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Japan declares 'nuclear emergency' after quake

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posted on Mar, 28 2011 @ 04:27 AM
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Latest TEPCO radiation numbers

According to this release radiation in the contaminated pool has increased from 1.9 Ci/gallon to 2.09 Ci/gallon in the flooded basement of the turbine building in the prior 28 hours.

I-131 was steady, Other isotopes showed increases.

Total this is a 9.7% radiation increase in the basement in 28 hours.

Do you think it will increase another 10% tomorrow? That would put the Ci/gallon at 2.29 ... I bet we see less than that and maybe even a decrease.




posted on Mar, 28 2011 @ 04:39 AM
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Originally posted by SDoradus
A. No I don't think Japan is trying to develop nuclear weapons. After all they have us to protect them and we have been such a good ally to our friends of late. Iran on the other hand is developing bombs, in secret.


See I have always found this strange, I always think of "keep your friends close but your enemys closer." I've always found japans obsession with US culture weird given the US govt wiped out a sizable portion of the entire japanese race. (and mostly civilians at that).

However, thats not the point, if Japan was enriching nuclear weapons it would be to SELL to the US anyway. I also found the paint work on the reactors strange, its oddly similar to the camouflage on the new Chinese Navy vessels.

It may not be camo, it just stood out to me.
edit on 28/3/11 by S3ns1bl3 because: Spelling



posted on Mar, 28 2011 @ 04:50 AM
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Originally posted by xxcatcatcatxx
hi guys, still back in england atm

do you think there's ANY possibilty of returning safely to Japan?
loads of my friends are still over there. I know its naive but the lack of media coverage here made me think everything was ok ... is this wrong?

Have things got worse? I thought someone said about half life, so how is the substance still radioactive? Doesn't it cool down by itself?

sorry to be so ignorant :S


Hi there. Personally I think you should visit this thread in about 3 months. If things are looking better then visit Japan by all means. but for now there's no change.

In fact a few weeks ago there was hope of TEPCO finding a resolution, They have tried pumping water internally and externally. They have tried reconnecting power as well. But for now it's all gone quiet as far as efforts to resolve the meltdowns but the radiation levels have not subsided...

I suspect in the next 3 months we will know if the vessels can contain the molten mass. I the meanwhile why go over there to breath Plutonium when you can breath far less of it here in the UK.....



posted on Mar, 28 2011 @ 04:54 AM
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reply to post by SDoradus
 


I am trying to understand the mess made with the measurements...
do you have, by any chance, some insight as to why the sample was taken at 8.50 a. m and not analysed until 18.50, exactly 10 hours later, and not straight away?
Given that short lived stuff would not be even traceable after 10 hours...that sounds odd to me

Is there a technical reason for it? is it normal to leave such a long time lapse for such an important measurement?
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posted on Mar, 28 2011 @ 04:57 AM
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Originally posted by SDoradus


A. No I don't think Japan is trying to develop nuclear weapons. After all they have us to protect them and we have been such a good ally to our friends of late. Iran on the other hand is developing bombs, in secret.

B. Actually the Japanese government ordered TEPCO to not release reports today unless they are absolutely certain of their results. This should slow down information a bit.

Edano warns TEPCO on mistakes



your not a member of the japaneese government are you ??? and why the sudden pop at iran?? this really doesnt have much to do with a nuclear meltdown does it ?!
edit on 28-3-2011 by boaby_phet because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 28 2011 @ 05:00 AM
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Originally posted by SDoradus
I don't believe that they are hiding information, I do believe that they can't believe the numbers that they have seen, after all they have believed for years that this can't happen and that it's perfectly safe. There is a bit of cognitive dissonance to overcome first.
Cognative Dissonance


Now here's a topic I know something about......(Psychology was my field of study in college.)

We are certainly seeing an extraordinary level of cognitive dissonance, but I don't think that's the issue with those releasing the information. They know exactly what is going on, and they are being vague and overly optimistic to keep people from panicking. Now, IF they were doing this because they were getting prepared to evacuate people and they wanted to minimize panic, then maybe it could be excused (for a very short time), but clearly they have no intention of doing that....which is sad because they could have already had those people out.

