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Japan declares 'nuclear emergency' after quake

page: 383.htm
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posted on Mar, 28 2011 @ 12:45 AM
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reply to post by bitbytebit
 


That's one single sentence! That's but ONE of the possible outcomes!!!! Please, read the article. Like this:


The thermal hydraulics of corium-concrete interactions (CCI, or also MCCI, "molten core-concrete interactions") is sufficiently understood.[8] However the dynamics of the movement of corium in and outside of the reactor vessel is highly complex, and the number of possible scenarios is wide; slow drip of melt into an underlying water pool can result in complete quenching, while a fast contact of large mass of corium with water may result in destructive steam explosion. Corium may be completely retained by the reactor vessel, or the reactor floor or some of the instrument penetration holes can be melted through.[9]


But that would just be a total fantasy slow-drip of melt it's referring to, because that's impossible, right?




posted on Mar, 28 2011 @ 12:45 AM
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off-topic post removed to prevent thread-drift


 



posted on Mar, 28 2011 @ 12:46 AM
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off-topic post removed to prevent thread-drift


 



posted on Mar, 28 2011 @ 12:47 AM
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reply to post by vox2442
 




Sorry, it sounds to me like you're engaging in little more than speculative fiction at this point. But hey, you're in Alabama, I'm just some guy in Japan. I'm willing to bet that in a year from now, I'll still be here posting. You?

Remember media and government propaganda is real. You sound like a level headed person. I ask you to take a step back and gather information for yourself. Do not only rely on the information coming from your people in power. All governments bend the truth to serve their agenda.


All governments bend the truth to serve their agenda.


All governments bend the truth to serve their agenda.

edit on 28-3-2011 by liejunkie01 because: sorry I forgot quote



posted on Mar, 28 2011 @ 12:48 AM
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reply to post by TheRedneck
 


If anyone is actually interested, the latest data has been posted. This time with sample dates and times for our half life calculating pleasure.

TEPCO Press Release

I find the data more interesting when I convert it from Bq/cc to Ci/gallon. The Cs-134 comes out to about 0.24 Ci/gallon. (Which seems like a lot.)

I wounder how many gallons of this 'stuff' are in the 'basement'?



posted on Mar, 28 2011 @ 12:49 AM
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reply to post by TheRedneck
 


On page 374 right now, been at work all night and trying to catch up, but a couple of quick questions if I may.

Does the rating for worldwide concern depend on the number of units that produce said steam explosion?

1 unit = 5
2 units = 6

etc

Crazy daisy made a comment over in the Quake Watch thread that bears repeating here:


Originally posted by crazydaisy
reply to post by Pharyax
 





3.x miles in depth! wow. They are saying on TV a tsunami warning is in effect.. That would be REALLY bad, even if the waves were 2-5 feet, because it would push all that radiation covered water onto land... Hope there isn't one.




As soon as I heard about the tsunami following this quake I thought of the radiaition it could spread. This just gets worse every day. Also, that was a very significant quake that could have also done some damage.


Sorry if this has already been mentioned here, but wanted to bring it in if it hasn't been considered. I admit that I had not. I KNOW there are continuing to be aftershocks and it's very possible for one to occur and produce another tsunami. There's already been a couple near enough to the plant to have been felt. Which likely only exacerbates the structural problems of what's left of the reactors.

This really is a f'ed situation, like yourself RedNeck and probably everyone else here, I am apoplectic in a way I had not thought possible.

My 14 and 13 year olds know enough to not build anything near as dangerous as a nuclear power plant in an area of HIGH SEISMICITY. I've got 3 other children besides those two, one of which is autistic, and all of them together have more sense than any of these buffoons at Tepco.

And then we find out that although there is a large amount of evidence that they discarded older records of quakes of this magnitude:

The misplaced confidence displayed by Tokyo Electric Power Co. was prompted by a series of overly optimistic assumptions that concluded the Earth couldn't possibly release the level of fury it did two weeks ago, pushing the six-reactor Fukushima Dai-ichi complex to the brink of multiple meltdowns.

more

In postulating the maximum-sized earthquake and tsunami that the Fukushima Dai-ichi complex might face, TEPCO's engineers decided not to factor in quakes earlier than 1896. That meant the experts excluded a major quake that occurred more than 1,000 years ago — a tremor followed by a powerful tsunami that hit many of the same locations as the recent disaster.

Oh, then there's this:

And while TEPCO and government officials have said no one could have anticipated such a massive tsunami, there is ample evidence that such waves have struck the northeast coast of Japan before — and that it could happen again along the culprit fault line, which runs roughly north to south, offshore, about 220 miles (350 kilometres) east of the plant.


Then follows a good bit of technical data proving that similar quakes and tsunamis had happened in the past. And then we come to this:

But the authors went on to write that tsunami records before 1896 could be less reliable because of "misreading, misrecording and the low technology available for the measurement itself." The TEPCO employees and their colleagues concluded, "Records that appear unreliable should be excluded."


That's like saying the supernova that created the Crab Nebula didn't happen because the records and instrumentation of the Chinese were not as accurate or powerful as they are today.

Finally we come to this:

In contrast, when TEPCO calculated its high-water mark at 18 feet (5.7 metres), the anticipated maximum earthquake was in the same range as others recorded off the coast of Fukushima Dai-ichi — and the only assumption about the water level was that the tsunami arrived at high tide.

Which, as is abundantly clear now, could not have been more wrong.


Add this to the safety problems and accidents at this particular plant in the past, and what we are seeing is sadly inevitable.


Mike, you've about moved me to tears more than once, Thank You! You're appraisal and insight have been keen and illuminating.

