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Japan declares 'nuclear emergency' after quake

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posted on Mar, 26 2011 @ 09:53 PM
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Originally posted by cripmeister
reply to post by MedievalGhost
 


Actually I think we're both wrong, here's what the article says


But the rest of the workforce, from firefighters to welders to electricians, are drawn from a pool of semi-skilled labour who work for low wages. Many work for associated companies such as Hitachi, Watanabe's employer, Toshiba, and Toden Kogyo.


Source

*underlined by me.

What's up with the defensive attitude MedievalGhost? Did I insult you?


edit on 26-3-2011 by cripmeister because: (no reason given)


Low wages? That's what they are worried about?

This should be handled by the most expensive professionals in the world. Money should not be an option in a situation like this. They should have the best of the best working round the clock for a proper solution. Stop pretending like help is not needed when you have done nothing, tepco keeps saying the do not know how to proceed.

Sorry for my rant.
low wages my ass!!

Pred...




posted on Mar, 26 2011 @ 09:55 PM
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reply to post by Wertwog

Those are 'cold' fusion reactors, much different in design than fission reactors like are in Fukushima. I don;t have a lot of faith in these reports since there have been innumerable organizations searching for ways to perform fusion at room temperatures for a long time, with no results.

Fusion does not produce radioactive waste.

TheRedneck



posted on Mar, 26 2011 @ 10:00 PM
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2 scary tweets about 30mins ago from voa

@W7VOA: NISA: Pool of highly radioactive water at Reactor 2 may be from reactor core. #Fukushima

RT @W7VOA: RT @martyn_williams: Radioactivity readings in sea near #Fukushima 1 are now 1850 times from normal, up from 1250 yesterday - NISA



posted on Mar, 26 2011 @ 10:00 PM
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From Kyodo News' ticker ...

NEWS ADVISORY: Pool of water at No.2 reactor may be from reactor core: safety agency (11:31)

RSS Feed

edit on 2011-3-26 by EnhancedInterrogator because: Added source link.



posted on Mar, 26 2011 @ 10:01 PM
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reply to post by AlaskanDad

Oh, this makes sense...
    "Hey, boss! We've just irradiated the northern half of the country. What do we do?"

    "How badly?"

    "They might be getting 20 times the limit."

    "Raise the limit to 20 times normal."

Am I the only one picking my jaw up off the floor after reading this?

TheRedneck



posted on Mar, 26 2011 @ 10:04 PM
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reply to post by TheRedneck
 


I knew I could reply on you to make sense of it


And it doesn't matter if the reactor was the wrong one TheRedneck, you eased us in to the worst news just like some certain Japanese people seem to be doing


Thankyou for all the time you and everyone else puts into this thread.

I'll be chained to the gates of Sizewell B nuclear plant by the end of this thread in April!

edit on 26/3/11 by MissTiger because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 26 2011 @ 10:07 PM
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New high levels of radioactive iodine in the sea...but same old line..

"no specific source"



Levels of radioactive iodine in the sea near the damaged Fukushima nuclear plant have risen further to 1,850 times higher than the usual level, says Japan's nuclear agency.[.b]

It is believed the radiation is coming from one of the reactors, but a specific leak has not been identified.
www.bbc.co.uk...


edit on 26-3-2011 by burntheships because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 26 2011 @ 10:07 PM
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reply to post by Wertwog

I still think we're talking about a release rather than an explosion, although a steam explosion once the corium reaches groundwater might be becoming possible. The difference is that we are probably looking at a faster radiation release than I originally thought, capable of poisoning an even larger area.

I still do not see any danger for the US/Canada, with the possible exception of the Alaskan/extreme north Canadian shoreline from the ocean (and I do not expect that to be severe, although it might be enough to warrant caution). One caveat to this is the possibility of a steam explosion, if the explosion is large enough to hoist radiation into the upper atmosphere. But even if that happens, you will have at least a couple days to prepare.

Still no cause for panic in North America. Sit still for now.

TheRedneck



posted on Mar, 26 2011 @ 10:11 PM
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NEWS ADVISORY- Over 1,000 millisieverts per hour found in water at No. 2 reactor (12:00)

Kyodo News
edit on 26-3-2011 by MedievalGhost because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 26 2011 @ 10:14 PM
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reply to post by MissTiger

Before you lock the chains in place, I suggest that you check to see if that is a BWR (Boiling Water Reactor) or PWR (Pressure Water Reactor) design. I still maintain that the PWR design is safe, while the BWR like in Fukushima is definitely dangerous. If it is BWR, I might be there with you (once I get some attention to the ones in Alabama and Georgia).

It's not nuclear energy that is dangerous; it is nuclear energy without a safety margin. Think of nuclear energy as a car... BWR reactors are like Yugos with no body shell, no brakes, loose steering, and a spark plug inside the gas tank.

TheRedneck



posted on Mar, 26 2011 @ 10:22 PM
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Originally posted by TheRedneck
reply to post by MissTiger

Before you lock the chains in place, I suggest that you check to see if that is a BWR (Boiling Water Reactor) or PWR (Pressure Water Reactor) design. I still maintain that the PWR design is safe, while the BWR like in Fukushima is definitely dangerous. If it is BWR, I might be there with you (once I get some attention to the ones in Alabama and Georgia).

