It looks like you're using an Ad Blocker.

Please white-list or disable AboveTopSecret.com in your ad-blocking tool.

Thank you.

 

Some features of ATS will be disabled while you continue to use an ad-blocker.

 

Japan declares 'nuclear emergency' after quake

page: 353.htm
513
<< 350  351  352    354  355  356 >>

log in

join
share:

posted on Mar, 26 2011 @ 02:13 PM
link   
reply to post by TheRedneck
 


Here is an example of the domed reactor buildings. This is Indian Point in NY on the Hudson River.





posted on Mar, 26 2011 @ 02:18 PM
link   

Originally posted by TheRedneck
reply to post by mrbillshow

Those are crane uprights... leftovers form construction that are left because 1) tearing them down just produces a lot of extra garbage, and 2) they can be used to make repairs/renovations in the future.

Cooling towers are the huge venturi-shaped buildings that produce steam from the top during operation. they are the tallest and largest structures in a US plant, and a lot of people mistakenly call them the reactors, because they dwarf the actual reactor buildings and because they look so unique.

I'll try to get a shot of the cooling towers at our plant when I am out today.

TheRedneck


Thanks. I'm thinking they could come in handy holding conduit for concrete injectors...



posted on Mar, 26 2011 @ 02:20 PM
link   
A question to those living in Japan or knowledgeable about their politics. How are the events of the last 2 weeks in regard to the N plant going to affect future elections? Is there a Green party that will ride the discontent to power? Is there discontent? Any sources in English that will bring me up to speed? Thanks!



posted on Mar, 26 2011 @ 02:22 PM
link   
reply to post by Erasurehead

Thank you! Between you and zorgon, I just saved a few gallons of gas.


The dome need not be that pronounced (ours are not), but so far all the US reactor buildings I have seen have some sort of dome on top.

TheRedneck



posted on Mar, 26 2011 @ 02:27 PM
link   
Apparently there having mechanical problems restarting two other nuclear plants ,



posted on Mar, 26 2011 @ 02:28 PM
link   
I wonder how safe the Swedish Oskarshamn reactors will be after their upgrades. The Oskarshamn powerplant operational since the early 1970s are beeing upgraded and the power output is increased. The output of the second reactor in operation since 1975 will be increased by 28 %, from 660 MW to about 850 MW (electric power). The third reactor built in 1985 has also been upgraded and is after the increased output now worlds largest BWR-type reactor 3900 MW thermal power and about 1450 MW electric power. Experts as Frigyes Reisch (former member of IAEA) are concerned that this increases the risk of a meltdown.



posted on Mar, 26 2011 @ 02:29 PM
link   

Originally posted by Teknetium
I wonder how safe the Swedish Oskarshamn reactors will be after their upgrades. The Oskarshamn powerplant operational since the early 1970s are beeing upgraded and the power output is increased. The output of the second reactor in operation since 1975 will be increased by 28 %, from 660 MW to about 850 MW (electric power). The third reactor built in 1985 has also been upgraded and is after the increased output now worlds largest BWR-type reactor 3900 MW thermal power and about 1450 MW electric power. Experts as Frigyes Reisch (former member of IAEA) are concerned that this increases the risk of a meltdown.


How was power increased? MOX?



posted on Mar, 26 2011 @ 02:30 PM
link   
If the land on which the plant sits has "sunk" as a result of the quake, being so close to the ocean in the first place, would that mean that any aquifer under the plant would have, in effect, "risen"?

That would potentially bring the reactor core(s) closer to the aquifer below each core. If a given core were to "melt down", it would be even more likely that a steam explosion would result; the "core catcher" safety systems, could themselves already be underwater, rendering them completely useless.

In fact, the only thing the core cather would do in such a circumstance would be to ensure that the molten core (the corium, is it?) remained in a position to contaminate the circulating waters of the aquifer.

Could this be a contributing factor in the high radiation figures we are seeing in the seawater?


It is possible that the TEPCO officials/workers at the plant realized the immenent danger resulting from this "elevation adjustment" soon after the quake; it might explain some of their, seemingly counter-intuative actions, don't you think?


I wonder if TEPCO has reason to be concerned that either the sea level, or the underlying aquifer might be on the rise again/still?

What happens if, for example, the auquifer under the plant rises to a level, putting even still intact reactor cores in, or even, under water?



posted on Mar, 26 2011 @ 02:32 PM
link   
english.kyodonews.jp...

I couldn't help but laugh at this article - finally a solution to illegal immigrants - catastrophic nuclear meltdown


"Police on Saturday arrested a 48-year-old Chinese man, who turned himself in to Nagasaki prefectural police seeking deportation due to his fears about the nuclear accident at the Fukushima Daiichi power station, for illegally staying in Japan, police officials said.

Lin Jian Ming is suspected of remaining in Japan beyond the allowed period of 90 days after arriving on June 8, 2000, the officials said."



posted on Mar, 26 2011 @ 02:42 PM
link   
reply to post by PresumedInnocent
 


I don't know much about their politics but will there be a Japan left to hold an election?



posted on Mar, 26 2011 @ 02:45 PM
link   

Originally posted by mrbillshow

How was power increased? MOX?