Thank you also to everyone providing updates and knowledge, and suffering through these endless questions.

I am sorry everyone for spouting, but this situation is mind boggling and the more I learn, thanks to everyone here, the more disturbed I become. I need to remember to breath.



posted on Mar, 28 2011 @ 12:50 AM
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Water sample taken north of the No. 5 nuclear reactor has 1,150 times more radiation than normal



As officials scrambled to determine the source of the radioactive water, chief Cabinet Secretary Yukio Edano repeated Monday that the contaminated water in No. 2 appeared to be due to a temporary partial meltdown of the reactor core.

He called it “very unfortunate” but said the spike in radiation appeared limited to the unit.

However, new readings show contamination in the ocean has spread about 1.6 kilometers further north of the nuclear site than before. Radioactive iodine-131 was discovered just offshore from Nos. 5 and 6 reactors at a level 1,150 times higher than normal, Hidehiko Nishiyama, a spokesman for the Nuclear and Industrial Safety Agency, told reporters Mondaym www.npr.org...


And about that mistake earlier, well it was bad, so ignore it. Now its bad and ???


"The number is not credible," TEPCO spokesman Takashi Kurita said late Sunday. "We are very sorry."

A few hours later, TEPCO Vice President Sakae Muto said a new test had found radiation levels 100,000 times above normal — far better than the first results, though still very high.

But he ruled out having an independent monitor oversee the various checks despite the errors.

www.npr.org...



posted on Mar, 28 2011 @ 12:52 AM
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off-topic post removed to prevent thread-drift


 



posted on Mar, 28 2011 @ 12:52 AM
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Anyone that thinks partial meltdown is a myth or a term that has been recently coined, should read up on the Three Mile Island accident. Google it.
The core underwent partial meltdown. One third of the fuel rods melted and ran down to the bottom of the vessel.
I do not believe that partial meltdown has ever been possible at Fukushima, because I don't think that they have had sufficient cooling availble to stop the melting process midway.



posted on Mar, 28 2011 @ 12:53 AM
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reply to post by SDoradus
 


The Cs isotope concentrations are going up by the way. How interesting ...



posted on Mar, 28 2011 @ 12:53 AM
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reply to post by burntheships
 


But he ruled out having an independent monitor oversee the various checks despite the errors...............

Where is the INTERNATIONAL COMMUNITY ON THIS ???????????????

I am beside myself when I read things like this!!!!



posted on Mar, 28 2011 @ 12:54 AM
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reply to post by Silverlok
 


So good, we've established then that I'm right and slow dripping of the corium from the reactor CAN happen, and you were incorrect to say "the energies involved invalidate that." Now we can move on.



posted on Mar, 28 2011 @ 12:56 AM
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Originally posted by vox2442

Originally posted by IDBIT
URGENT: Radioactive water at No. 2 reactor due to partial meltdown: Edano
TOKYO, March 28, Kyodo

The government believes highly radioactive water detected at the No. 2 reactor of the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant is due to a partial meltdown of fuel rods there, its top spokesman said Monday.

Chief Cabinet Secretary Yukio Edano told a news conference that the government believes that the meltdown was only temporary.

==Kyodo


I read that here, thanks. See my post a couple of pages back regarding the translation of "melt" and "meltdown". This is what happens when all the foreign staff freak out and leave the country.




So yo are saying that the correct translation would be that the Rods have partially melted.

en.wikipedia.org...(nuclear_reactor)

Reading about Corium, that was at the start of all this and that explains the Hydrogen release and explosions.

I sincerley hope you are right and it's stopped.



posted on Mar, 28 2011 @ 12:56 AM
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reply to post by Silverlok
 


nunya and you both want answers,as do the rest of us. Don't let semantics get in the way of it........
BTW,I find both yours,and nunya's posts in this thread,very informative. Keep it up!



posted on Mar, 28 2011 @ 12:58 AM
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reply to post by burntheships
 


I believe the original power company apology was for the bad measurement report of the I-134 isotope, which was about 297 Ci/gallon. Clearly very difficult to attain level, especially since the half life of the isotope is only 53 minutes.

People make mistakes, don't assume they are intentionally trying to hide stuff.



posted on Mar, 28 2011 @ 01:01 AM
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reply to post by 00nunya00
 


NO, and NO, but please give us some models based on your perspective



posted on Mar, 28 2011 @ 01:03 AM
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reply to post by Silverlok
 


Sure:


The thermal hydraulics of corium-concrete interactions (CCI, or also MCCI, "molten core-concrete interactions") is sufficiently understood.[8] However the dynamics of the movement of corium in and outside of the reactor vessel is highly complex, and the number of possible scenarios is wide; slow drip of melt into an underlying water pool can result in complete quenching, while a fast contact of large mass of corium with water may result in destructive steam explosion. Corium may be completely retained by the reactor vessel, or the reactor floor or some of the instrument penetration holes can be melted through.[9]


That's one model of slow drip. Can you invalidate it for me?



posted on Mar, 28 2011 @ 01:03 AM
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reply to post by butcherguy
 


do you understand critiality?



posted on Mar, 28 2011 @ 01:10 AM
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reply to post by 00nunya00
 


why don't you and I start a separate thread for this thing as it is not part of the forward motion of this thread



posted on Mar, 28 2011 @ 01:12 AM
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reply to post by Silverlok
 


Go for it. I'm satisfied that I'm absolutely correct in the matter, but we can debate it further if you would like. Let me know when you start it.

ETA: but I warn you, you WILL have to actually provide technical details as to why you think I'm wrong, and not just "therm-o-dynamics" answers.
edit on 28-3-2011 by 00nunya00 because: (no reason given)



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