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Japan declares 'nuclear emergency' after quake

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posted on Mar, 19 2011 @ 03:34 AM
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The so-called 'Fukushima 50' (workers who are trying to save the stricken nuclear plant) are fighting nuclear fallout covered in duct tape, according the The Daily Telegraph. www.telegraph.co.uk


live.reuters.com...


what duct tape? hmm who know it works against radiation. i guess it does do everything




posted on Mar, 19 2011 @ 03:38 AM
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Originally posted by okiecowboy
reply to post by Wertwog
 


I am not sure about that..going to try and do research now...brain isn't workin real good at this time of day...but I can promise you...I wouldn't want to be anywhere near those things....

and makes you wonder how spraying all that water in the pool is going to keep those things cool doesn't it??


Yep seeing as how they don't appear to be IN THE POOL, lol. More likely to just toss them around. Also, unless that water has boron it's an exercise in futility (if I understand RedNeck's post on this subject a while back). It's possibly dangerous to just be putting plain water on them as well as it could accelerate neurotic activity -- somebody correct me if I'm FOS here.



posted on Mar, 19 2011 @ 03:51 AM
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reply to post by TheRedneck
 


Pretty much as I expected. Thanks for the reply.

So. It took half a million people to build the Chernobyl sarcophagus. I'd bet nearly all are dead and probably have been for a while. Those left alive most likely aren't in great health, to say the least.

Even the robots died in the process.

Now it needs to be done on a much larger scale in AND be earthquake safe(if that even exists).

I'm thinking it's going to take much more than half a million people for this one. Helluva price for humanity to pay.

At this moment in time I'd be willing to go over and do whatever I could in the effort as my so called life is beyond sucky. But I'm just one person and they probably wouldn't take me anyway. It would require many people to forgo their lives for what basically amounts to a suicide mission. I wonder how many are willing to sacrifice their lives so that others may continue.

Anyway, first things first, as we need to cool it off before anything can happen and judging from the efforts so far it may take a while. Seriously, does anyone think dropping a few loads of water from a helo or the fire trucks now being used are really going to work? If any of these efforts aren't futile I'll eat my shoes.

I don't expect to be devouring footwear anytime soon. I have been known to be wrong and if so, I'll be needing some good sauces that go with leather. Any chefs around?



posted on Mar, 19 2011 @ 03:53 AM
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Encasing the whole thing like they did at Chernobyl would be ``insane``... since the current sarcophagus they are doing for Chernobyl is the ``largest movable structure ever built ``, it's almost three football fields across and 32 stories high... and IMO the one needed for the Fukushima plant would be even bigger.

Not to mention, the cost of such a thing, and the time to build it.



posted on Mar, 19 2011 @ 04:01 AM
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reply to post by Wertwog
 


I figured it out. It's a game of pick-up sticks for the Gods.

Sorry for the lame attempt at humor but it made me think of Terry Pratchett - "Thunder rolled. Thunder rolled a six". His Gods care not for humanity and I don't think ours do either. If any of them actually exist but that's a topic for another thread, another day.

If any of them do exist may they have mercy on us. We have committed one helluva frak-up this time.



posted on Mar, 19 2011 @ 04:07 AM
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Originally posted by Dyzan

The so-called 'Fukushima 50' (workers who are trying to save the stricken nuclear plant) are fighting nuclear fallout covered in duct tape, according the The Daily Telegraph. www.telegraph.co.uk


live.reuters.com...


what duct tape? hmm who know it works against radiation. i guess it does do everything


LOL the grammar there bugs me... is the fallout covered in duct tape or the workers? Hehe. Just being nitpicky. It never ceases to amaze me how easily we forget the lessons of the past. The Chernobyl solution of sending unprotected soliders to shovel sand into the gaping reactor hole. The soliders sitting around having laugh with their funny googles on and in their plain clothes as the first bomb was tested. Ann Coulter knows the truth... radiation is good for you!

Sorry if this picture is graphic...




FU Ann Coulter!

