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Japan declares 'nuclear emergency' after quake

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posted on Mar, 25 2011 @ 04:06 PM
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For some reason this article makes me angry
.


Injured Japan atom workers to be released soon-IAEA



The men, battling to cool one of the most critical reactors at the plant on Thursday, and a colleague were exposed to radiation levels 10,000 times higher than expected


They have repeatedly told us that they are unsure of the situation so surely there would be a chance that levels may be "higher than expected"?


"According to the data we got from (Japan) they will be most likely discharged on Monday. From my medical perspective if they got something serious they wouldn't be discharged on Monday,"


This statement is so stupid I'm not going to even comment on it.


He said it was also an exaggeration to describe the injuries the men sustained on their feet as burns, although it was clear they had been contaminated.


So what exactly was it that happened to their legs? Some minor radioactive singeing?


The subcontractors, who had been working in a turbine hall, are believed to have ignored the alarms on their radiation monitoring equipment.

"The conditions within the place they were working changed," IAEA official Elena Buglova said. "The dose rates before were lower ... (and they) assumed it was a false alarm."


So they are working in an environment with a nuclear meltdown occurring, and they decide to ignore the alarms when radiation "10,000 times higher than expected" blasts them? Why on earth would they do that? Did Tepco hire completely untrained imbeciles to save the country from a nuclear meltdown?



If they are telling the truth...

1) It's Tepco's fault if the men were not properly prepared for the high radiation! They are in charge of the situation.

2) It's Tepco's fault if the men really did believe their alarms were false readings - again they should have been better prepared/trained!

3) The powers that be shouldn't blame the poor guys who have risked their lives to help their country - it's so disrespectful.


If they are lying...

1) The powers that be shouldn't blame the poor guys who have risked their lives to help their country - it's so disrespectful!

Source




edit on 25-3-2011 by Moonbeams771 because: (no reason given)




posted on Mar, 25 2011 @ 04:09 PM
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Originally posted by mrbillshow


Make no mistake, these disclosures from unamed people as well as the quotes in the NYT article are planned and manipulated releases of information from Tepco and the JapGuv.


A very good point. Quite impossible to have a look at the vessel. They want us to think this is "just" a crack as the core is smouldering on the floor.



THEREDNEC: Your outfit is OK, it was carbon capture and storage I ment. Especially a technique called oxyfuel where you burn some carbon with pure oxygene, so the exhaust is almost solely CO2. Then it is liquefied and pumped half a kilometer underground for final deposition. It's heavier than water and stays liquid in the pressure down there so it won't escape.

Theoretical energy loss is only 5% when you have to liquefy the air first, to get oxygen and nitrogen separated. Nitrogen part is used to cool the carbon dioxide. Practical energy loss is also low, 10%. The fossiles are going to be burned anyway, so let's do it properly then! Downsides are the same as with nuclear (expensive technology and the need for final deposition) - only smaller.

One of this kind is already up and running in Germany.

edit on 25-3-2011 by Styrge because: tpyo



posted on Mar, 25 2011 @ 04:13 PM
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Seems to me they have been playing a very lethal game of Whack-A-Mole

And it seems they've been surprised to have a few of these moles come up and bight them in the arse!



posted on Mar, 25 2011 @ 04:18 PM
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reply to post by Moonbeams771
 


I made a post about the these "subcontracted" workers many pages back..

The truth is..they are considered in many cases to be "disposable workers"
Not given the training they need..nor equipment..just a job to do..


many of the workers exposed to radiation in nuclear accidents over the years have been subcontracted workers who are often hired to do the dirtiest and most dangerous work in the nuclear industry



According to data from Japan’s Nuclear Safety Commission, of the 71,376 Japanese who are employed in the nuclear power industry, 63,420, or almost 89%, work for subcontractors. It is these employees who receive more than 90% of all radiation exposure.



The workers at the bottom of the socioeconomic food chain–including those allegedly hired by the day from skid rows–receive the least safety education and the highest radiation doses


Source

So nope It would not shock me to learn there is more to this story than we are being told.....



posted on Mar, 25 2011 @ 04:21 PM
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reply to post by Fractured.Facade

MOX fuel increases the heat, the radiation, and the uncertainty... all at the same time. We know that MOX fuel will be worse, but how much worse and in what way... well, looks like we get to find out.

TheRedneck



posted on Mar, 25 2011 @ 04:30 PM
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Originally posted by TheRedneck
reply to post by Fractured.Facade

MOX fuel increases the heat, the radiation, and the uncertainty... all at the same time. We know that MOX fuel will be worse, but how much worse and in what way... well, looks like we get to find out.

TheRedneck


So, maybe a safe guess to say that it was no coincidence that #3 (MOX fueled) was the first to explode from hydrogen buildup, early in this disaster, hours or more ahead of the other reactors with major problems... And now may have a cracked pressure vessel, so if this one goes full meltdown, the others will possibly follow within hours.

