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Japan declares 'nuclear emergency' after quake

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posted on Mar, 11 2011 @ 01:08 PM
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If This is Truereply to post by welshbeliever
 


Then you'll all get out of there and don't go back for at least 10yrs or everyone will turn into aliens and bodies will be deformed and reformed as long as there is enough radiation in the air no one is safe. Once exposure has taken place your better off dead because any chance of giving birth is thrown out the _





posted on Mar, 11 2011 @ 01:13 PM
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Below are the latest press-releases by Tepco regarding current events. I think this helps clarify the situation a little bit, in terms of what reactors are or are not having issues, etc.

Tepco Press Releases (English Page)

Plant Status of Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station (as of Midnight, local time)

Impact to TEPCO's Facilities due to Miyagiken-Oki Earthquake (as of 2AM, local time)

There are TWO "Fukushima" sites. These are referred to as:

  1. "Fukushima I" or "Fukushima Daiichi" - which has six reactors. This is the site reporting coolant system issues.
  2. "Fukushima II" or "Fukushima Daini" - which has four reactors.

The "Fukushima Daiichi" site, which is also referred to in some circles as the "Fukushima I" site, has Six reactor's. Two of those reactors (#5 and #6) had already been shut-down for unrelated maintenance/inspection before the quake. The other four reactors (#1 through #4) were shut-down because of the quake.

Of the four reactors shut-down because of the quake, two reactors (#1 and #2) are apparently still a concern, based on these quotes from one of the press releases above:


Unit 1 (shut down due to earthquake) - Reactor was shut down and nuclear steam is cooled by the isolation condenser. - Currently, there is a possibility of a release of radioactive materials due to decrease in reactor water level. Therefore, the national government has instructed evacuation for those local residents within 3km radius of the periphery and indoor standby for those local residents between 3km and 10km radius of the periphery.



Unit 2 (shut down due to earthquake) - Reactor was shut down and although nuclear steam had been cooled by the Reactor Core Isolation Cooling system, the current operating status is unclear. However, reactor coolant level can be monitored by a temporary power supply and the level is stable. - Currently, there is a possibility of a release of radioactive materials due to decrease in reactor water level. Therefore, the national government has instructed evacuation for those local residents within 3km radius of the periphery and indoor standby for those local residents between 3km and 10km radius of the periphery.


Note: Emphasis added in quotes by poster (i.e. me)







edit on 2011-3-11 by EnhancedInterrogator because: Formatting fixes.



posted on Mar, 11 2011 @ 01:15 PM
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reply to post by cruisn06
 

I believe there was also a fire (since put out) at one of the nuclear power plants also, but not the reactor building - and not at the site that is reporting coolant issues.



posted on Mar, 11 2011 @ 01:18 PM
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reply to post by EnhancedInterrogator
 


Drudge Report is reporting that they will be releasing potentially radioactive steam to relief pressure.

I think they are dealing in unknown's over there and any "confirmation that everything is okay" is just wishful thinking which may or may not turn out to be true...



posted on Mar, 11 2011 @ 01:23 PM
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If a nuclear castrotophe occurs in just one reactor what amount of distance would the damage and radiation cover. How far could the winds carry the radiation. Anyone have an idea on this.



posted on Mar, 11 2011 @ 01:27 PM
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I hope this latest nuclear event gives Japan (and other countries) the incentive to develop and use Vacuum (zero-point-field) energy. I think it endless clean energy and no dangerous radiation.



posted on Mar, 11 2011 @ 01:34 PM
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This may be dating myself, but this reminds me a lot of the Three Mile Island Accident from the late 1970's. I grew-up about 110 miles from TMI. So, when that happened it was kind of big deal.
  • First, the story was "everything is ok, nothing to see here."
  • Then it was, "a coolant problem, but it's under control".
  • Then it was, "we might have to release a small amount of 'radioactive material' (gas)".
  • Then (a couple of decades later, when the reactor remains could be inspected), we found out they were a lot closer to a Nuclear Melt-Down / China Syndrome than even the plant operator's thought.

Very scary stuff indeed.



posted on Mar, 11 2011 @ 01:51 PM
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Originally posted by crazydaisy
If a nuclear castrotophe occurs in just one reactor what amount of distance would the damage and radiation cover. How far could the winds carry the radiation. Anyone have an idea on this.


I am by no means an expert, but my understanding is that there are several possible issues.

