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Japan declares 'nuclear emergency' after quake

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posted on Mar, 25 2011 @ 08:49 AM
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reply to post by JustMike
 


I did a 'reply to' tweet to him to see if I could get a clarification. As it is now late in Japan, I don't know when/if he will see it.

I too will send an inquiry to VOA about the 100,000 number. Maybe if they get enough emails, they'll respond.




posted on Mar, 25 2011 @ 09:19 AM
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Originally posted by Ev0luti0nist
Another strong quake in Japan today
earthquake.usgs.gov...

when do they stop calling these aftershocks

When they stop for a while. Why does it matter what they call them?



posted on Mar, 25 2011 @ 09:27 AM
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reply to post by Ev0luti0nist
 



Originally posted by ns9504
Hi all - I answered this question on another thread, but earthquake related info so I'm reposting here (hope that's ok)

Originally posted by Ryanssuperman
www.abovetopsecret.com...

"I'm just looking for an explanation as to why Japan is still getting quakes, as strong as 6.6, 13 days (and counting) after the 9.2? Are these aftershocks? Do aftershocks usually last this long for a quake of this magnitude?"

----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

An answer from my dad, seismologist with the USGS:

After shocks:
After a main EQ (the 9.0 in the case of Japan's recent big one), the plates involved continue to adjust to their new states of stress. These adjustments cause more earthquakes--the aftershocks. All other things being equal, and on average, there are lots of aftershocks at first then they slowly die off with time. The falloff is commonly exponential (same formulas as for compound interest only in reverse).

Again on average, within a year of the main EQ, the fault will produce one EQ, one magnitude less than the main EQ. So Northeast Japan could expect an after shock as large as M8, which might cause a smaller Tsunami.

10 aftershocks two magnitudes less (M7)

And 100 aftershocks as large as M6.

and so on down the magnitude scale.


From here.

Short answer is yes, these aftershocks are normal activity.

Now if quakes along a separate fault line start up, or increase in existing activity then we might want to start worrying about another large quake.

TrueAmerican has an excellent thread here about that possibility.


edit on 25-3-2011 by jadedANDcynical because: Typo



posted on Mar, 25 2011 @ 09:32 AM
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The New Scientist has a very interesting article claiming that "Fukushima radioactive fallout nears Chernobyl levels".


Japan's damaged nuclear plant in Fukushima has been emitting radioactive iodine and caesium at levels approaching those seen in the aftermath of the Chernobyl accident in 1986. Austrian researchers have used a worldwide network of radiation detectors – designed to spot clandestine nuclear bomb tests – to show that iodine-131 is being released at daily levels 73 per cent of those seen after the 1986 disaster. The daily amount of caesium-137 released from Fukushima Daiichi is around 60 per cent of the amount released from Chernobyl.


Source



posted on Mar, 25 2011 @ 09:39 AM
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Originally posted by AstraCat
BTW, can anybody explain what is the point of bringing fresh water for reactors from USA by sea?
Aren't there any closer sources of fresh water?

I think the answer is that on the surface, there is no point at all: clearly, even if they should be using "distilled" (demineralized) water and not just ordinary fresh water, there have to be enough places in Japan that could supply whatever is needed. Certainly, the Japanese government could requisition all available supplies of distilled water. It's a national emergency, after all. In that case I would expect they could source hundreds or thousands of tons if necessary.

So why did the US make the offer of something that isn't really needed?

I think the US made this offer to Japan not because they (the Japanese) need it. The US government knows they don't. No, it was offered because the US wants to make it clear that their experts and those in other countries strongly disapprove of this method of pumping sea water over, around and possibly into those damaged reactors and making things far, far worse. This offer is an indirect way of voicing that disapproval and of telling the Japanese experts to stop using sea water and start doing things the right way.