The poer is increased by increased rate of fission. It is the same amount of fuel, because it cannot be loaded by more fuel rods so in order to increase the power the fuel is consumed at a faster rate. This is achieved by altering the control rods. The company that runs the plant "OKG" has permit to load the reactors with MOX-fuel. However I am not shure if MOX-fuel is required to increase the output.



posted on Mar, 26 2011 @ 02:50 PM
link   

Originally posted by predator0187
What did they so in Chernobyl that turned the fuel into a less radioactive? Was that the sand drenched with boron?


The fuel did it itself... as it turned to nuclear lava it melted through the reactor, and melted the casing holding the sand barrier around the reactor. That sand mixed with the lava and vitrified( turned into glass) You need to see the NOVA documentary about how this happened.

The radioactivity is still there... actually its 10,000 roetgens /hour at the surface of the glass/fuel mix. And as the glass breaks down, water will again be able to start it all over, if they don't get that new cover built in time. They need a cover that will outlast the pyramids... about 100,000 years they say

I highly recommend everyone watch the two Chernobyl docs... the one after the event and the one where they went back to find out why the fuel stopped emitting...

This post is the info on the molten fuel

www.abovetopsecret.com...



posted on Mar, 26 2011 @ 02:50 PM
link   
Germany Nuclear Power Protest Draws 200,000


Protesters shouted "Fukushima, Chernobyl: Too much is too much!" or "Switch them off," urging the government to shut down the country's 17 reactors for good. They also held a minute of silence to remember the victims of Japan's March 11 earthquake and tsunami.



posted on Mar, 26 2011 @ 02:54 PM
link   

Originally posted by TheRedneck
Thank you! Between you and zorgon, I just saved a few gallons of gas.



I bet if you google your plant there will be pics online somewhere



posted on Mar, 26 2011 @ 02:57 PM
link   

Originally posted by Bhadhidar
That would potentially bring the reactor core(s) closer to the aquifer below each core. If a given core were to "melt down", it would be even more likely that a steam explosion would result; the "core catcher" safety systems, could themselves already be underwater, rendering them completely useless.


Since they are only a few meters away from and above sea level there wouldn't be an aquifer as such... but the water table in that area would be close to sea level... so not very deep at all

Remember that video taken during the quake on that area that was land fill? The water was squirting out of the cracks in the ground



posted on Mar, 26 2011 @ 03:00 PM
link   

Originally posted by zorgon

Originally posted by TheRedneck
Thank you! Between you and zorgon, I just saved a few gallons of gas.



I bet if you google your plant there will be pics online somewhere


Try googling "schematic plus your plant location" I think all schematics for plants are online.
edit on 26-3-2011 by Destinyone because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 26 2011 @ 03:00 PM
link   

Originally posted by checkmeout
"Police on Saturday arrested a 48-year-old Chinese man, who turned himself in to Nagasaki prefectural police seeking deportation due to his fears about the nuclear accident at the Fukushima Daiichi power station, for illegally staying in Japan, police officials said.


And he wants a free ticket out of there. I would put him on the clean up crew



posted on Mar, 26 2011 @ 03:01 PM
link   
Not exactly an impartial perspective, however has some interesting observations on what it is like on the ground a few kms from the plant. I wish they would report the Sv readings they are getting...




As we found out today, the radiation levels are high in Fukushima city -- our measurements confirmed levels that have been reported in newspapers and by the government -- in some places so high that you would get your "maximum annual dose" (if you believe in such things) in about 8 days. It's a bit strange to see people biking and going about their business.




We kept our measurement gear on, but we had to turn off the audio bleeps on the Geiger counter, its constant sound was driving us nuts. The alarms of the devices can't be turned off, and in particularly high radiation areas they'd all go off. There was one place we hit such a high reading that we didn't even stop there. It was windy and dry, and the dust and snow can carry radioactive particles. So if you step out of the car and get dust or snow on you, you might bring radioactive particles into the car and you don't want that. We moved on quickly.





My biggest impression of the day was that this is a truly beautiful place – the mountains are breathtaking, and if you don't look at the Geiger counters, it's quite a nice place to be. But you look at the Geiger counters and you realise there's a danger, and that you can't see it with your eyes.


Blog from Greenpeace radiation monitors on the ground around Fukusima plant.
edit on 26-3-2011 by Wertwog because: another snippet added



posted on Mar, 26 2011 @ 03:04 PM
link   
reply to post by zorgon
 


That's some crazy stuff, I always thought it had something to do with the boron sand mixture.

Can you give me the names of the 2 documentaries you were talking about would love to watch them.

Thanks for the replies...


Pred...



posted on Mar, 26 2011 @ 03:07 PM
link   
Parts of Fukushima prefecture reports subsidence of up to 75 cm (2½ feet), with some parts having dropped below sea level.


According to the GPS data, crustal movements associated with this event were observed and there were movements of approximately 4.4m toward the east-southeast at the Shizugawa observation point (Miyagi prefecture). In addition, on the coast from Iwate through Fukushima prefectures, the maximum subsidence of approximately 75cm was observed. There are the regions that keep inundated after the tsunami ceased.


www.jishin.go.jp...




top topics



 
513
<< 350  351  352    354  355  356 >>

log in

join