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Japan declares 'nuclear emergency' after quake

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posted on Mar, 20 2011 @ 03:44 PM
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reply to post by EnhancedInterrogator
 



The thickness of the steel in those tanks will provide some measure of shielding. It's all relative to the dose rate.




posted on Mar, 20 2011 @ 03:48 PM
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reply to post by ethancoop
 


There is actually more danger in the spent fuel pits. The spent fuel is highly radioactive. It is also unshielded except for the water, and not contained like the reactor itself. The fact that a spent fuel pit is still changing and filtering water is very important to the safety it contents and those around it.



posted on Mar, 20 2011 @ 03:53 PM
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Hello everyone. Sorry I'm late, personal issues you know.

reply to post by ljonesyuk

Worrying is like a rocking horse , it gives you something to do but gets you nowhere.

There is a difference between worrying and monitoring. The former is, indeed, useless. The latter can mean the difference between life and death in a bad enough situation.

TheRedneck



posted on Mar, 20 2011 @ 03:53 PM
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Got this from a Jiji News posting ...

[JiJi News] Japan Starts Posting Nationwide Radiation Monitoring Data


Tokyo, March 20 (Jiji Press)--The Japanese government has started disclosing online radiation monitoring data collected in various parts of the country's 47 prefectures.
The data, such as radiation levels in the air and amounts of radioactive substances in tap water, rain and dust, are accessible through the Web site of the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology. Its URL is [see below]
Those data are also available in English, Chinese and Korean.


Here's the resulting link from the "Ministry of Education [blah, blah, blah], Science & Technology"
Reading of environmental radioactivity level

Here's the currently latest-available readings ...
19:00 Mar 20, 2011 (PDF:135KB)

PS: I guess there was enough pressure coming to release this stuff now, or because there was so much "unofficial" monitoring they felt like they had to counter it? Either way, should have been releasing it all along.

edit on 2011-3-20 by EnhancedInterrogator because: added post-script



posted on Mar, 20 2011 @ 03:54 PM
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TOKYO, March 21 - (Kyodo) Spinach with radioactive iodine 27 times more than the government-regulated limit was found in the city of Hitachi in Ibaraki Prefecture, more than 100 kilometers south of the crippled Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant, but the radiation levels do not affect human health, local authorities said Sunday


from Kyodo news here

Now all we need to know is what IS the regulated limit, I believe its 100 milli seiverts per person per year (unless involved with saving of populations,where its 250 milli sverts.
edit on 20-3-2011 by bitbytebit because: eta 100 per person per year


after seeing previous post link, maybe im wrong about the gov regulated limits
edit on 20-3-2011 by bitbytebit because: after seeing previous post link, maybe im wrong about the gov regulated limits



posted on Mar, 20 2011 @ 03:58 PM
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reply to post by ljonesyuk

I have read some of the posts by mr redneck , he certainly sounds like a very informed person .
I just don't take one persons view , all be it very informative , as the alarm bell to dig out the back garden .

If you have read all my posts, then you are aware I have suggested no one panic outside of Japan. I only had one concern internationally, and that never happened.

North America will probably be spared any but the slightest hint of radiation, and that far less that background radiation (too low to even be accurately measured). Europe will have even less concern. But just because the disaster is limited to Japan (and of course the surrounding oceans) does not mean it is less a disaster. That's still a lot of innocent people that will see high radiation exposures.

TheRedneck



posted on Mar, 20 2011 @ 04:01 PM
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Originally posted by Hugues de Payens
reply to post by ethancoop
 


There is actually more danger in the spent fuel pits. The spent fuel is highly radioactive. It is also unshielded except for the water, and not contained like the reactor itself. The fact that a spent fuel pit is still changing and filtering water is very important to the safety it contents and those around it.


I'm quite aware of that since I've been following this thread for some time now. My question had nothing to do with the danger posed by the spent fuel pool but why they would go feel to need to point out that 5 & 6 are in cool shutdown as that has nothing to do with the spent fuel pools does it? This whole time the only problem I've been aware of at 5 & 6 was the spent fuel pool heating up. I'm just assuming that cold shutdown is pertaining to the reactor itself but if the reactors never were in question here then why point out the fact they're safe?
edit on 20-3-2011 by ethancoop because: (no reason given)

edit on 20-3-2011 by ethancoop because: fixin stuff



posted on Mar, 20 2011 @ 04:07 PM
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Originally posted by TheRedneck
reply to post by ljonesyuk

I have read some of the posts by mr redneck , he certainly sounds like a very informed person .
I just don't take one persons view , all be it very informative , as the alarm bell to dig out the back garden .

If you have read all my posts, then you are aware I have suggested no one panic outside of Japan. I only had one concern internationally, and that never happened.

North America will probably be spared any but the slightest hint of radiation, and that far less that background radiation (too low to even be accurately measured). Europe will have even less concern. But just because the disaster is limited to Japan (and of course the surrounding oceans) does not mean it is less a disaster. That's still a lot of innocent people that will see high radiation exposures.

TheRedneck


This is the conclusion I have come to as well, and I am kind of sad to say that since I have more or less assured myself that I personally have nothing to fear, it has shifted my pity and heartache to the people of Japan, where it should have been all along.

I don't feel there is an active coverup, I think there are a lot of unknowns and of course hopeful optimism. Specific numbers may be fake or missing, but visual and scientific evidence is public knowledge.

I have read that most of the search and rescue teams have left, this is unusual until you realize that radiation is involved. I am not sure where to donate at this point and am waiting.