First, if pressure is building in the containment vessel, they will have to "vent" (release) the gases building up in there. This might not have a permanent impact on the surrounding area, but people breathing-in or otherwise being exposed to the radioactive material (if only on the short-term before it disperses) would be deadly. That's why the evacuation of the immediate area (currently 3-kilometer radius)

Second, if the reactor(s) can not be properly cooled, that end-event is potentially a Nuclear Melt-Down event. In this scenario, the nuclear fuel continues to heat-up, and essentially "burns" or "melts" it's way out the bottom of both the inner "containment vessel" and outer "reactor building". This is would be catastrophic. As the fuel burns it's way into the surrounding rock or soil, it will likely encounter ground-water (especially true when reactor's are located near rivers or ocean-side areas - which always seems to be case). When it does, that ground-water could become super-heated - resulting in a mixture of super-heated water/steam (also carrying other radioactive material from the melt-down) bursting-out of the ground as steam-vents or boiling-out into watersheds. The net effect would be less like a nuclear bomb, and more like a terrorist-delivered "dirty-bomb" - but far worse. The contamination would be wide-spread, with really no way to contain it. The water systems and/or wind could carry the contamination for indeterminate distances. Obviously, if the authorities had any reason to believe they were getting close to a melt-down, there would be a far greater area to be evacuated (50+ mile radius?).

Again, I am not an expert in this field. Maybe someone with experience in this field, or with knowledge of what the radius of destruction from Chernobyl who can jump in with better details. I believe that Chernobyl still has a 30 kilometer (19 mile) "exclusion zone" around it. But, it's widely believed there are impacts way outside that zone. That's just the area nobody is allowed back into without special permission from the government.
edit on 2011-3-11 by EnhancedInterrogator because: more spellings and grammers.



posted on Mar, 11 2011 @ 01:52 PM
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reply to post by EnhancedInterrogator
 


Yea, also reminds me of Chernobyl.

Which wasn't as powerful as those plants over there in Japan. The horror that would be released from any of those three sites would be huge.

Chernobyl link

/shudder



posted on Mar, 11 2011 @ 02:01 PM
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Some of the talking heads on (**) had a report from a Japanese minister saying they are going for a controlled vent of radiated material to release the pressure and get the situation under control

Does not sound good... my thoughts are with them that all goes well..


**not sure which channel I was on at the time as I was channel hopping news stations



posted on Mar, 11 2011 @ 02:12 PM
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Originally posted by EnhancedInterrogator
This may be dating myself, but this reminds me a lot of the Three Mile Island Accident from the late 1970's. I grew-up about 110 miles from TMI. So, when that happened it was kind of big deal.
  • First, the story was "everything is ok, nothing to see here."
  • Then it was, "a coolant problem, but it's under control".
  • Then it was, "we might have to release a small amount of 'radioactive material' (gas)".
  • Then (a couple of decades later, when the reactor remains could be inspected), we found out they were a lot closer to a Nuclear Melt-Down / China Syndrome than even the plant operator's thought.

Very scary stuff indeed.


Yes... I can date myself with those memories also.



posted on Mar, 11 2011 @ 02:19 PM
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I just seen a report on NHK that basically stated that the emergency generators are off line. They have resorted to emergency cooling, which is basically venting the reactor steam to the open air. Since it is not recondensed it is lost as it boils off and is vented. That is the reason the military is having to airlift in more heavy water coolant as the reactor boils it off.

Without the emergency generators there is no power to run the secondary cooling loop.

The evacuation is because the cooling water in the inner loop (the stuff that passes through the reactor) is mildly radioactive from it’s exposure to the core. (the exposure to radiation produces tritium and other short lived H isotopes in the water) And they don’t want to take a chance of anyone in the area being mildly exposed by the vented steam.

There is no core material being vented.
edit on 11-3-2011 by Mr Tranny because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 11 2011 @ 02:21 PM
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Originally posted by Larryman
Yes... I can date myself with those memories also.

You know, I really didn't appreciate Jimmy Carter so much at that time. But, in hindsight, I really do feel like he was the right man, in the right place at the right time (at least in regards to TMI). It apparently was not the first nuclear accident he was involved in resolving. Here's a small snippet (regarding the Chalk-River Nuclear Accident):

Carter was based in Schenectady, New York, and working on the nuclear propulsion system for the Seawolf submarine when he was ordered to Chalk River, joining other Canadian and American service personnel. Once they arrived, Carter's team used a model of the reactor to practice the steps necessary to disassemble the reactor and seal it off. Donning protective gear, each team member was lowered individually into the reactor. Staying for only a few seconds at a time to minimize exposure to radiation, each individual, including Carter, used hand tools to loosen bolts, remove nuts and take the other steps necessary to complete the disassembly process.

Sorry, don't mean to take this off-topic. And certainly don't want to get into a political argument about a former President's term. I just thought that piece was very relevant to what happened during that time (of the TMI accident), and how today's events really make me look back at it.
edit on 2011-3-11 by EnhancedInterrogator because: spelling and grammers.



posted on Mar, 11 2011 @ 02:28 PM
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Originally posted by Cygnis
Yea, also reminds me of Chernobyl.

