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Japan declares 'nuclear emergency' after quake

page: 26.htm
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posted on Mar, 12 2011 @ 08:16 PM
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Thank you, TheRedneck. Your comments about the strength and the decorum of the Japanese even in the face of this tragedy are greatly comforting.

As various nation-states make relief efforts, have any included potassium iodide pills to protect the thyroid glands of those who have been affected by radiation exposure?




posted on Mar, 12 2011 @ 08:17 PM
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reply to post by EnhancedInterrogator

"Homer" kin barely read Anglish, much less that thar Jay-pan-eese.


Get it in English and I'll take a gander.


TheRedneck



posted on Mar, 12 2011 @ 08:18 PM
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reply to post by TheRedneck
 

I was hoping the numbers/measurments would be meaningful to you (or maybe somebody else on here).



posted on Mar, 12 2011 @ 08:20 PM
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CNN is doing the kindergarten version of how a Nuclear Reactor works right now.


I guess it helps, having been through all that during TMI, maybe I'm being callous.



posted on Mar, 12 2011 @ 08:24 PM
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Originally posted by TheRedneck
Get it in English and I'll take a gander.


Here's a Google-Translated attempt at the PDF ...
Google-Translated PDF of Radiation Readings



posted on Mar, 12 2011 @ 08:26 PM
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lol. CNN has a meteorologist who looks like Tom Arnold explaining the intricacies of nuclear power plants....funny.

Anyways some questions for those in the know:

1. It is my understanding that potassium iodide is not a magic bullet or panacea to combat radiation poisoning outside of protecting the thyroid. Your remaining organs are still vulnerable. Is this true ?

2. Why would they build these plants in such a volatile area. I understand the need for power but given its a geographic hotspot for earthquakes why risk it. Yes they can be fortified and are built for disaster but clearly they are not 100%, so again why allow them in that region ?

brill



posted on Mar, 12 2011 @ 08:29 PM
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reply to post by EnhancedInterrogator

OK, OK, I looked at the scribbles.... as advanced as the Japanese are, you'd think they could speak English....


Making the assumption that these are radiation measurements taken at regular intervals, it appears that initially there was no leak, but then they had a few sudden spikes. That would be consistent with a sudden crack of the reactor housing. The spikes seemed to lessen as the readings overall went up, again consistent with a small crack; the crack was initially venting only under pressure and then widened enough for a slow continuous vent which increased with pressure spikes. Then finally the spikes seemed to disappear and the readings stayed a little high for a while then retreated back down slowly, consistent with the reactor finally cooling below meltdown stage.

That's my unscientific, uninformed, unable-to-read-the-darned-thing interpretation.

TheRedneck



posted on Mar, 12 2011 @ 08:32 PM
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Originally posted by brill
1. It is my understanding that potassium iodide is not a magic bullet or panacea to combat radiation poisoning outside of protecting the thyroid. Your remaining organs are still vulnerable. Is this true ?


True. The pill fills the thyroid with iodine so that the radioactive iodine can't get in. However, you breathe it into your lungs.


2. Why would they build these plants in such a volatile area. I understand the need for power but given its a geographic hotspot for earthquakes why risk it. Yes they can be fortified and are built for disaster but clearly they are not 100%, so again why allow them in that region ?

brill


Good question. Always was something I wondered about as well. Trying to prove a point?




posted on Mar, 12 2011 @ 08:33 PM
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Originally posted by brill
Why would they build these plants in such a volatile area.


In Japan, there really isn't any such thing as a non-volatile area. The whole country is basically a volcanic island chain, on the edge of a subduction zone. Unfortunately, it seems like reactors are also almost always built near natural supplies of water, to be able to use it for cooling (in an emergency, if not part of it's normal operation). For example, San Onfre, CA there are no "cooling towers" (like Three-Mile-Island and many other stations use). So, my guess is they take advantage of the cold (Pacific Ocean) to run the heat-exchangers. Hopefully, wherever the seawater goes, is 2 or 3 stages separated from the reactor core, in whatever heat-exchanger design they may be using.

PS: TMI, although it had the "classic" cooling towers, was built on an island in the middle of a river also.


edit on 2011-3-12 by EnhancedInterrogator because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 12 2011 @ 08:34 PM
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Here's the latest news I've found. My question is re the fuel rod exposure & can you have a partial melt down?


BREAKING NEWS: Fukushima plant radiation briefly at 1,204 micro sievert: Edano (11:23)

BREAKING NEWS: Top of MOX fuel rods 3 meters above water at Fukushima plant: TEPCO (11:06)

Source english.kyodonews.jp...

Ektar



posted on Mar, 12 2011 @ 08:35 PM
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reply to post by EnhancedInterrogator

Thank you! I can read again!


I was reading Gamma radiation, not neutron emissions... according to that translation, there was almost no neutron emission from the plant. The gamma spikes still indicate a crack, but the crack may have been in an area that allowed much more gamma radiation to exit than neutron radiation.

I stand by my original assertion, but I add that this appears to be a relatively minor release now, at least from the point of affecting areas far from the scene. Gamma radiation is localized; there may be reports of sickness, possibly even death (it actually does mimic a microwave oven in many ways), but they are local to the affected site.