Unity_99 I hope your concerns have been allied regarding the amounts of radiation that will inevitably spread, this chart may help. chart

positive thoughts for Japan.



posted on Mar, 20 2011 @ 04:11 PM
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reply to post by ethancoop
 


I totally agree, and was saying to my husband when he mentioned this "news" when I woke up-----it sounds like they're just stating the status of shut down at 5 and 6 because it *sounds* like it's a good development to those who haven't been paying much attention, but to those who have, it's not a lie because it's still true---they're in cold shutdown, nothing has changed. Win-win.



posted on Mar, 20 2011 @ 04:13 PM
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Further grim warnings are given in tonight's Four Corners by nuclear experts and activists who have been interviewed over the past week. American Damon Moglen, director of Friends Of The Earth's climate and energy project, points to the presence of as much as a quarter of a tonne of plutonium in Fukushima's No. 3 reactor, which suffered an explosion last Monday. "The problem there is, if that plutonium fuel is melting inside the core, if it's being vented out or if an explosion were to break the containment open, we could have - and we have as much as a quarter of a tonne of additional plutonium in that reactor - we could have radioactive releases containing plutonium, which would be just yet another horror to have to deal with," he said.

www.abc.net.au...

Well, it's horror enough as it is right now, let's hope for the best. The situation is already much worse as the media let you believe.



posted on Mar, 20 2011 @ 04:15 PM
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Originally posted by TheRedneck
There is a difference between worrying and monitoring. The former is, indeed, useless. The latter can mean the difference between life and death in a bad enough situation.

TheRedneck


Yes - for sure. Someone once told me: "Worrying is like praying for the wrong thing" - - in other words unnecessary negative energy.

Awareness and Knowledge - - however - - is never useless or without merit.



posted on Mar, 20 2011 @ 04:20 PM
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reply to post by cosmicpixie

In some ways, pressure fluctuations up and down are worse than simply high pressures. There are only two ways to lower the pressure inside the reactor: venting and cooling. Of the two, cooling works far slower and is harder to achieve, because enough heat has to be removed from the vessel to overcome the latent heat of evaporation before steam can become water again.

Venting can take place either controlled, as in using the venting valve system, or uncontrolled via leaks in the vessel. If the pressure is fluctuating, it is unlikely that heat is being transferred out and created within in sufficient amounts to cause said fluctuations. The effect would have to therefore be due to venting, and we know from the reports that controlled venting is not occurring.

The pressure releases have to be coming from a fracture that only exhibits itself under pressure... a pressure crack. I know of no other mechanism that can account for these reports. That is worrying because pressure cracks are short-lived, becoming simply open fractures quickly. That is a core breach, and will continue to emit radiation based on its size and location, as well as preventing proper water levels to stabilize and allow for cooling.

Core breaches are bad things.

TheRedneck



posted on Mar, 20 2011 @ 04:21 PM
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reply to post by EnhancedInterrogator
 


Here's also a map to keep tract of radiation levels in Japan: www.bousai.ne.jp...



posted on Mar, 20 2011 @ 04:22 PM
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Originally posted by ethancoop
I was under the impression that 5 & 6 weren't active at the time of the quake. Why do they need to point out they are in cold shutdown? I know they were having spent fuel cooling pool trouble but that has nothing to do with the actual reactor.
edit on 20-3-2011 by ethancoop because: (no reason given)


Neither was Unit 4 active.
Unlike 4, 5 and 6 are still fueled. They were showing rising temperatures which was a cause for concern. According to the report they are now stabilized and being properly cooled.



posted on Mar, 20 2011 @ 04:23 PM
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reply to post by checkmeout

The half-life of the radioactive particles only has real meaning when the particles are no longer replenished. As long as radiation is spewing from the plant in greater amounts than what is decaying, the effect of the decay is not enough to counter the additional radiation. It gets worse.

Once radiation emission is stopped, then half-life based decay will begin to actually lower the radiation over time.

TheRedneck



posted on Mar, 20 2011 @ 04:24 PM
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off-topic post removed to prevent thread-drift


 



posted on Mar, 20 2011 @ 04:24 PM
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Originally posted by TheRedneck
reply to post by cosmicpixie

In some ways, pressure fluctuations up and down are worse than simply high pressures. There are only two ways to lower the pressure inside the reactor: venting and cooling. Of the two, cooling works far slower and is harder to achieve, because enough heat has to be removed from the vessel to overcome the latent heat of evaporation before steam can become water again.

Venting can take place either controlled, as in using the venting valve system, or uncontrolled via leaks in the vessel. If the pressure is fluctuating, it is unlikely that heat is being transferred out and created within in sufficient amounts to cause said fluctuations. The effect would have to therefore be due to venting, and we know from the reports that controlled venting is not occurring.

The pressure releases have to be coming from a fracture that only exhibits itself under pressure... a pressure crack. I know of no other mechanism that can account for these reports. That is worrying because pressure cracks are short-lived, becoming simply open fractures quickly. That is a core breach, and will continue to emit radiation based on its size and location, as well as preventing proper water levels to stabilize and allow for cooling.

Core breaches are bad things.

TheRedneck


And this is the MOX fuel reactor right? Typically harder to control that regular fuel reactors. If the core slumps out through the fracture and onto the floor and connects with water is there any danger of an explosion?



posted on Mar, 20 2011 @ 04:25 PM
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Originally posted by TheRedneck
Once radiation emission is stopped, then half-life based decay will begin to actually lower the radiation over time.
TheRedneck


NOVA documentary said Chernobyl needs a tomb that will last longer than the pyramids... 100,000 years


edit on 20-3-2011 by zorgon because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 20 2011 @ 04:29 PM
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reply to post by zorgon
 


At the pace they are going and considering the speed at which they eat up funds , it will also take longer than the pyramids to build it



posted on Mar, 20 2011 @ 04:30 PM
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reply to post by Regenmacher
 

I've seen that one before.
Is it actually getting updated now?
Before it was just showing the same (old) data.




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