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Japan declares 'nuclear emergency' after quake

page: 260.htm
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posted on Mar, 20 2011 @ 05:24 PM
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Whole lot of shaking still going on.. Ring of Fire is hot last few days..



www.iris.edu...
edit on 20-3-2011 by zorgon because: (no reason given)




posted on Mar, 20 2011 @ 05:26 PM
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BTW - I think we can safely surmise those tanks aren't there to clear roads for water ejection vehicles that are already there and working.

Obviously, these tanks were chosen for their superior radiation protection, the question is what are they really there for?



posted on Mar, 20 2011 @ 05:26 PM
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Fukushima is one of the largest reactors in the world.

The world has, for some time, been running out of Uranium worth processing.

The boiling water reactors were originally designed to 'burn' low enriched uranium.

The reactors were converted to mixed oxide fuel (MOX) which produces more energy but in a boiling water plant is more dangerous & critical.

It is also possible that the plant was using some rods of highly enriched uranium and/or was converted from a 'burner' reactor to a 'breeder' reactor.

Breeder reactors give even more output and also create highly enriched byproducts (mainly Plutonium). This is both weapons grade and can be re-burnt later, giving even more energy from the same amount of fuel.

The problem is that running a reactor like this is skirting the edge of overheat. It can be managed but it requires constant monitoring and that nothing should go wrong as it can 'runaway' very rapidly.

If the reactor was operating according to its design constraints, inserting all the control rods should have shut it down and cooling would begin almost immediately. The company confirmed that the rods had inserted automatically when the quake struck. There should only have been an issue with leftover heat which still needed to be extracted from the inactive pile and which could cause boiling off of the water if the coolant system failed.

If the coolant failed and the water boiled off, the control rods should still have been sufficient to prevent the reactor from restarting, even though the insulation/damping of the water was removed from the picture.

Instead, we have seen rising temperatures. Therefore the control rods are insufficient to damp down the reactor and the reactors are still running, so the reactors were likely operating in a 'breeding' configuration and we are being lied to.

If the melted rods pool, and the reactor was running in a breeding configuration, the pool can go critical or even supercritical. This means that they could detonate!



posted on Mar, 20 2011 @ 05:27 PM
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reply to post by zorgon
 

Ring of fire.
It's always "hot".



posted on Mar, 20 2011 @ 05:29 PM
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reply to post by Phage
 


Oh, no need to play semantics games.

You know what he means by "hot."



posted on Mar, 20 2011 @ 05:31 PM
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reply to post by Wertwog
 


According to this diagram. There are four nozzles coming off of the vessel.




EDIT: I hope this is the same type of reactor we are talking about. Maybe redneck can verify.
edit on 20-3-2011 by liejunkie01 because: EDIT



posted on Mar, 20 2011 @ 05:36 PM
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reply to post by liejunkie01
 


The same is done on ships. When a cut is made in ship's structure, a reinforcing ring, called a coaming is inserted in the hole, or a doubler, shaped like a doughnut, placed around the hole to compensate for the loss of strength caused by the hole cut. Pretty standard fare actually.



posted on Mar, 20 2011 @ 05:39 PM
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reply to post by 00nunya00
 

Yes, I do.
The Ring of Fire always has lots of earthquakes. Particularly in the area of a recent major earthquake.

edit on 3/20/2011 by Phage because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 20 2011 @ 05:42 PM
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Yesterday, Nisa sent a monitoring car in front of the main building at Fukushima Daiichi

These are the levels of radioactive particles


www.nisa.meti.go.jp...

I have also found out a bit more about the ratings given by Nisa.
(they are temporary ratings, as you might imagine)

The ratings should be based on 3 criteria

Criterion 1: People and the Environment,
Criterion 2: Radiological Barriers and Controls at facilities,
Criterion 3: Defence in Depth). The highest level among the three becomes the rating of the event. The scale ranges from level 0 (No safety significance) to level 7 (Major accident). (Ref. INES User’s Manual 2008 Edition


For Daiichi, however, so far the level 5 ratings are solely based on Criteria 2 and 3.
There is not preliminary assessment for Criteria 1.
So, they are not making any forecast regarding the impact on people or the environment

Units 1, 2 and 3 of Fukushima Dai-ich - It is considered that such total loss of cooling function led to the reactor core to be damaged, due to the inability to provide service by the Turbine Driven Pump resulted from the temperature rise in the Suppression Chamber caused by the operation of the pump. The leakage of radioactive materials continues. (Temporary rating of INES*)
Criterion 1 - TBD
Criterion 2 - 5
Criterion 3 - 3


Regarding reactor n.4. They have not assessed criterion n.2 either.
They say

The rating on Criteria l and 2 are to be determined later because the event is not led to be ceased


www.nisa.meti.go.jp...



posted on Mar, 20 2011 @ 05:43 PM
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reply to post by Wertwog
 


In early reactors, the hot leg nozzles (outlets) were at the top of the vessel. The cold leg nozzles (inlets) were at the bottom. In newer designs, both hot and cold leg nozzles are at the top.