I think the environmental impact from this MOX fueled reactor will be the worst from this entire disaster.



posted on Mar, 25 2011 @ 04:32 PM
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reply to post by Moonbeams771
 



I found a quote in a article about the radiation at japan's power plants in the past that pretty much sums up this entire mess.....!!!!!!!



The words of a person in charge of safety control of the site, "You have been commendably irradiated,,, praising a worker who had been exposed to 90 millirem of radiation exceeding the 30_millirem capacity of his alarm meter

source


They have all been Commendably irradiated



posted on Mar, 25 2011 @ 04:33 PM
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Xenon-133 and Iodine-131 detected in Germany at microbecquerel level, so extremely diluted.

translate.google.com/translate?sl=de&tl=en&u=http://www.bfs.de/en/bfs/presse/pr11/pm03.html&act=url


The monitoring station of the BfS on the Schauinsland near Freiburg low concentrations of xenon-133 and iodine-131 recorded in the micro-Becquerel area in the atmosphere (Iodine: 60 micro-Becquerel per cubic meter of air).


odlinfo.bfs.de gives microSievert/hour readings.



posted on Mar, 25 2011 @ 04:33 PM
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reply to post by Moonbeams771

I doubt they had any indication of the extreme level of radiation, at least until their ankles seemed to burst into flame (radiation burns are extremely painful). It sounds like their dosimeters went off almost immediately and they thought it was a malfunction because they had been told the situation was orders of magnitude less dangerous than it actually was.

Dosimeters are like the 'idiot lights' on cars... they might say "stop engine now", but give no further information. Dosimeters say something like "dosage exceeded", but they don't say how much it was exceeded.

TheRedneck



posted on Mar, 25 2011 @ 04:35 PM
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Originally posted by kemicar
www.nisa.meti.go.jp...


Redneck, look at this official report of radioactive nuclides found in the puddle.
The list include CI 38 which has a half life of 37 minutes and it's only found via neutron activation of Cl-37 or, if I understand correctly via a working fission chain reaction
edit on 25-3-2011 by monica86 because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 25 2011 @ 04:37 PM
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reply to post by Fractured.Facade

I believe, and have believed for a few hundred pages now, that the explosion from #3 ruptured #2, and that the intensity of that explosion was due to the MOX fuel being used.

So.... yes.

TheRedneck



posted on Mar, 25 2011 @ 04:37 PM
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Originally posted by TheRedneck
reply to post by butcherguy

OK, that makes sense then that they would find molybdenum, including Mo-99 from neutron bombardment, in the water. but it does indicate a reactor vessel breach, simply because this is more evidence that the water in the turbine room originally came from within the RPV itself. Otherwise, it would still be there!

If water is leaking out of a vessel, it is simply a pretty safe bet that the vessel contains a hole for the water to leak out of.

TheRedneck


Yeah I concur. The vessels were forged by Japan Steel Works out of ASME/ASTM SA/A503 CL.3 ingot. JSW Nuclear RPV Forgings - down towards the bottom of the page
Per my UNS book: A503 Cl.3 = UNS K12042

C: 0.25 Max.
Cr: 0.25 Max.
Mn: 1.20-1.50
Mo: 0.45-0.60
Ni: 0.40-1.00
P: 0.025 Max.
S: 0.025 Max.
Si: 0.15-0.40
V: 0.01-0.10

So there would be your Mo. The Co...well you guess as to the location would make sense to me.



posted on Mar, 25 2011 @ 04:38 PM
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If anyone has an idea, what are the chances of an occurrence of the "China Syndrome" in a sense that the molten reactor core breaching the Earth's crust? Would something of this nature create tectonic instability creating more severe aftershocks?


I honestly trust the information coming from this thread rather than any international and especially domestic media outlets.



posted on Mar, 25 2011 @ 04:39 PM
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reply to post by Moonbeams771
 


Hi guys, quite a while since I've posted here but it's still a great thread and I check through the latest regularly.

As is typical of this story, I am coming across news on what's happening in a piecemeal fashion, so please forgive me if I have misread the situation, but...

[These workers who received "10,000" times normal dose - is there a recorded correlation (time/reactor #) with the "10,000" times normal levels water reports?

Could it be that where TEPCO say that the workers "situation changed" could be that they were in the reactor site whilst some kind of water purge/pump was activated (on either a reactor or fuel rod pool) - or even to fascilitate it; then water pooled at their feet/floor, and in the darkness/confusion they failed to initially notice that said water was in fact coming not from external sources (hose/roof/helicopter deposits) but leaking/exiting the radioactive hazard/container? *]

[*Sorry, just got to the NYT article - all is revealed!]
edit on 25-3-2011 by curioustype because: Corrected to acknowledge/reflect earlier post/source/data)


reg

posted on Mar, 25 2011 @ 04:43 PM
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Just wanted to give you guys (and gals) keeping us up to date on the situation in Japan.