The cognitive dissonance problem comes in when we talk about the people of Japan, and for that matter, the majority of people in the rest of the world as well. I have noticed amongst my friends and family some very clear signs that this is what is going on. My mom for example, can see 10 articles about how horrible the situation is, but if she can find 1 that says it's going to be okay, she'll dismiss the rest because it makes her feel better to believe the 1 positive story. Others I know aren't keeping up on it at all because they say, "it's too sad to watch." And these are people that are not even in Japan!


I also think this is partly the reason we see all these stories coming out about radiation being good. On one level of course, it is nothing but spin to keep people calm and convinced that everything is fine, but there's more to it then that.....

The people in Japan are trying to come to terms with 2 very troubling realities. 1. Radiation is spewing all over the place in Japan, and radiation IS NOT good. 2. I live in Japan. Of those two choices, it is easier to change your belief about radiations affects than to move out of Japan. The same applies to the rest of the world on a slightly smaller scale.

Still though, the cognitive dissonance worldwide on this issue eclipses anything I've ever seen before. Of course that's to be expected. With something of this magnitude, it stands to reason that the level of cognitive dissonance would be at equally high levels.

It's definitely a lot to digest. Even if they were to put a stop to it tomorrow (which they won't), there has already been a huge environmental impace on Japan and on the Pacific. Earlier this evening I was trying to assimilate to the idea that the oceans I frequent and find great tranquility in, may soon be unsafe to swim in. That's almost unfathomable to me, and incredibly sad. It might not have the quite the same impact for those that didn't grow up near the ocean, but for those that did, it feels very personal, and is a terrible tragedy.

As if all the oil in the gulf coast area wasn't enough, now it seems we most likely could end up with a completely radioactive Pacific. For now though, I'm just keeping my fingers crossed that we won't have to tell the future generation this story by starting off with, "Before you were born, people used to live in Japan......."



posted on Mar, 28 2011 @ 05:25 AM
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Just touched down in Narita. Many more people than I expected on the flight back, then in the airport. Didn't get to see the checkin floor to see if there were lots of people leaving still. Seems like business as usual, in Tokyo at least. I did notice a lot of foreign returnees, possibly people who evacuated temporarily, not sure, didn't ask them in person.

Short update: on a TCAT bus now, going to be headed deeper into Tokyo. But so far the bus has been making rounds to the other terminals. Seriously looks like the situation is normal here. Everyone playing with their cellphones, some people with masks on. It's 7:40pm and around 8 degrees C outside.

The only thing that even suggests to me that this isn't some parallel Tokyo is the fact that many lights are dimmed. On the roads--the street lamps--and back at the airport too.
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posted on Mar, 28 2011 @ 05:26 AM
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Taiwan detects low radiation on Japanese food packaging



Taiwan authorities have detected a third case of radioactive contamination of Japanese food imports but the readings were well within safe limits, the local media reported Monday.

Taiwan's Atomic Energy Council said carton paper packaging for ''udon'' noodles tested positive Friday for radiation, but no radiation was found in the noodles nor in the plastic bags containing them.


link



posted on Mar, 28 2011 @ 05:26 AM
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reply to post by TheRedneck
 

Morning Redneck and everyone.

Got up, swtiched on laptop, logged into ATS, found page on this thread where I was last reading. That's my routine these past couple of weeks. The news will be here if there is any. Thanks to all of you here.

Down to the discussion. When the official said that the "partial meltdown is only temporary", I immediately thought, "Oh, the clever b*stards!" Of course it's only temporary, because when it's all finally melted, it's no longer 'partial', it's 'total'!"

Just like a "partially-melted" ice cube in a drink, right? That's also "temporary"...

About their (ahem) plan of action with the neat graphic that lists all the points in sequence and that has "plug the leak" as the last point. Ummm... Ever seen a car radiator with a hole in it? There's no point putting more coolant into the system until that's fixed. There's no point doing much of anything until you fix the darned leak.

A reactor is not a car radiator but the logic's the same. To me, anyway.

By the way, someone commented on how the graphic had the word "gauge" in relation to the control room and took it to mean that they it referred to the control room's gauges (with by implication a misprint as it only showed one gauge).

I think that might have been a slight but perhaps intentional mis-translation to add another layer of ambiguity and hence confusion. Perhaps a better alternative to "gauge" could be "assess", as in "see what happens". In other words (pun), it was a verb, not a noun:
"Re-connect power to the control room and see what happens."