Of course, to be fair to the industry. I should point out a couple of differences from Chernobyl:
  • Chernobyl had no containment structure beyond the reactor itself.
  • There was also a major fire, that made matters worse, and helped spread material further.



posted on Mar, 11 2011 @ 02:41 PM
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Reply to post by welshbeliever
 


They had to shut it down to make there is no leak. How long did you followed live news buddy ?!?


 
Posted Via ATS Mobile: m.abovetopsecret.com
 



posted on Mar, 11 2011 @ 02:50 PM
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I don't think this is posted already ...
.. it's from the Union of Concerned Scientists

Nuclear Crisis in Japan: What We Know

Bloomberg News reported that the battery life for the RCIC system is eight hours. This means that the batteries would have been depleted before 10 a.m. EST today. It is unclear if this report is accurate, since it suggests that several hours have elapsed without any core cooling. Bloomberg also reported that Japan had secured six backup batteries and planned to transport them to the site, possibly by military helicopter. It is unclear how long this operation would take.

Note-1: Emphasis in quote added by poster (i.e me)
Note-2: Don't confuse them with the Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists (the "doomsday clock" people)
edit on 2011-3-11 by EnhancedInterrogator because: sepellings and grahmers.



posted on Mar, 11 2011 @ 02:51 PM
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I'm not convinced either by the news, or lack of it, coming through about this emergency. Nuclear operators all over the globe have the reputation for downplaying major accidents, TMI as people have mentioned is perhaps the most notable.

The same happened with the British reactor fire at Windscale in 1957.

That's what I suspect is happening here, I think it's a very severe overheating in fuel elements, perhaps even a fire. If they're unable to introduce fresh coolant into the system safely, they'll need to vent excess gaseous pressure. Hopefully these reactors have filtered chimneys for that very purpose which can remove much of the radioactive material before it can escape into the environment.

But what kind of gas is it ? And these are comparatively low pressure reactors, how much excess pressure can their systems take before rupturing ?

Don't feel good about this at all. The news that the USAF has flown in coolant to the site doesn't inspire much confidence either, tbh.



posted on Mar, 11 2011 @ 03:26 PM
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More press releases (recently) on the Tepco web-site ...

Implementation of Measures to Reduce the Pressure of Reactor Containment Vessel of Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station

Today at approximately 2:46PM, turbines and reactors of Tokyo Electric Power Company's Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station Unit 1 (Boiling Water Reactor, rated output 460 Megawatts) and Units 2 and 3 (Boiling Water Reactor, Rated Output 784 Megawatts) that had been operating at rated power automatically shutdown due to the Tohoku-Chihou-Taiheiyou-Oki Earthquake. (already announced)
At this moment, we have decided to implement measures to reduce the pressure of the reactor containment vessel for those units that cannot confirm certain level of water injection by the Reactor Core Isolation Cooling System, in order to fully secure safety.

Impact to TEPCO's Facilities due to Miyagiken-Oki Earthquake (as of 4AM, local time)

*Evacuation has been instructed by the national government to the local residents within 3 km radius of Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station *We have decided to implement measures to reduce the pressure of the reactor containment vessel for those units that cannot confirm certain level of water injection by the Reactor Core Isolation Cooling System, in order to fully secure safety.

Yeah, this sounds bad (still). "Cannot confirm" is double-speak for "Do not know".
Note: Again, emphasis within the quotes added by the poster (i.e. me).
edit on 2011-3-11 by EnhancedInterrogator because: spellengs and grammarhs.



posted on Mar, 11 2011 @ 03:42 PM
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reply to post by EnhancedInterrogator
 


So the reactor core may (or may not) have been exposed ... in which case the gases they're about to vent may (or may not) be outrageously radioactive. If they don't know the level of coolant present, what else don't they know ?

As this gas (steam ?) is produced, it could back up into the coolant system itself, causing pockets ... a bit like an air block in a domestic water pipe. And most of us know how badly an air pocket can affect our tap water supply. So those gas pockets might give false readings as to the amount of coolant in the system ... so I suppose we should recognise that & try to understand the problems the engineers are facing. They just don't know.

But those gas pockets will also render the coolant system unworkable, so I'm guessing that the supplies of coolant, recently flown in, are required in case they need to inject it directly into the reactor core itself, to quench any fire or excess temperatures.

I'm just guessing, tbh. The lack of info here is deeply troubling.



posted on Mar, 11 2011 @ 03:49 PM
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Fox news (i know i know ) just said radiation levels around the plant are 1000 times higher than accepted normal.
no link yet just wanted to pass it on





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