It looks like you're using an Ad Blocker.

Please white-list or disable AboveTopSecret.com in your ad-blocking tool.

Thank you.

 

Some features of ATS will be disabled while you continue to use an ad-blocker.

 

Japan declares 'nuclear emergency' after quake

page: 265.htm
513
<< 262  263  264    266  267  268 >>

log in

join
share:

posted on Mar, 20 2011 @ 11:12 PM
link   
reply to post by zorgon
 


If those are spent fuel rods wouldn't the radiation measured at the plant be much higher?




posted on Mar, 20 2011 @ 11:12 PM
link   

Originally posted by JackBauer
Japan nuclear safety agency says pressure rising in no. 3 reactor, monitoring whether to take steps to release pressure by "venting".

-Reuters.com

Slow news day. (concerning the reactors atleast)
edit on 3/20/2011 by JackBauer because: (no reason given)


Wind must have changed? Not blowing toward Toyko now they can vent?



posted on Mar, 20 2011 @ 11:16 PM
link   
This is a breaking news feed.



NEWS ADVISORY: 1 worker found to be exposed to radiation of 150 millisievert per hour


link

edit on 20-3-2011 by MedievalGhost because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 20 2011 @ 11:20 PM
link   

Originally posted by Wertwog

Originally posted by JackBauer
Japan nuclear safety agency says pressure rising in no. 3 reactor, monitoring whether to take steps to release pressure by "venting".

-Reuters.com

Slow news day. (concerning the reactors atleast)
edit on 3/20/2011 by JackBauer because: (no reason given)


Wind must have changed? Not blowing toward Toyko now they can vent?


That's my assumption.

12:18 AM EDT - Japan nuclear safety agency says does not believe much water from no. 3 and no. 4 reactors is seeping underground.

-Reuters.com

Seeping underground? can someone explain this?



posted on Mar, 20 2011 @ 11:21 PM
link   
reply to post by Soulwarrior
 


I only really have experience of low power magnox fuel rods used in a "research" reactor. When they were removed from the pile, they were pulled into fairly bulky cannisters/sheaths, not really small ones. This was even for "spent" fuel rods.

The cannisters had been designed to withstand fairly massive impact or explosion so the fuel rod could not be exposed in an accident.

I would expect higher output reactors would require even more shielding around their fuel.

Perhaps they had a slimline shield for reactor to reactor transfers or, more likely, what you are describing are actually the fuel rod shells. The fuel is usually added as small pellets to the shells (you wouldn't want too large a mass of raw fuel at any one place).
edit on 20/3/2011 by chr0naut because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 20 2011 @ 11:22 PM
link   
Where are the fresh or new fuel rods stored?



While I was doing a Google search for an answer to the above question I did find this article I thought I would share with you:



New Invention Using Spent Nuclear Fuel Rods Could Unlock U.S. Oil Reserves Three Times Larger Than Saudi Arabia's


LINK



posted on Mar, 20 2011 @ 11:24 PM
link   
reply to post by Wertwog
 


OMG who would have guessed, earlier in this thread I suggested a controlled meltdown. Low and behold this guy repeats the notion in that it should have been incorporated in the design in the first place. He says that a reactor should be-able to withstand a meltdown.

According to this man we are very well likely going to see a full meltdown. I suggested earlier that the solution is to get as much of that nuclear trash separated and isolated as possible. I even suggested a way that this could be achieved -- to move the rods even in damaged condition in coolant to destination; only a little distance is needed to keep this stuff away from the bulk of the nuclear material (stop it from pooling together which is bad news).

The key is to get material out of there in more manageable segments, this way radiation levels do not get super lethal and render it impossible for anybody to do any work fixing the situation what-so-ever.

I think this source and this man's statements are credible. I think we need to come up with something radical to fix this now or we are doomed, and not just come up with, but take action. This course of fighting a losing battle is going to issue some nasty consequences seeing as they aren't considering removing the contribution those rods in the pools will have towards the final outcome of this event.



posted on Mar, 20 2011 @ 11:25 PM
link   

Originally posted by chr0naut
reply to post by Wertwog
 


As most of the information we have been given so far is questionable, that is very hard to estimate.

Chain reactions mean that the rise in released enrgy is logarithmic and very fast. A sub-critical pool under the fuel rods will produce more heat, which in turn will melt more fuel rods and the process will accelerate rapidly as more stuff falls into the pool.

As we don't know the level of enrichment, it is really hard to identify when (or even if) criticality will occur.