From: Chernobyl description


Most of these early casualties were firefighters who combated the blaze. The destroyed reactor liberated hundreds of times more radiation than was produced by the atomic bombings of Hroshima and Nagasaki. The intensity of gamma radiation on the site of the power plant reached more than 100 roentgens an hour. This level produces in an hour doses hundreds of times the maximum dose the International Commission on Radiological Protection recommends for members of the public a year. On the roof of the destroyed reactor building, radiation levels reached a frightening 100,000 roentgens an hour. The human dimensions of the tragedy are vast and heartbreaking. At the time of the accident, I was working as a medical researcher at the Institute of Epiderniology and Infectious Diseases in Kiev, some 60 miles from the Chomobyl plant. Sometime on April 26 a friend told me that people had been arriving at hospitals for treatment of burns sustained in an accident at the plant, but we had no idea of its seriousness. There was little official news during the next few days, and what there was suggested the danger was not great. The authorities jammed most foreign broadcasts, although we could listen as Swedish radio reported the detection of high levels of radioactivity in that country and elsewhere. I and some other physicians decided to drive toward the accident site to investigate and help as we could. We set off cheerfully enough, but as we got closer we started to see signs of mass panic. People with connections to officialdom had used their influence to send children away by air and rail. Others without special connections were waiting in long lines for tickets or occasionally storming trains to try to escape. Families had become split up. The only comparable social upheaval I had seen was during a cholera epidemic. Already many workers from the plant had been hospitalized. The distribution of the fallout was extremely patchy. One corner of a field might be highly dangerous, while just a few yards away levels seemed low. Nevertheless, huge areas were affected. Although iodine 131 has a half-life of only eight days, it caused large radiation exposures during the weeks immediately following the accident. Strontium 90 and cesium 137, on the other hand, are more persistent. Scientists believe it is the cesium that will account for the largest radiation doses in the long run. All told, well over 260,000 square kilometers of territory in Ukraine, Russia and Belarus still have more than one curie per square kilometer of contamination with cesium 137. At this level, annual health checks for radiation effects are advised for residents. In my own country of Ukraine, the total area with this level of contamination exceeds 35,000 square kilometers-more than 5 percent of the nation's total area. Most of this, 26,000 square kilometers, is arable land. In the worst affected areas there are restrictions on the use of crops, but less contaminated districts are still under cultivation. The heavily contaminated parts of Ukraine constitute 13 administrative regions (oblasts). In these oblasts are 1,300 towns and villages with a total population of 2.6 million, including 700,000 children. Within about 10 days of the accident, 135,000 people living in the worst-affected areas had left their homes; by now the total has reached 167,000. The medical consequences are, of course, the most serious. Some 30,000 people have fallen ill among the 400,000 workers who toiled as "liquidators," burying the most dangerous wastes and constructing a special building around the ruined reactor that is universally referred to as "the sarcophagus. " Of these sick people, about 5,000 are now too ill to work.


There is more and well worth looking in to, with some amazing similarities to how this is unfolding.





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posted on Mar, 19 2011 @ 04:12 AM
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Found a nice Statistic about the 7 oldest German Nuclear Plants which are beeing shut down temporaly:

Nuclear Plant / Activated / Malfunctions

Brunsbüttel / 1977 / 80
Isar I / 1979 / 44
Neckarwestheim 1 / 1976 / 47
Philippsburg I / 1980 / 39
Biblis A / 1974 / 66
Biblis B / 1976 / 78
Unterweser / 1978 / 49

Scary huh?

edit on 19-3-2011 by Shenon because: spenglisch



posted on Mar, 19 2011 @ 04:16 AM
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Originally posted by AlaskanDad

They have also been showing a concrete pump truck


edit on 19-3-2011 by AlaskanDad because: code mistake on a img

edit on 19-3-2011 by AlaskanDad because: (no reason given)


Seven hours of spraying. Certainly not just to fill the original spent fuel pond. That's gone at n.3
and the rods scattered around.
I guess they just filled the entire concrete structure with water in those 7 hours, used what's left of the entire building, as if it was a giant pond


Originally posted by TheRedneck
Why am I getting this feeling that something big is going to happen tomorrow on this?

Nothing at all scientific, just a hunch that has been bothering me for a while now... might be indigestion...


TheRedneck



Let's see if Redneck's gut feeling was right.
But i have the opposite feeling. We will know the full extent of this disaster only by looking back at the cumulative effect of this prolongued crisis. Fukushima will be releasing that stuff slowly but surely for months. This is what we should be worried about, in my view, not a big bang.
This would seem to be in line with a level 5 rating.
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posted on Mar, 19 2011 @ 04:33 AM
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reply to post by TheLoony
 


The way I see it, "God" being the entire living Universe, we are a very very small cell in that living Universe...a cell that has failed.



posted on Mar, 19 2011 @ 04:57 AM
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W7VOA Fukushima gov''t tells VOA at 1800JST Sat.rad level was 21.80µSv/h in Iitate, 40km NW of nuke plant. At 1600JST Friday there: 21.40µSv/h.


