went off the scale," which goes up to 1,000 microsieverts per hour, Toyoda recalled. "I thought out loud, 'Unbelievable. It's frightening.'"



Toyoda said he had never seen such high readings, even in deserted houses near the Chernobyl nuclear plant or Iraqi armoured vehicles destroyed by depleted uranium shells. Although he has had no immediate symptoms, he said he has been worried about the effects on his health ever since.


They said this could have been because....


Toyoda learned after his initial reading that the plant's operator, Tokyo Electric Power Co (TEPCO), had vented radioactive gas at one of the troubled reactors one hour before his measurement. He said he believed that pushed the figure up.


And then.....


In fact, when he went back to the same spot March 22, the reading was 150 microsieverts per hour. Toyodo also took other readings nearby. On March 14, three day after the earthquake, Toyoda detected 20 microsieverts per hour at Soma Port, 43 kilometres north of the plant, and 40 microsieverts per hour in Minami Soma City, 27 kilometres north of Futaba.


earthtimes


So if they got those readings from that far away from the plant and it went off the scale........I can't even imagine what it could be in the plant.


Just for comparison, in my home, which is built directly over a creek, the radiation is 0.16 microsieverts per hour.

- We got a dosimeter a year back.
- Not sure if dosimeter is the correct term, but the manufacturer calls it that.



posted on Mar, 28 2011 @ 07:51 PM
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reply to post by MissTiger
 

Yep, just starting now ...
NHK World w/Embedded Video



posted on Mar, 28 2011 @ 07:57 PM
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Originally posted by Silverlok
reply to post by Kailassa
 

That one worked thanks , I just love how the times gives us figures like

has either 64 large fuel rods or 81 slightly smaller fuel rods. A typical fuel rod assembly has roughly 380 pounds of uranium.

that don't allow for calculation as to how much total fuel was there exactly. And even less info about the MOX, two interesting things though this bit about another containment problem at a different location

A spent fuel pool at Rokkasho spilled over, and power at the plant was lost, triggering backup generators, Japan Nuclear Fuel said.


and the fact we are seeing media creeping (again) as the MSM dial moves a little farther away from our NUCLEAR BRITAIN friends view and a little closer to the disaster view

I think that if anything good comes from this disaster it will be the fact that all these reactors (especially in the U.S.) are nuclear waste time bombs that need to be address NOW no matter the cost ( and after watching this Tepco debacle if the try to make the tax payer pay for it I am getting out my pitch fork torch and goon boots )

I've noticed the other plants damaged by the earthquake/tsunami have not been mentioned since.
I wonder just what is being kept under the radar in those cases.

The Japanese gov't told TEPCO a couple of days back that the exemption for financial responsibility could not apply to them in this case.



posted on Mar, 28 2011 @ 08:03 PM
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reply to post by TheRedneck
 


...change... I guess , man. All this pounding sand just gets me a little bent, the idea that some fat pink handed money grubbing sleaze-bag is going to be able to slide out from underneath this puts me in a clavicle cracking humor, I don't know though perhaps a few peopl in the Japanese goverbusinesment have had a little steam blown up their skirts tooo...one can hope



posted on Mar, 28 2011 @ 08:03 PM
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reply to post by EnhancedInterrogator
 


Did you see them speak over him so we couldn't hear what other questions were being asked and then they cut off from it?? They have never done that before



posted on Mar, 28 2011 @ 08:07 PM
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reply to post by Kailassa
 


Woah,

Thankyou, I don't know much about any of the meters but I am learning very quickly. I keep wondering why alot of people on ATS seem to have them and I don't!
edit on 28/3/11 by MissTiger because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 28 2011 @ 08:12 PM
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reply to post by Silverlok
 


Can you provide some insight into uranyl chloride. I just looked it up and found that it is "spectacularly toxic if inhaled or swallowed". How possible is it that this is one of the compounds that might be present in this toxic soup around Japan?



posted on Mar, 28 2011 @ 08:13 PM
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reply to post by MissTiger

Toyoda learned after his initial reading that the plant's operator, Tokyo Electric Power Co (TEPCO), had vented radioactive gas at one of the troubled reactors one hour before his measurement. He said he believed that pushed the figure up.
Source: www.earthtimes.org...

That would be the venting we were told about a couple days after the quake... the same venting that was considered at the time to be "safe". Yet this "safe" venting turns out to have caused a 1 Sv/h meter to peg 3 km away. Yeah, that's "safe"... not!

But we already knew TEPCO had been lying from the start... so this one excerpt was what actually caught my attention:

In Minami Soma, when Toyoda was surveying the city three days after the quake, one elderly woman approached the journalist and asked him what he was doing.

Toyoda told her the readings from his Geiger counter, but he said, like many members of the public, she did not appear to understand what they meant. "So I asked her to go inside the house and take a shower. Then she said, 'How can I do that without electricity and water?' Her words made me speechless. But that was the reality of the disaster-stricken area."
Source: www.earthtimes.org...

I think my heart is sore.


TheRedneck



posted on Mar, 28 2011 @ 08:18 PM
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Hope this helps.

en.wikipedia.org...