So, is it your opinion that we are still at a point with reactor #3 that we could have a "squib" type explosion? If so, what are we talking in terms of damage/lethality.



posted on Mar, 20 2011 @ 11:29 PM
link   
reply to post by AlaskanDad
 


Shudder.

Even if they shrouded the fuel rods to prevent stuff from leaching out, you are putting it into the ground where it is sure to be forgotten/ignored.

Even stabilised in Synroc, it will leach into the groundwater eventually.

This is both stupid and dangerous, no-one will convince me otherwise.



posted on Mar, 20 2011 @ 11:33 PM
link   
reply to post by Wertwog
 


Based upon the recent NIWA report, I think that a meltdown is not very likely.

That does not mean it can't happen.


I certainly hope that they are telling the truth.
edit on 20/3/2011 by chr0naut because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 20 2011 @ 11:46 PM
link   
Latest TEPCO release, from a little over 1 hour ago ...
... not available in English yet, so Google-Translated/Engrish provided ...



Don't see anything really significantly "new" in this one either.

PS: One weird thing on there regarding reactor #5, etc. ...

Today at 11:00 am 36 minutes of Unit 5 and 6 on the power house, start the receiving line from the Forest of Night
... some weird Anime reference or something?

edit on 2011-3-21 by EnhancedInterrogator because: added post-script



posted on Mar, 20 2011 @ 11:52 PM
link   

Originally posted by MedievalGhost



A photographer holds a radiation detector indicating 0.20 microsieverts per hour at a devastated factory area hit by earthquake and tsunami in Sendai


link

The above photo is showing 0.20 microsieverts per hour in Sendai city. Compared to other examples below-




Single Dose Examples-

* Eating one banana: 0.0001 mSv

* Dental radiography: 0.005 mSv[4]

* Average dose to people living within 16 km of Three Mile Island accident: 0.08 mSv; maximum dose: 1 mSv[5]

* Mammogram: 3 mSv[4]

* Brain CT scan: 0.8–5 mSv[6]

* Chest CT scan: 6–18 mSv[6]

* Gastrointestinal series X-ray investigation: 14 mSv[7]

* International Commission on Radiological Protection recommended limit for volunteers averting major nuclear escalation: 500 mSv[8]

* International Commission on Radiological Protection recommended limit for volunteers rescuing lives or preventing serious injuries: 1000 mSv[8]





Yearly Dose Examples-

* Living near a nuclear power station: 0.0001–0.01 mSv/year[7][9]

* Living near a coal power station: 0.0003 mSv/year[9]

* Sleeping next to a human for 8 hours every night: 0.02 mSv/yr[9]

* Cosmic radiation (from sky) at sea level: 0.24 mSv/year[7]

* Terrestrial radiation (from ground): 0.28 mSv/year[7]

* Natural radiation in the human body: 0.40 mSv/year[7]

* Radiation produced by the granite of the United States Capitol building: 0.85 mSv/year[11]

* Average individual background radiation dose: 2 mSv/year; 1.5 mSv/year for Australians, 3.0 mSv/year for Americans[9][5][10]

* New York-Tokyo flights for airline crew: 9 mSv/year[10]

* Atmospheric sources (mostly radon): 2 mSv/year[7][12]

* Total average radiation dose for Americans: 6.2 mSv/year[13]

* Smoking 1.5 packs/day: 13-60 mSv/year[11][12]

* Current average limit for nuclear workers: 20 mSv/year[10]

* Background radiation in parts of Iran, India and Europe: 50 mSv/year[10]

* Elevated limit for workers during Fukushima emergency: 250 mSv/year[14]

edit on 20-3-2011 by MedievalGhost because: incorrect info posted



Lets not forget not to confuse micro with milli. We were getting that alot from the media, I believe.

Frequently used SI multiples are the millisievert (1 mSv = 10−3 Sv = 0.001 Sv) and microsievert (1 μSv = 10−6 Sv = 0.000001 Sv).

en.wikipedia.org...

Micro=1 μSv
Milli=1 mSv


Just for clarification. I see that the quoted text says micro sievert and I believe that the rating is milli. I believe that the reading should be 0.2 milli sieverts. I don't know if anyone cares, but it took me a minute to get this straight the other day. I hope I am right.

I believe the media was doing this on purpose to down play the readings. Sorry for the long quoted post..
edit on 20-3-2011 by liejunkie01 because: link, sorry

edit on 20-3-2011 by liejunkie01 because: (no reason given)



EDIT: For future readers. We resolved this. It is micro. It looked like msv/h to me. My bad.
edit on 21-3-2011 by liejunkie01 because: EDIT



posted on Mar, 20 2011 @ 11:59 PM
link   

Originally posted by cripmeister
reply to post by zorgon
 


If those are spent fuel rods wouldn't the radiation measured at the plant be much higher?


