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Japan declares 'nuclear emergency' after quake

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posted on Mar, 21 2011 @ 12:58 PM
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reply to post by monica86
 


good find monica..


that really does not look like its doing much..

I wonder if that is recent footage or something from last week..




posted on Mar, 21 2011 @ 01:01 PM
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reply to post by Fractured.Facade

By short, I am not talking days... just a wild guess, maybe within a year? So far, we have stretched that out by a week at best and released much more widespread radiation. Yes, the radiation around the plant would be astronomical, but it would be in a more confined area without all the steam spewing it into a cloud of death overhead.

The area is gone. I said that in the first few pages of this thread. The damage is being done and cannot be stopped. Cooling something that huge is an exercise in futility... they are cooling the outside and around the edges, which does luckily include some spent fuel pools... but I seriously doubt any cooling is happening deep inside the reactor itself in the middle and bottom of those buildings (or piles of rubble, depending on which unit we are talking about).

So nothing has been prevented, although it may have possibly been slowed by a few days at best. And how many lives are now in peril from that radioactive cloud?

Quite a high price to pay for so little, IMHO.

TheRedneck



posted on Mar, 21 2011 @ 01:01 PM
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reply to post by TheRedneck
 


Thanks Redneck. Very sorry to, it is hard to keep up with this thread.
Daughter is sick and a lot of work


Thanks for all your input here.



posted on Mar, 21 2011 @ 01:04 PM
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Hi, any opinions on this?


Kitazawa: Surface temperatures below 100C

Japan's defense minister says the surface temperatures of all 6 reactors at the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant are lower than 100 degrees Celsius. In a news conference on Sunday, Toshimi Kitazawa quoted an expert from the Nuclear and Industrial Safety Agency as saying the data are very valuable because temperatures below 100 degrees confirm the existence of water in spent fuel rod storage pools.

Kitazawa said Self-Defense Forces officials measured the temperatures from a helicopter using an infrared device on Sunday for a second consecutive day. He said the surface temperature of the Number One reactor was 58 degrees Celsius, that of Number 2 stood at 35 degrees, Number 3 at 62 degrees, Number 4 at 42 degrees, Number 5 at 24 degrees, and Number 6 at 25 degrees.

He said the temperatures of Number 1, Number 3 and Number 4 reactors are believed to be the surface temperatures of the spent fuel rod storage pools. The buildings housing the containers of these three reactors were damaged. Kitazawa said he was relieved to see the temperatures stay below 100 degrees for 2 days in a row. He said the public will also feel relieved.

He added that a reading of 128 degrees Celsius was recorded above the containment vessel of Number 3 reactor, but experts say the figure is within expectations given that it was measured right above the reactor. Monday, March 21, 2011 05:41 +0900 (JST)


Source



posted on Mar, 21 2011 @ 01:05 PM
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reply to post by TheRedneck
 





Entombment will be the result, I'm sure, but we're not there yet. We're too busy drawing this thing out so we can spread the radiation better.


Well said.


This seems to be the case. I have a question. Could they dump sand on it, like Chernobyl? I know I keep mentioning it, but I just watched Zorgon's Chernobyl documentaries. The sand melted and fused with the puddle of rod mess. This made a hardened, lava like coating that kind of helped contain the runaway meltdown. I know you know this but, it looked like it helped out that situation. With the cost of many lives anyways. I know the radiation is crazy high, but something has to be done. Unless they are letting the radiation contaminate the people. Then we have another set of issues.


If this question has been asked like 120 pages ago, then nevermind, I know you are extremely busy trying to keep up with everybody. Sorry to barge back in and take the thread space, but I am concerned with this situation. Not for us in the states, but humanity in general.



posted on Mar, 21 2011 @ 01:06 PM
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reply to post by Moonbeams771
 
I would like to know where the steam or smoke is coming from if the temps are below 100 degrees C.

Sounds like more Japanese baloney.



posted on Mar, 21 2011 @ 01:06 PM
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reply to post by Bicent76
 


I think it's from friday or so, when the white smoke was coming out from n.3



posted on Mar, 21 2011 @ 01:07 PM
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reply to post by Bicent76
 


I posted it a couple of days ago



posted on Mar, 21 2011 @ 01:08 PM
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reply to post by Moonbeams771
 


It's somewhat good news so it's best to ignore it



posted on Mar, 21 2011 @ 01:15 PM
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reply to post by monica86
 


Great video. I wish that guy taking the video would briefly hold up a Geiger Counter so we
could see the current level.

----------------------------------------
Clearly Reactor 3 is a mess.
Good learning point for the same reactor operators in the USA. If things go wrong, Step 1: remove
the panels on the sides in order to vent possible hydrogen gas. The explosions just make a
bad situation worse.
Step 2: Install huge cooling towers and let gravity do the all the work for you. Electric pumps
optional - just open the valves.



posted on Mar, 21 2011 @ 01:24 PM
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reply to post by Eurisko2012
 


That video is a couple days old I believe, and provides little context to the current status at the site, but does display the utter futility in spraying this problem with a fire-hose quite dramatically.