Uranyl chloride, UO2Cl2 is an unstable, bright yellow coloured chemical compound of uranium. It forms large sand-like crystals which are highly soluble in water, alcohols and ethers. Uranyl chloride, and its two hydrates (UO2Cl2·H2O and UO2Cl2·3H2O) decomposes in the presence of light, a fact discovered by Adolph Gehlen in 1804, This photosensitivity periodically attracted scientific curiosity and various unsuccessful attempts to develop photographic applications using the salts. As with most other uranic species this compound also exhibits fluorescence.

Uranyl chloride is formed when chlorine gas is passed over uranium dioxide at a red heat. However it is more usually obtained by dissolving uranium oxide in hydrochloric acid and evaporating.

The company Indian Rare Earths Limited (IREL) has developed a process to extract uranium from the Western and Eastern coastal dune sands of India. After pre-processing with high intensity magnetic separators and fine grinding, the mineral sands (known as monazite), are digested with caustic soda at about 120C and water. The hydroxide concentrate is further digested with concentrated hydrochloric acid to solubilise all hydroxides to form a feed solution composed of chlorides of uranium and other rare earth elements including thorium. The solution is subjected to solvent extraction with dual solvent systems to produce uranyl chloride and thorium oxalate. The crude uranyl chloride solution is subsequently refined to nuclear grade ammonium diuranate by a purification process involving precipitation and solvent extraction in a nitrate media.



posted on Mar, 28 2011 @ 08:19 PM
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Originally posted by Kailassa

Originally posted by Silverlok
reply to post by Kailassa

I've noticed the other plants damaged by the earthquake/tsunami have not been mentioned since.
I wonder just what is being kept under the radar in those cases.

The Japanese gov't told TEPCO a couple of days back that the exemption for financial responsibility could not apply to them in this case.



NIiice . I missed that but I wonder how much of Tepco is liquid. I bet someone has been movingmoney by the tcuk load since this thing started

the guy crowd sourcing here seems to have higher than one would expect coming from the plants south of fukushima and this guy has some interesting crowd source radiation feeds , but though we heard a few thing about other plants (to the west and south) the news on what is happen outside of fukushima is even more wraith like

Of course with people saying provably false things like this:


(Dr. Robert Peter Gale)"Since the Fukushima accident at the moment much is of a much lower magnitude, it's hard to imagine that there would be serious health consequences from it," Gale said. It may be weeks before the plant is stabilized and years to clean up contamination at the complex. However, Gale predicts the toll on public health will be minimal.


On mass mediawe will have to keep digging

edit on 28-3-2011 by Silverlok because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 28 2011 @ 08:23 PM
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reply to post by TheRedneck
 


Thank you for a well explained post



The amounts of cesium may be another story, since cesium 137 has a long half-life. I just don't expect that there will be much cesium entering the US, since we are so far away. Like iodine, we will see some, but how much is too much?


Yeah that whole how much is too much part is the sticky thing

that beings me back to the point about the debate about "background radiation" things that everyone (not counting this thread) are tossing about to make it sound so safe... comparing it to air travel, eating bananas etc..

so just what is the "Natural occurring" levels of of caesium-137 or Iodine-131???
you and I both know the answer to that..

and I agree that you are most likely right about Pu-239...I hope not even a little shows up here

what about Strontium-90 or krypton-85 I have heard no mention of those in the news yet, should those or any of the other not so nice pruducts be a concern to anyone outside Japan?
edit on 28-3-2011 by okiecowboy because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 28 2011 @ 08:24 PM
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Link to several forcasting models of jetstream + Fukushima web cam



This site will also give you the altitude at "surface", "2500m" and "5000m".



Also, here is a good link to a "crowdsourced" radiation monitoring system (like foursquare) where individuals all over the world are sending in their readings and this is getting pulled onto the google map API. There are also the "offical/gov" readings, these are indicated by the different colours of the pins. Clicking on the pins allows you to see what the instrument was calibrated for and it's /Sv equivalent (where there is one). Anyone with a meter can sign up and begin submitting readings.. I encourage you to do so if you have a meter.

www.rdtn.org...



I've posted these before but thought it was worth posting again, since in such a long thread it can get lost. Welcome to 400 pages everyone! Good for ATS and I'm so grateful to you all for your contributions.



posted on Mar, 28 2011 @ 08:24 PM
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Originally posted by Kailassa

...

- We got a dosimeter a year back.
- Not sure if dosimeter is the correct term, but the manufacturer calls it that.


Good job. I think everybody should have a dosimeter and a charger for it. I'm old school and prefer the analog type with the cat's whisker eyepiece.

It's actually more useful in a nuclear accident (or WAR) than a meter because it is capable of detecting the high radiation levels after (fill in the blank, sigh).

Scenario, war, you know there is radiation outside the house but don't know if it's safe to go out yet. So you charge your dos. put it outside on the picnic table. After one or two hours you retrieve it and determine if the levels are 'safe' yet.

Obviously analog cat's wisker instruments are 'better' BECAUSE the EMP won't fry them.

Pencil Dosimeters



posted on Mar, 28 2011 @ 08:27 PM
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reply to post by TheRedneck
 





I think my heart is sore.


I know what you mean.


These nuclear reactors have took too much attention away from the people.



posted on Mar, 28 2011 @ 08:27 PM
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Watch this.

www.youtube.com...



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