On the same basis, the offer of military support is also a sideways suggestion that the Japanese should be using more military personnel in this crisis. The US basically said:

"Your civilians in charge are clueless, they're screwing this up, they're potentially turning a limited catastrophe into armageddon for your nation. Get some people in there who know how to use a chain of command and who know how to plan for all contingencies and who will get a plan in place and act on it quickly. We know you don't want our military in there and taking care of this for you. It would be a massive loss of face to your nation. So use your military while you still have a chance!"

The Japanese must have military who are trained to deal with radioactive contamination issues. And more than that, I bet the military standards of protection for their personnel would be higher than the frankly appalling "safety standards" that TEPCO has been allowing. They let workers into a building without testing the radiation levels first? I mean, if a military CO did that it would be a court martial at the very least!

In fact I'd go so far as to say that TEPCO should have no part at all in managing this crisis from here on in. It's fundamentally become a defense issue for Japan now, as it's quite literally a matter of national security.

I am in no way criticizing the actions of the workers who have gone into those nuclear plants or even worked near them. In fact, I am in awe of them and they have my utmost respect. However I am sickened by the lapses in security and safety that have placed the lives of these people in terrible peril, I am disgusted by the demonstrated ineptitude of those who are supposed to be "in charge" -- did they take lessons in stupidity? -- and I am in fear of what still may lie in wait for these courageous but suffering and tormented human beings who are just like us, who need leaders who will lead, leaders who have plans that can be actioned, and leaders who will action them and stop this messing around and endless deceit!

Mike

edit on 25/3/11 by JustMike because: typos



posted on Mar, 25 2011 @ 09:44 AM
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reply to post by DancedWithWolves
 


I really hope I am nope seeing what my brain tells me I am. It almost looks like, deck shoes, flippers, and non almond eyes.



posted on Mar, 25 2011 @ 09:50 AM
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was this video posted before?
www3.nhk.or.jp...

It should be the latest view of the reactors.



posted on Mar, 25 2011 @ 09:52 AM
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Originally posted by JustMike

Originally posted by AstraCat
BTW, can anybody explain what is the point of bringing fresh water for reactors from USA by sea?
Aren't there any closer sources of fresh water?

I think the answer is that on the surface, there is no point at all: clearly, even if they should be using "distilled" (demineralized) water and not just ordinary fresh water, there have to be enough places in Japan that could supply whatever is needed. Certainly, the Japanese government could requisition all available supplies of distilled water. It's a national emergency, after all. In that case I would expect they could source hundreds or thousands of tons if necessary.

So why did the US make the offer of something that isn't really needed?

I think the US made this offer to Japan not because they (they Japanese) need it. The US government knows they don't. No, it was offered because the US wants to make it clear that their experts and those in other countries strongly disapprove of this method of pumping sea water over, around and possibly into those damaged reactors and making things far, far worse. This offer is an indirect way of voicing that disapproval and of telling the Japanese experts to stop using sea water and start doing things the right way.

On the same basis, the offer of military support is also a sideways suggestion that the Japanese should be using more military personnel in this crisis. The US basically said:

"Your civilians in charge are clueless, they're screwing this up, they're potentially turning a limited catastrophe into armageddon for your nation. Get some people in there who know how to use a chain of command and who know how to plan for all contingencies and who will get a plan in place and act on it quickly. We know you don't want our military in there and taking care of this for you. It would be a massive loss of face to your nation. So use your military while you still have a chance!"

The Japanese must have military who are trained to deal with radioactive contamination issues. And more than that, I bet the military standards of protection for their personnel would be higher than the frankly appalling "safety standards" that TEPCO has been allowing. They let workers into a building without testing the radiation levels first? I mean, if a military CO did that it would be a court martial at the very least!

In fact I'd go so far as to say that TEPCO should have no part at all in managing this crisis from here on in. It's fundamentally become a defense issue for Japan now, as it's quite literally a matter of national security.