Still waiting for more encouraging news.. anything good will do.



posted on Mar, 21 2011 @ 01:24 PM
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I'm still bemused why they hadn't asked for as many fire fighting sea planes capable of carrying high volumes of water , not a heli with a bucket.
Surely about 30 of these doing a couple of runs each would have helped early doors

www.richard-seaman.com...



posted on Mar, 21 2011 @ 01:29 PM
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The way i see it is if they entomb it all then it would end up like Chernobyl...if they did that then Japan would never be habitable for years. They would loose everything !

IAEA

So they may as well keep trying to mess about with it untill it blows. Then at least that way they can say they tried, honour and not liking being a country that 'gives up'



posted on Mar, 21 2011 @ 01:30 PM
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reply to post by cripmeister
 


LOL, no it's obvious crap. The surface temperatures of the reactors in NO WAY indicate anything about the spent fuel pools. And less than 100C would seem to contradict the EFFING STEAM rising from them.


But then again, that doesn't fit your opinion that we're all hoping for disaster and doom, so best to ignore it.



posted on Mar, 21 2011 @ 01:38 PM
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reply to post by iWokeUp
 


I am not actually that pessimistic

However, if they really needed to evacuate tokyo they would want at least a few weeks to plan the thing
, during which time it would be far better if people were oblivious of what was going to happen, otherwise they would also have to deal with mega-city panic , something probably worse than radioactivity



posted on Mar, 21 2011 @ 01:49 PM
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So It would be my opinion any and all material and equipment needed for any lvl of disaster, should therefore be onsite, from day one of said site operations for any and all Nuclear power plants. I would have to also assume that the storage of these materials and equipment would also have to be housed to protect them from all possible scenarios be it nature or man. To myself I believe this would be the only way to ever claim this means of power even remotely safe. I think a back up for the back up of the backup for the power and coolant would be necessary as well...

Nah I change my mind the risks outway even greed. Its just not safe...
edit on 21-3-2011 by 5StarOracle because: ...



posted on Mar, 21 2011 @ 01:51 PM
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reply to post by TheRedneck
 


I'm really, really, really hoping that if the main reactor pressure vessel's in either #2 or #3 are breached in any form, that the "wet-well" (aka "suppression pool") will actually do it's job in spreading-out the "messy stuff", allowing it to cool, and containing it.

If that works, perhaps it's a matter of moving all the spent-fuel rods/remains out of (what's left of) those cooling-ponds - assuming that can even been done (another "never-been-done-before" feat), getting all the fuel rods/remains out of the reactor's that haven't breached (#1?, #5 and #6), closing-up the site, and maybe entombing the reactor's that did have a "breach".

Of course, a big obstacle to all that is not really knowing the conditions inside those buildings to evaluate how much of that can actually be done.

For #5 and #6 it should be much like the "decommission" of a nuclear power-plant site, but with the added complication of working-around any radiation hazards associated with accessing those buildings (i.e. moving people/equipment/remains) past the other part of the site where all things have gone to crap.

I know, it's a all stretch, and all of it's never been tested/done before ... I'm just saying I'm hoping. I wish I could say I was hoping with more confidence.


This may also explain some of the thinking on the ground there. It may be wishful thinking, but they're giving it their best effort. My only real criticism (other than the lack of information being dispensed), is that they haven't expanded the mandatory evacuation zone. Not sure what the range should be, but telling people in the 20km-30km range to stay indoors doesn't really work in the long-term. They may as well just tell them to GTFO.

IMH(f)O anyway.



posted on Mar, 21 2011 @ 02:21 PM
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Where are the US and global nuclear experts?

Why has there not been an international effort to take over at this site??... an all out effort by many nations involving the best of the best the world has to confront this problem?

The international community had no problem collectively getting involved with bombing Libya.

Is it because they believe the Japanese can handle the situation on their own?

Or is it because no one wants to be held responsible if all efforts fail, and everyone is scrambling to assess blame?

Are blame, culpability and reputations more important than attempting to save lives?

It wasn't the fault of the reactor design, it was the mishandling of the situation by ____________ ?




posted on Mar, 21 2011 @ 02:37 PM
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The whole situation in Japan is very tragic. To add more horror to a country already devastated from the earthquake and tsunami, is beyond words.

Whether or not the effects of this nuclear disaster spreads worldwide, a whole country has been ruined for many generations to come. All along it has seemed they are fighting to prolong the meltdown of all of these reactors. It is also apparant that the information is being filtered to some extent to hide the huge reality of the situation. I can only imagine the decisions and choices these people have and the horrors of making them. Do you risk mass panic or keep control over the general population? If their motives are not of ill intent.

I think I would have advised and encouraged all the foriegn visitors/workers to leave first, followed by sections of the community in an ever-expanding zone from the reactors. At least that way it may be possible to adhieve a mass evacuation in an orderly way (if that is possible!). I can understand keeping information limited to reduce panic, but then withheld information must be shared with other governments and agencies so everyone can get their jobs done. Not that I am excusing deliberate falsifying of information!



posted on Mar, 21 2011 @ 02:37 PM
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reply to post by TheRedneck
 


TheRedneck.......... Regarding radiation in Japans tap water. The plant is built on rock and Japan is one of the leading countries in the world for rain/surface water harvesting and I believe radiation attaches to minerals in water and is not very easy to filter out. Also when the steam from the plant hits the cold air it turns back to water.

In your opinion do you think it is possible that their water harvesting system is helping to spread the risk of radiation across Japan??



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