The change was made to ensure water stays in the pot if there is a leak.

In the old designs, water could completely drain from the pot via a cold leg nozzle if there was a leak on the inlet side of the system.


edit on 20-3-2011 by Hugues de Payens because: Editorial



posted on Mar, 20 2011 @ 05:43 PM
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reply to post by Phage
 


This I wouldn't know anything about! Not an EQ person, myself.

But the fact that it's acting normally wasn't apparent from your reply about it being always hot because it's the ring of fire, so you really can't blame me.



posted on Mar, 20 2011 @ 05:46 PM
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reply to post by 00nunya00
 

The "fire" and earthquake activity are related.



posted on Mar, 20 2011 @ 05:49 PM
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www.yomiuri.co.jp...



Meanwhile, TEPCO was considering using a German-made high-pressure pump capable of spraying water on a distant target with a boom longer than 50 meters, according to TEPCO sources. The pump is used to pour concrete at construction sites.


I'm thinking they're going to need four of these pumps, just in case they need to spray concrete, I mean water, into 1-2-3-4 concurrently.


edit on Sun Mar 20 2011 by DontTreadOnMe because: needed "ex" tags



posted on Mar, 20 2011 @ 05:57 PM
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Originally posted by chr0naut

Instead, we have seen rising temperatures. Therefore the control rods are insufficient to damp down the reactor and the reactors are still running, so the reactors were likely operating in a 'breeding' configuration and we are being lied to.

If the melted rods pool, and the reactor was running in a breeding configuration, the pool can go critical or even supercritical. This means that they could detonate!


You sound like you know something about this. Do you work in the industry? This is contrary to what I understood Redneck to be saying (I might just have misunderstood). I thought the danger was of a sudden huge radioactive release, but are you talking about mushroomy clouds etc.?



posted on Mar, 20 2011 @ 06:03 PM
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reply to post by chr0naut
 



You are talking about scramming the reactor. This does not completely shut down the fission process. Thus the decay heat must be removed.



posted on Mar, 20 2011 @ 06:06 PM
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reply to post by the seeker_713g

I was referring to plutonium in the fuel mix, as in MOX fuel. There is always some plutonium in a uranium decay.

Sorry, thought i was clear about that distinction but apparently not.

TheRedneck



posted on Mar, 20 2011 @ 06:08 PM
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reply to post by Phage

I don't think I can really argue with that assessment Phage.

I was just pointing out that it was irrelevant to the immediate problems.

TheRedneck



posted on Mar, 20 2011 @ 06:12 PM
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Originally posted by TheRedneck
reply to post by the seeker_713g

I was referring to plutonium in the fuel mix, as in MOX fuel. There is always some plutonium in a uranium decay.

Sorry, thought i was clear about that distinction but apparently not.

TheRedneck
My bad, Red; I might have missed that; after 250+ pages here plus watching and reading about Chernobyl it gets a little confusing, my friend.



seeker
edit on 3/20/2011 by the seeker_713g because: typo



posted on Mar, 20 2011 @ 06:14 PM
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reply to post by Wertwog

The heat and radiation go hand-in-hand. We're a long long way from this thing even starting to cool down on its own. That's the mechanism behind a meltdown; the constant extreme heat production keeps things around it melting instead of allowing large masses to cool the puddle down. The entire amount of energy that would be produced during the lifetime of the fuel, from enrichment to lead, is being released with no controls. That's 500+ megawatts of usable output power, plus losses from steam generation and associated heat loss that dwarf output, plus decay heat produced while the spent rods would be cooling down.

I believe someone earlier mentioned that the puddle in Chernobyl is actually still molten after 25 years.

TheRedneck



posted on Mar, 20 2011 @ 06:18 PM
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reply to post by liejunkie01

Sorry, but I have no idea exactly what type of reactor we are talking about. I am going by basic design principles that are constant between all steam reactors.

TheRedneck




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