I am in no way criticizing the actions of the workers who have gone into those nuclear plants or even worked near them. In fact, I am in awe of them and they have my utmost respect. However I am sickened by the lapses in security and safety that have placed the lives of these people in terrible peril, I am disgusted by the demonstrated ineptitude of those who are supposed to be "in charge" -- did they take lessons in stupidity? -- and I am in fear of what still may lie in wait for these courageous but suffering and tormented human beings who are just like us, who need leaders who will lead, leaders who have plans that can be actioned, and leaders who will action them and stop this messing around and endless deceit!

Mike

edit on 25/3/11 by JustMike because: typos


Well put, they should be forgetting about face, man up and get the job done, with who ever can do it. It is not about ego, ego got them into trouble the last time. Its about getting a solution and saving their people, if they don't the world might end up with a whole lot more refugees. Which there are all ready, to many of.

edit on 25-3-2011 by marsend because: sentence structure read ability, typos



posted on Mar, 25 2011 @ 09:52 AM
link   

Originally posted by JustMike

Originally posted by AstraCat
BTW, can anybody explain what is the point of bringing fresh water for reactors from USA by sea?
Aren't there any closer sources of fresh water?

I think the answer is that on the surface, there is no point at all: clearly, even if they should be using "distilled" (demineralized) water and not just ordinary fresh water, there have to be enough places in Japan that could supply whatever is needed. Certainly, the Japanese government could requisition all available supplies of distilled water. It's a national emergency, after all. In that case I would expect they could source hundreds or thousands of tons if necessary.

So why did the US make the offer of something that isn't really needed?

I think the US made this offer to Japan not because they (they Japanese) need it. The US government knows they don't. No, it was offered because the US wants to make it clear that their experts and those in other countries strongly disapprove of this method of pumping sea water over, around and possibly into those damaged reactors and making things far, far worse. This offer is an indirect way of voicing that disapproval and of telling the Japanese experts to stop using sea water and start doing things the right way.

On the same basis, the offer of military support is also a sideways suggestion that the Japanese should be using more military personnel in this crisis. The US basically said:

"Your civilians in charge are clueless, they're screwing this up, they're potentially turning a limited catastrophe into armageddon for your nation. Get some people in there who know how to use a chain of command and who know how to plan for all contingencies and who will get a plan in place and act on it quickly. We know you don't want our military in there and taking care of this for you. It would be a massive loss of face to your nation. So use your military while you still have a chance!"

The Japanese must have military who are trained to deal with radioactive contamination issues. And more than that, I bet the military standards of protection for their personnel would be higher than the frankly appalling "safety standards" that TEPCO has been allowing. They let workers into a building without testing the radiation levels first? I mean, if a military CO did that it would be a court martial at the very least!

In fact I'd go so far as to say that TEPCO should have no part at all in managing this crisis from here on in. It's fundamentally become a defense issue for Japan now, as it's quite literally a matter of national security.

I am in no way criticizing the actions of the workers who have gone into those nuclear plants or even worked near them. In fact, I am in awe of them and they have my utmost respect. However I am sickened by the lapses in security and safety that have placed the lives of these people in terrible peril, I am disgusted by the demonstrated ineptitude of those who are supposed to be "in charge" -- did they take lessons in stupidity? -- and I am in fear of what still may lie in wait for these courageous but suffering and tormented human beings who are just like us, who need leaders who will lead, leaders who have plans that can be actioned, and leaders who will action them and stop this messing around and endless deceit!

Mike

edit on 25/3/11 by JustMike because: typos


Well put, they should be forgetting about face, man up and get the job done, it is not about ego, ego got them into trouble the last time. Its about getting a solution and saving their people, if they don't the world might end up with a whole lot more refugees. Which there are all ready, to many of.



posted on Mar, 25 2011 @ 09:55 AM
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Is it just me? In all the videos and photos posted, I've not seen a single high tech radiation suit, remember, the ones (200), donated early last week by Radiation Shield Technologies, from Florida.www.radshield.com...

What do you want to bet, those are tucked away in some hidey holes, of some high ranking Tepco execs....

Makes me sick and very angry!