I havn't seen this mentioned all week on the TV/radio here in the U.K, they seemed to have found something better to report on with Libya. Pretty pathetic really how they have the power to decide what news we get to hear about, Thank god for ATS.



posted on Mar, 25 2011 @ 04:47 PM
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reply to post by mistafaz
 



The China Syndrome is a term that describes a fictitious result of a severe nuclear meltdown in which molten reactor core components penetrate their containment vessel and building. However the term is misleading, since molten material from such an event could not melt through the crust of the Earth and reach China.

en.wikipedia.org...

We have to remember that this is only a theory. It is not proven that it could happen. It didn't happen in Chernobyl. But I do not think we need to jump to that conclusion.

I personally think and this is my own opinion that "The China Syndrome" was concocted for the sake of fear mongering. A good scare tactic for a case against nuclear power.



posted on Mar, 25 2011 @ 04:53 PM
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I need to ask a question, please if someone here can answer it, that would be great.

I found this report this morning and have been trying to understand it. Would someone here mind to explain. I know the values are probably not alarming, but it has troubled me all today.






Orginal PDF



posted on Mar, 25 2011 @ 04:55 PM
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reply to post by mrbillshow
 

I think the donation is both highly symbolic and extremely significant, because any public act by the Emperor outside of "planned" activities and events is always significant to the Japanese.

This gift of food is a further indication from the Emperor that everyone will need to offer help and share what they have. The fact that the Emperor has done this also indicates to his people that there is no shame in accepting such help, because by following the Emperor's example they cannot possibly be seen as doing something that is either incorrect or a matter of shame to either party.

This is important because of the strong sense of obligation and being in debt if helped. If the one helped feels unable to repay the debt, then it can be shameful to accept and effectively place one's self under endless obligation to another. The giver also may know this and feel ashamed to place the other in the position of feeling indebted. It's complicated but that's about the size of it. The Emperor has relieved this problem by what he gave, because of course, most people are in no position to repay something directly to him and so he would have implied that he forgives them this obligation. Therefore, others may also do the same and for both parties, no inner disharmony will follow.

The Emperor's further involvement in this way is also an indication of how dire this situation really is. It's not really about this relatively small amount of food, but more a way for the Emperor to help to guide the people to the realization that the current crisis is far, far worse than they had even imagined.

But there is another level to this as well: this food came from the Emperor's own ranch. It is effectively farm produce. So, he is also saying to them: "This food is from my own land. Would I give you tainted food that would otherwise be served at my own table? Not all farm produce is tainted. But we must work to preserve and protect what we have."

I guess we could boil down the whole message in his actions and put it this way: "Ukiyo wa kokoro shidai." This means: "The transient world is what we wish it to be." In other words, we can (still) do a great deal to affect what is happening in the world around us. But change requires will, it requires action, and (because of the "we") it requires us to work together.

EDIT to add: Sorry, I meant to include this statement that you quoted in your post:

93 people from Fukushima, one of the hardest-hit prefectures, are now living there.


That is very, very telling indeed.

(End of edit)

Best regards,

Mike

edit on 25/3/11 by JustMike because: Added an ETA



posted on Mar, 25 2011 @ 04:58 PM
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Originally posted by TheRedneck
reply to post by Moonbeams771

I doubt they had any indication of the extreme level of radiation, at least until their ankles seemed to burst into flame (radiation burns are extremely painful). It sounds like their dosimeters went off almost immediately and they thought it was a malfunction because they had been told the situation was orders of magnitude less dangerous than it actually was.

Dosimeters are like the 'idiot lights' on cars... they might say "stop engine now", but give no further information. Dosimeters say something like "dosage exceeded", but they don't say how much it was exceeded.

TheRedneck


What's the point of wearing a dosimeter if they are going to ignore them? Surely they were set to warn the workers that the safe level had been exceeded (and that now was the time to get out)? If a warning light tells you to stop the engine now, you stop to check first, and then relax if it's a false alarm.

Am I wrong to think that it's likely that workers may have been routinely ignoring their dosimeters?




edit on 25-3-2011 by Moonbeams771 because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 25 2011 @ 04:59 PM
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reply to post by monica86
 


You are right - "chlorine-38 may be produced by irradiating chlorine with neutrons". Given the high concentration and the extremely short half life, I'd say this water came straight from a hot fission reaction. I agree that this is hard proof that criticality has been reached, and that this critical fission reaction is not contained by either the core or outer containment system.

books.google.com... TdDwNJOssAPa6eT-CA&sa=X&oi=book_result&ct=result&resnum=3&ved=0CCIQ6AEwAjgK#v=onepage&q=Chlorine-38&f=false




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