Just my take on it, of course. I could be wrong. But that's the problem: they want to keep us confused.

Oh, just something else I thought of the other day but forgot to mention. (I am a bit scatter-brained.) Many years ago, a mechanic friend who worked on racing cars ("racecars" in US jargon) gave me a very useful tip.

"If your temp gauge shows your engine's running hot, well in most cars it's actualy measuring coolant temperature. So it means your coolant's hot and you'll know this for sure if you see steam coming out somewhere. But if the gauge suddenly goes back down to "cold" way faster than it normally could and the steam goes away, then that's a big problem. It doesn't mean your engine suddenly cooled down. It means that your coolant was leaking and now it's all gone."

I'm still on first coffee and can't remember exactly why I wanted to mention this but I suspect it was relevant to something somebody said. Anyway, I'll leave it with you.

EDIT: Lord, I'm fuzzy-headed this morning! No, I wasn't drinking. Just too many late nights, like most of you I guess...

If the temp gauges for coolant in the reactor systems are immersion types -- meaning they're in contact with the coolant -- then if they show a very low temp, don't assume that the coolant is now okay. Just read what my old mechanic friend told me (above).

2nd EDIT: reply to post by butcherguy
 

You said the same thing as I did about what "temporary partial meltdown" can mean. Sorry that I didn't catch your post before I wrote mine. But yeah, I think they made that statement to tell the truth without saying it outright. AS always, we have to read between the lines and we need big spaces between them to fit in all the real stuff.

Mike


edit on 28/3/11 by JustMike because: added Edits



posted on Mar, 28 2011 @ 05:27 AM
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Originally posted by vox2442


Given that as of this morning's IAEA brief, the RPV temperatures at daiichi 1 and 2 were 142C (and falling) and 96C (and falling), and that pressure at 2 and 3 remain stable, and furthermore that radiation levels both in the suppression areas and surrounding the plant are decreasing, I think you might be a *tad* on the alarmist side by suggesting the best case scenerio is melting through to the water table.



VOX

I have a serious question.
How are they getting these RPV temperatures and pressure readings?
(see below)

www.abovetopsecret.com...


Originally posted by makeitso
How Much Does Japan Know About the Status of its Reactors?

Fukushima Unit 2 Control Room



A - Computer monitors are blank.
B - Clock out of service.
C - Annunciators seem to be de-energized: no alarms reported despite many plant parameters off-normal.
D - Equipment status indicator lights not available.
E - Instrument gauges all downscale (not reading parameter values).


As you can see, the lights are on now, but thats it. No monitoring, etc.





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posted on Mar, 28 2011 @ 05:40 AM
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I had a really weird dream last night....

Our oceans were full of weird creatures, just like the cheap Si-fi movies....but hey, we all know that the Si-fi movies are usually proved true....

SHARKTOPUS
DINOCROC V SUPERGATOR
MEGA SHARK V GIANT OCTOPUS
MEGA PIRANHA

Anyway my point is, if they keep pumping this cr4p into our oceans then sooner or later we WILL be seeing these strange and deadly creatures.....After all, thats how you make a mutant.




posted on Mar, 28 2011 @ 05:52 AM
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Originally posted by MissTiger

Call to widen evacuation area around Fukushhima



Fukushima, March 27, 2011: Greenpeace radiation experts have confirmed radiation levels of up to ten micro Sieverts per hour in Iitate village, 40km northwest of the crisis-stricken Fukushima/Daiichi nuclear plant, and 20km beyond the official evacuation zone. These levels are high enough to require evacuation. “It is clearly not safe for people to remain in Iitate, especially children and pregnant women, when it could mean receiving the maximum allowed annual dose of radiation in only a few days. When further contamination from possible ingestion or inhalation of radioactive particles is factored in, the risks are even higher.”


Greenpeace

I understand that some may think they have their own agenda but they are there and they aren't a Government.


Pssst. Its not just Greenpeace getting those readings.


Other measurements reported by the IAEA also show disturbing upward trends. For instance, on March 27 the IAEA reported dose rates on March 26 measured in a region from 30 to 41 kilometers from Fukushima as ranging from 0.9 to 17 microSievert per hour, and total beta-gamma contamination levels ranging from 0.03 to 3.1 megabecquerels per square meter (MBq/sq. m).