Des



posted on Mar, 25 2011 @ 09:56 AM
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www.asiaone.com/News/Latest%2BNews/Asia/Story/A1Story20110325-270077.html

AFP - Fukushima shutdown could take one month: TEPCO


OSAKA - Fukushima nuclear plant operator TEPCO on Friday said it may take a month to achieve cold shutdown, as Japan mulled hiking the crisis to a notch under Chernobyl on an atomic accident scale.

The Nuclear and Industrial Safety Agency (NISA) currently rates Fukushima at 5 out of 7, making it the worst ever in Japan, putting it on the same level as the 1979 accident at Three Mile Island in Pennsylvania.

Tokyo Electric Power Co (TEPCO) admitted Friday it may take at least another month to achieve a cold shutdown of all reactors - when temperatures inside fall below boiling point and its cooling systems are back at atmospheric pressure.

"We are still in the process of assessing the damage at the plant, so we can't put a deadline on when the cooling operations will work again. It may take more than a month, who knows," a TEPCO spokesman told AFP.

(...)



posted on Mar, 25 2011 @ 09:57 AM
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reply to post by JustMike
 


You, sir, have an incisive and analytical assessment of the situation that is as clear and concise as ANY I've come across. I am continuously impressed at your abiliy to discern the meaning in all of these directly indirect statements that the media is FAILING to properly weigh.

I could not agree more with your attribution of blame to those in charge of the situation. They were handed a FUBAR beyond comprehension in that quake, but they have mishandled it grossly. Hen we find out that safety inspections were missed/forged. It's no wonder that problems are greater than anticipated. It's passed the time when someone else needs to be given the power to make things happen.

The plants were designing with only a 7.5 in mind as a maximum, what they experienced was a bit more than that. It was nearly a million times more powerful than the plant was engineered for. I don't know if you could realistically design and build a structure that is able to withstand the energy of a 9.0 quake.

No one really knows what to do because no one has imagined this in the first place. We are watching something unthinkable only a few weeks ago.

It's much worse than a bad movie because it's really happening. This is not one I would pay to see but am currently transfixed as this is world changing on so many levels that it's difficult to grasp tue gravity of the situation. I am extremely thankful for those of you on this site that have taken it upon yourselves to track down and report thisninformation and also for the level of discourse that has allowed me to feel as though I am not alone in my concern.



posted on Mar, 25 2011 @ 10:03 AM
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reply to post by jadedANDcynical
 


The company executives should have their next executive meeting there. Some one / group should be charged with crimes against humanity. They earn enough, why not have penalties to suit. I read once, for the small crimes you get the bars, but for the big ones you get a plaque. And these days possibly a pay rise as well.



posted on Mar, 25 2011 @ 10:04 AM
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On the Numerology front the 2nd of april look auspicious.

For you americans the day is written first.and zero is not a number


2 + 4 + 2 + 1+1 = 10 so the number is 1

Now every letter has its number in numerology, so fukushima will read as follows.


F= 6 U = 3 K = 2 U = 3 S = 1 H = 8 I = 9 M = 4 A = 1 total = 37 and 3 + 7 = 10 = 1

Now take the word Nuclear and read its number.


N = 5 U = 3 C = 3 L = 3 E = 5 A = 1 R = 9 total = 29 2+9 = 11 as the number 11 is a master number it stays the same


Now the word Explosive.


E = 5 X = 6 P = 7 L = 3 O = 6 S = 1 I = 9 V = 4 E = 5 total = 46 so 4 + 6 = 10 or 1


And so there seems to be words and dates ending in the number 1 , does numerology fortell the future, well we only have a few days to waite for that answer,



posted on Mar, 25 2011 @ 10:04 AM
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reply to post by jjjtir
 


What's not being said:
"We are still in the process of assessing the damage at the plant, so we can't put a deadline on when the cooling operations will work again. It may take more than a month, who knows," a TEPCO spokesman told AFP.

We REALLY don't know how bad it is.
Source


Who knows?!

?!!

You have got to be kidding me!