TheRedneck



posted on Mar, 12 2011 @ 08:39 PM
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Originally posted by Ektar
BREAKING NEWS: Fukushima plant radiation briefly at 1,204 micro sievert: Edano (11:23)
BREAKING NEWS: Top of MOX fuel rods 3 meters above water at Fukushima plant: TEPCO (11:06)


I think I just hear the same thing on CNN?
Either way, neither of those two statements sound good (especially the second one, I can't really quantify the first-one).

PS: Since they're quoting TEPCO, I'll go back and check their site again. That might actually be old news.

edit on 2011-3-12 by EnhancedInterrogator because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 12 2011 @ 08:39 PM
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reply to post by EnhancedInterrogator
 


The highest reading I seen on there is equivalent to about 38mR/H

Not something to freak out about.
If you panic, then run, you may trip n fall, and actually hurt yourself.

If I had to work all day in that level of radiation, I doubt that I would even be concerned about it enough to have it even cross my mind.



posted on Mar, 12 2011 @ 08:46 PM
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Kyodo had said earlier that 500 micro sievert / hr was
allowable human exposure...hope that was right as I can't find it there now...

Ektar

Hourly radiation at the site was measured at 882 micro sievert, in excess of the allowable level of 500.

Source english.kyodonews.jp...
edit on 12-3-2011 by Ektar because: Found related info



posted on Mar, 12 2011 @ 08:46 PM
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One of those Tepco release that hadn't been translated before, just showed-up on their English page now ...
Occurrence of a Specific Incident Stipulated in Article 15, Clause 1 of the Act on Special Measures Concerning Nuclear Emergency Preparedness

Basically, it says (if I understand correctly), that Reactor #1 is still F__ed, and now so is Reactor #3.

Afterwards, in Unit 3, High Pressure Core Injection System has been automatically shut down. Re-activation of Reactor Core Isolation Cooling System was attempted but failed, and as we were unable to confirm the level of water injection to the reactor by the Emergency Core Cooling System, at 5:10 on March 13th, it was determined that a specific incident (Emergency Core Cooling System water injection inability) stipulated in article 15, clause 1 has occurred.


Note: As always, emphasis in the quoted text added by the poster (i.e. me)

There's that same "unable to confirm" verbiage we saw yesterday about Reactor #1, being used to describe the situation with Reactor #3. As I said before, "unable to confirm" is typically a nice way of saying "don't f__ing know".

More: In hindsight, it seems like these Tepco press-releases actually have good information in them, if you know how to read through the political-correct double-speak, and accept that they are always delayed (not just for translation for English, but long before that after they figure-out that previously just happened).

edit on 2011-3-12 by EnhancedInterrogator because: more.



posted on Mar, 12 2011 @ 08:51 PM
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Originally posted by EnhancedInterrogator
Ok, I took a stab at the Japanese Tempco press-release page, and came-up with this (largely courtesy of Google-Translate) ...

Sounds like this is what the current television press-conference is talking about!

The release is entitled "Current status of Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station - 10 minutes at 8 am;"
Here's some of the Google-Trasnlated text ...

Since we report on the status of a report based on the rules set forth in Article 10 Tokyo Electric Power Company Nuclear Disaster Special Measures Law on March 13, 2011. For more information, please see the attachment below. - Appendix: Measurement of car status monitoring Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station (PDF 22.6KB)

Here's the link to the PDF attachment (in Japanese) ...
PDF attachment with radiation readings

Maybe 'Homer' can take a look at that, and see what's up.


edit on 2011-3-12 by EnhancedInterrogator because: spelling, grammar, formatting, etc.


Yay Homer! C'mon!



posted on Mar, 12 2011 @ 08:51 PM
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Originally posted by masqua
Good question. Always was something I wondered about as well. Trying to prove a point?



And I see from that source:


Starting October 22, 2008, Unit 2 was taken offline for approximately two days due to a rapid influx of jellyfish at the intake

Well I guess anything is possible. So hypothetically their contingency plans could go astray should hoards of sea life decide to take up residence near their intake points.


The other thing of concern here is the truthfulness and accuracy of the plant officials themselves:


Plant operator TEPCO has had a rocky past in an industry plagued by scandal. In 2002, the president of the country's largest power utility was forced to resign along with four other senior executives, taking responsibility for suspected falsification of nuclear plant safety records.

src
Falsifying safety records at that level, wow. Who do you trust ?

brill
edit on 12-3-2011 by brill because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 12 2011 @ 08:52 PM
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So wait, how can we believe all of these readings of radiation being so low and unconcerning, yet random people tested in the hospitals have been exposed to significant radiation? Doesn't that mean that many more have been exposed, and they were exposed far outside the plant's boundaries? Doesn't it mean that some sort of bad leak of one form or another has taken place, and the levels are not safe? Or am I misinterpreting those bits of info?



posted on Mar, 12 2011 @ 08:53 PM
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Originally posted by brill
Who do you trust ?

It should go without saying, but ...
... trust no-one.



posted on Mar, 12 2011 @ 08:55 PM
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reply to post by 00nunya00
 

Sounds like these are reading taken at regular basis a pre-determined points in or around the plant. Sounds like pretty routine stuff to me. It doesn't necessarily mean nothing extraordinary happened beyond that - just it didn't show in these readings.



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