Mar 19 19:00 - North of Service Bldg - 2972 microSeiverts/hr
Mar 20 10:00 - NOSB - 2652 MicroS/hr
Mar 20 - 15:00 - NOSB - 3054 MicroS/hr
Mar 21 - 10:00 - NOSB - 2360 MicroS/hr

How high is high for you? These numbers are equal to getting around 1000 FULL sieverts a year. And where the hell exactly is the "Service Bldg." I'm guessing it's not connected to any of the reactor buildings like a duplex so I'm wondering what the sievs are inside one fo them.



posted on Mar, 20 2011 @ 11:59 PM
link   
Just showed-up on NHK ...

[NHK] Restoring external power to Fukushima Daiichi


The Tokyo Electric Power Company has resumed work to restore external power to the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant, as part of its efforts to regain cooling functions.

This follows operations by the Tokyo Fire Department and Self-Defense Forces to douse the No.3 and No.4 reactors with water.

They ended their water-spraying operations to cool down the spent fuel rod pools on Monday morning.

External power was extended to the electricity distribution panels of the No.2 and No.5 reactors on Sunday, and power can now be supplied to reactors number 1, 2, 5, and 6.

In order to get the electricity back on at the No.2 reactor, the power company plans to check various measurement devices and lighting systems in the central control room -- the heart of the plant -- and check for electricity leakage in the battery charging room.

The No.3 and No.4 reactors, where high levels of radiation are forcing workers to exercise extreme caution, are scheduled to be connected to the electricity distribution panels on Tuesday.

The power company is doing everything it can to restore external power, which it sees as essential to regaining cooling functions for the reactor vessels and the spent fuel rod pools.
Monday, March 21, 2011 12:46 +0900 (JST)


Note: Emphasis added by poster (i.e. me)



posted on Mar, 21 2011 @ 12:11 AM
link   

Originally posted by chr0naut
reply to post by Wertwog
 


Based upon the recent NIWA report, I think that a meltdown is not very likely.

That does not mean it can't happen.


I certainly hope that they are telling the truth.
edit on 20/3/2011 by chr0naut because: (no reason given)


Given what you guess was the fuel amount and the type, if, and I realize it's a big if, we do have a meltdown causing a 'squib' type event, what are we talking about here in terms of damage/lethality?



posted on Mar, 21 2011 @ 12:19 AM
link   
This update just showed-up on the NISA site (update #38) ...
(English version not available yet, so Google-Translated/Engrish provided)

Earthquake Information (Part 38) (currently March 21 at 10:30) [Japanese] [Google-Translated to Engrish]



posted on Mar, 21 2011 @ 12:23 AM
link   
We MAY be looking at another escalating situation, this time at the Horiguchi Hitachinaka City reactor complex in Ibaraki prefecture, just south of Fukushima. Not certain of the legitimacy of this website but there are elevated readings showing on a couple of different monitoring sites I've found.

Here's a link:

truthiscontagious.com...

And here is a link to the monitoring site (look at #15):

www.bousai.ne.jp...

And the main page (gotta love how Fukushima is 'under survey'):

www.bousai.ne.jp...

Nothing to freak out about but definitely worth keeping an eye on.




edit on 21-3-2011 by buskey because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 21 2011 @ 12:31 AM
link   
reply to post by liejunkie01
 


Originally posted by liejunkie01

Just for clarification. I see that the quoted text says micro sievert and I believe that the rating is milli. I believe that the reading should be 0.2 milli sieverts. I don't know if anyone cares, but it took me a minute to get this straight the other day. I hope I am right.


Here is the geiger counter in question, blown up, lightened, and sharpened:




Loos like microSieverts μSv to me.



posted on Mar, 21 2011 @ 12:32 AM
link   

Originally posted by buskey
We MAY be looking at another escalating situation, this time at the Horiguchi Hitachinaka City reactor complex in Ibaraki prefecture, just south of Fukushima. Not certain of the legitimacy of this website but there are elevated readings showing on a couple of different monitoring sites I've found.


TEPCO has a "thermal" plant in Hitachinaka, but no nuclear plant there.
"Thermal" is Japan's way of saying fossil-fuel-burning (i.e. Coal, Oil, etc.).



posted on Mar, 21 2011 @ 12:35 AM
link   
reply to post by EnhancedInterrogator
 

PS: Here's PDF about the plant, which apparently uses a coal-fired boiler system.




top topics



 
513
<< 262  263  264    266  267  268 >>

log in

join