Much much worse than a bad movie.

edit on 25-3-2011 by jadedANDcynical because: Sourced



posted on Mar, 25 2011 @ 10:05 AM
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Why does the rating of this reactor matter?

We will not know the truth about it until long after everything has been said and done. They have lied from the beginning and taken a birch of missteps, of course they are going to cover up their mistakes.

I could care less what it is rated at because we will not get the proper rating, or proper rating of radiation for year. And then and only then can we truly assess the situation properly.

Pred...



posted on Mar, 25 2011 @ 10:10 AM
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reply to post by JustMike
 



Yes, I nominate that post for an applause. Those workers going in there and sacrificing there lives like that.They must have tremendous faith in those running the operation. I would jump at the chance to die with the honor that
they deserve. However, if the workers faith is misplaced, then their sacrifice won't even be honored. It is in vain.

Good one Mike



posted on Mar, 25 2011 @ 10:13 AM
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Another report about the puddle incident.
They thought the dosimeter was out of order
They stayed in the water 50 minutes and we know that the water measurement were 400 mSv per hour...
Very conveniently though the official in charge of measuring radiation level was missing....

www.asahi.com...


" I thought (the dosemeter) was out of order," one of the workers was quoted as saying. The radioactivity level had been low in the basement before. TEPCO has come under fire for failing to properly ensure the safety of the workers trying to bring the nuclear crisis under control. The company has acknowledged that its safety measures were inadequate. .



The workers' dosemeters showed radiation amounts totaling 173 to 180 millisieverts, less than the maximum of 250 millisieverts per year allowed for an emergency situation. But the level at the water's surface was later found to be 400 millisieverts per hour.The workers wore three layers of protective clothing, masks, helmets and gloves. But TEPCO gave them no instructions about their footwear because there were no deep water puddles the previous day. The workers in ordinary work shoes were in the contaminated water for 40 to 50 minutes, and the tainted water had soaked through their clothes to their skin, according to officials.



Industry minister Banri Kaieda criticized TEPCO for the absence of the official in charge of measuring radiation levels



The company was trying to determine where the water came from. According to TEPCO and the Nuclear and Industrial Safety Agency (NISA), the water was found with 3.9 million becquerels of radioactive substances per cubic centimeter, about 10,000 times the level of water used to cool reactor cores. Cobalt-60, iodine-131, cesium-137 and other substances, which do not normally exist in cooling water, were detected, the officials said[


Ah and they claim they are investigating if the water came from an overflow of the Spent Fuel Pool...
That sounds like BS to me. For one because I understood that there is no I131 in spent fuel as it would have already decayed


edit on 25-3-2011 by monica86 because: (no reason given)

edit on 25-3-2011 by monica86 because: (no reason given)

edit on 25-3-2011 by monica86 because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 25 2011 @ 10:13 AM
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There is a new report from Voice of America reporter Steve Herman.

Japan's PM Pessimistic About Crippled Nuclear Complex

From that report:


Two weeks after a magnitude 9.0 earthquake triggered a huge tsunami that severely damaged a Japanese nuclear power plant, the situation is still not under control. The leader of Japan's government Friday evening expressed pessimism about the current state of the Fukushima 1 complex. It is still emitting radiation into the atmosphere, and there are worries about a possible breach of the core of one of the six reactors. Temperatures of exposed used fuel rods also remain a serious concern.

Japan's prime minister, Naoto Kan, looking somber in a nationally televised briefing, described the situation at the damaged Fukushima 1 nuclear power plant as remaining "very grave and serious."

Kan says vigilance is needed because we have not reached an optimistic point. But he adds things do not appear to be getting worse.


Is there anybody left that is optimistic about the current situation?



posted on Mar, 25 2011 @ 10:14 AM
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reply to post by Silverlok

Hey, the Japanese government is probably scouring ATS right now for more disinfo to spin their spin with... no sense giving them ammo.

Plutonium is usually found in uranium ores, probably because it is a component of the decay chain of uranium.

But yes, I will agree that plutonium is something our bodies could not have adapted to handle well.

TheRedneck



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