It's not nuclear energy that is dangerous; it is nuclear energy without a safety margin. Think of nuclear energy as a car... BWR reactors are like Yugos with no body shell, no brakes, loose steering, and a spark plug inside the gas tank.

TheRedneck


Now add some MOX to one of those and about 600,000 spent fuel rods....



posted on Mar, 26 2011 @ 10:23 PM
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reply to post by TheRedneck
 

It seems to me that MANY changes in life have occurred in the past few years re disasters.
It infuriates me SO much!! Not sure at which point it started, before or post 911...as that was a MAJOR point when we the free started losing enormous rights...

BP Gulf...same as Japan Disaster...Our gov never stepped in to take control & let an Oil Company make all the rules...could keep going buy don't need to. ...

My gripe is there are standards for unsafe food & unsafe radiation...in my mind that "unsafe " is there for a reason & should not fluctuate until proven safe to do so, period. It seems that every time we have a crises
now THEY KEEP raising the "safe limits" to justify the level of the event in order to make everyone think it is safe when we know it clearly is not!
It's like yeah you should not have eaten that shrimp yesterday, or reactors were too high yesterday, however ALL safety levels were increased & everything is fine today! I hope there's a way of stopping this BS!

Ekltar



posted on Mar, 26 2011 @ 10:30 PM
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Sorry another question I had was in re to the "repaired & strapped" reactor...sorry I went back many pages to try & find the previous post...so my question is...
If we have a repaired & "strapped together" system then it does not seem that it was
updated for MOX...
Thank You Guys!!!

Ektar



posted on Mar, 26 2011 @ 10:33 PM
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NEWS ADVISORY: Radioactive iodine 134 extremely high in water at No.2 reactor: agency (12:26)

NEWS ADVISORY: Water in No. 4 reactor less radioactive than in other reactors: agency (12:20)

Kyodo News


edit on 26-3-2011 by MedievalGhost because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 26 2011 @ 10:34 PM
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reply to post by setione
 


why not, apparently they are taking mexicans in the us in droves, so why not take in a bunch of well educated hard working japanese?



posted on Mar, 26 2011 @ 10:36 PM
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reply to post by MedievalGhost
 

water in no4 less radioactive than in other reactors? You don't say? Were there even rods in reactor 4? Was that the only reactor that didn't have them? Geee thanks for letting us know captain obvious! (no offense to the poster, I was referring to yet another stupid statement by japanese media).



posted on Mar, 26 2011 @ 10:41 PM
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Originally posted by TheLastStand
reply to post by MedievalGhost
 

water in no4 less radioactive than in other reactors? You don't say? Were there even rods in reactor 4? Was that the only reactor that didn't have them? Geee thanks for letting us know captain obvious! (no offense to the poster, I was referring to yet another stupid statement by japanese media).

Yeah, I know. Some of their press releases are pretty vague and stupid.



posted on Mar, 26 2011 @ 10:45 PM
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reply to post by TheRedneck
 


I have a hard time thinking it's phoney when the university of balogne is backing the guy up and the government of greece is making a purchase of a 1 MW plant, he sounds like the real deal to me. And he likes my idea of integrating electrolysis to get hydrogen fuel for the reactor from water using idle power that would otherwise be wasted.



posted on Mar, 26 2011 @ 10:54 PM
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Radiation-free 'certificates' being issued in Fukushima; those without certificates being refused shelter admission



''Certificates'' are then issued by the doctors to those who have been declared free of any abnormality.

But these certificates have come to be an unexpected function in the community that has become nervous about anything radioactive. Some shelters have started demanding that certificates be presented before any residents evacuating from the nuclear disaster are admitted.

Some officials in the central government, however, are raising their eyebrows about such documentation while demand for them appears to be growing.

According to prefectural officials, there are about 30 screening teams each comprising around three people, including a doctor and a radiology technician.




But increasingly alert about radiation levels, shelters across the prefecture have started making it a requirement for residents to obtain such a certificate to show that they have gone through the screening, if they ever want to be allowed in the shelters. Some shelters are also requesting that such certificates be issued just to make sure that residents being admitted do not pose any safety risks.




At some shelters, however, certificates appear to have become an ''admission ticket.'' One shelter that has been accommodating residents who evacuated from within a 20-kilometer radius from the stricken power plant has put up a sign that says, ''Those who have not gone through radiation checks should not enter.'' ''We have noticed a rising number of cases where residents from the government-designated evacuation and stay-indoors areas have been refused admission,'' said Hiroyuki Hayashi, a 49-year-old doctor of Fukui prefectural hospital who has been engaged in the screenings.


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This is completely insane. They are issuing these so-called 'radiation-free' certificates as a feel-good tactic. Much of Fukushima prefecture is radioactive now. According to the article, there are only 30 screening teams in the whole prefecture issuing test certificates? And many shelters are refusing admission to people who don't have one? Where do these people get food, water and shelter if they are refused entrance for not having a certificate?!
edit on 26-3-2011 by MedievalGhost because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 26 2011 @ 10:55 PM
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off-topic post removed to prevent thread-drift


 




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