IAEA Data Appear to Show Increased Ground Contamination. Why Doesn’t the IAEA Just Say So?



posted on Mar, 28 2011 @ 06:25 AM
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reply to post by makeitso
 



How are they getting these RPV temperatures and pressure readings?
They are lying.

I think they lost instrumentation on the first day, and they don't know what is happening for sure.

When TMI happened, they never had to leave the site at all, yet it was many years until they could verify that the partial core melt had occurred. They really were not sure what was happening at the time, they just guessed and did their best to keep cooling water circulating in both loops.



posted on Mar, 28 2011 @ 07:07 AM
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I see Wikipedia has now quite a detailed description of the happenings at Fukoshima :

en.wikipedia.org...



posted on Mar, 28 2011 @ 07:08 AM
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I am hoping Zorgon can back me up on this as he has also watched the LIVE press conferences on NHK, not when they are being replayed. It is possible that things are being lost in translation but it is also possible important information is being edited out and translations of things that makes them look unprofessional. Maybe a better translation is being added later on but replayed versions are far shorter than the original broadcasts.

I have been unable to find information to back this up but this is what I heard being translated at the last LIVE conference I watched.

When they announced the 1,000 millisieverts the translation was followed by "well that it what we think it is, we don't know, it is off the meter"

Does anyone know what meter they are using and what it's maximum reading is?

They also said according to live translation "A witness has seen a pool of water near a gutter outside the building but we don't know this we have to check"

I know I shouldn't post things I can't back up but I think it is important that as many people as possible watch the live broadcast on NHK as possible.



posted on Mar, 28 2011 @ 07:13 AM
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Highly radioactive water leaks from Japanese nuclear plan



(Reuters) - Highly radioactive water has leaked from a reactor at Japan's crippled nuclear complex, the plant's operator said on Monday, while environmental group Greenpeace said it had detected high levels of radiation outside an exclusion zone.




TEPCO later said radiation above 1,000 millisieverts per hour was found in water in tunnels used for piping outside the reactor.





Greenpeace said its experts had confirmed radiation levels of up to 10 microsieverts per hour in a village 40 km (25 miles) northwest of the plant. It called for the extension of a 20-km (12-mile) evacuation zone.




Beyond the evacuation zone, traces of radiation have turned up in tap water in Tokyo and as far away as Iceland.



posted on Mar, 28 2011 @ 07:16 AM
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reply to post by MissTiger
 


I was watching NHK World at around 5 AM this morning. They were showing a replay of a reporter talking to the nuclear specialist, and when the reporter asked the expert about how hard it would be to get the radioactive water out of the turbine, the expert started saying that it wouldn't be that easy...and then NHK World cut off the interview in mid sentence to go to the next story.
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posted on Mar, 28 2011 @ 07:19 AM
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reply to post by MissTiger
 


I watched NHK briefly too today.


I can confirm they said that they found high levels of radiation in a trench 60 meters outside reactor 2.

The values in the water seem to correlate to those found in the turbines of n.2 leading them to conclude that there must be leaks between the turbines and the trench.

If you look at the pic of the trench below, it has kind of a U shape, if the levels of water in the trench rise another few centimeters (as far as I can remember), the radioactive water will start flowing to the sea


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posted on Mar, 28 2011 @ 07:30 AM
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reply to post by windwaker
 


I have noticed them doing this aswell but unfortunatley it seems that NHK is our best source of information at the moment especially when it is live. We have to understand too that it's quite possible the translator is in Japan, hearing this report first hand and they are having to digest this information at the same time. As people have mentioned, they have had onscreen reporters crying while on air.



posted on Mar, 28 2011 @ 07:32 AM
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I think that the trench is already overflowing during high-tide, and that would explain why high levels of radioactivity are found in the sea.


Originally posted by monica86
reply to post by MissTiger
 


I watch NHK briefly too today.


I can confirm they said that they found high levels of radiation in a trench 60 meters outside reactor 2.

The values in the water seem to correlate to those found in the turbines of n.2 leading them to conclude that there must be leaks between the turbines and the trench.

If you look at the pic of the trench below, it has kind of a U shape, if the levels of water in the trench rise another few centimeters (as far as I can remember), the radioactive water will start flow to the sea


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