W7VOA These reading would make it reasonable to conclude spraying effort at plant not reducing rad level outside evac. zone.

Duh.

Nuclear safety agency: electricity cables have been connected No. 1, No. 2 reactors of Fukushima plant - Kyodo

Still need to do something about fixing those reactors...

Really really really disgusting :
Priorities? 400 CNN Reporters Cover Royal Wedding…50 Cover Japan Quake

Covering those inbreds scumbags calling themselves ``the royal family`` wedding... CNN, you make me puke.
edit on 19-3-2011 by Vitchilo because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 19 2011 @ 05:08 AM
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Good morning everyone! (ok, actually it's 13:00 already but I just woke up
)

Read fresh report from TEPCO -



At Units 5 and 6, in order to prevent hydrogen gas from accumulating within the buildings, we have made three holes on the roof of the reactor building for each unit


www.tepco.co.jp...

also some good news - generators at #5 and #6 are repaired and staring to work.

Also JAIF report, here - www.jaif.or.jp...



BTW, any news about concrete and sarcophagus?
edit on 19-3-2011 by AstraCat because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 19 2011 @ 05:28 AM
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Japan’s Response to Reactor Crisis Delayed by Concern Over Asset Damage

The gist of this article is that TEPCO refused to take certain measures early on the crisis (e.g., pumping sea water) because they wanted to salvage the reactor and they didn't want to harm their 'investment'.

I guess money is more important than human lives. Sick.



posted on Mar, 19 2011 @ 05:29 AM
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reply to post by AstraCat
 


thanks for the update Astracat

They don't mention temperatures.
Last thing I heard is that temperature at n.4 could not be measured since the 13th of march

www.facebook.com...

Unit 4 13 March, 19:08 UTC: 84 °C (update dated march 18th)


Today's update on IAEA fb page does not contain info on temperature either, as far as I can tell.

www.facebook.com...

I thought I heard that temperature was down but I am seeing conflicting info and can't find all the sources



posted on Mar, 19 2011 @ 05:31 AM
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Another quake just hit by the Nuclear Power Plant!


1025: There are still no reports of damage following the 6.1-magnitude quake that hit Ibaraki prefecture. Japan has been hit by hundreds of aftershocks since 11 March, many strong, but this one may cause additional concern as its epicentre is close to the damaged nuclear plant at Fukushima

BBC

I really hope this does not stop the efforts at the lant or make things worse.

Elf



posted on Mar, 19 2011 @ 05:33 AM
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Have a look at page 3 of JAIF report (a link in my last post) very interesting table with accidents on each reactor with time lines.
edit on 19-3-2011 by AstraCat because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 19 2011 @ 05:49 AM
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reply to post by monica86
 


It's at 84 degrees. On the page below there are two tables giving temp readings from 14th-18th for untis 4, 5 and 6. You'll have to scroll down to find them. All except 4 according to them have had slight temp increases in the past 5 days. It goes up a little each day. I read somewhere temps have to reach 1,000 degress before criticality occurs ?

here



posted on Mar, 19 2011 @ 05:52 AM
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Originally posted by monica86
Let's see if Redneck's gut feeling was right.
But i have the opposite feeling. We will know the full extent of this disaster only by looking back at the cumulative effect of this prolongued crisis. Fukushima will be releasing that stuff slowly but surely for months. This is what we should be worried about, in my view, not a big bang.
This would seem to be in line with a level 5 rating.


I also feel that this will be long and drawn out. The earthquake/tsunami clean up compounding efforts to clean up and secure the nuclear facility.

It's just a few short months till Pacific typhoon season begins. It's not a certainty and the Fukushima area is pretty far north, still if it is true that the pictures we've recently seen are in fact spent fuel rods scattered about the facility it leaves a potential for a typhoon to just come along and snatch it up. The idea of a radioactive storm a couple hundred miles across is scarier than the tuk tuk ride I just took back to the hotel.

I'd like to know when the time comes that the efforts by those cleaning this bad boy up are motivated to work quickly, yet provide a lasting solution. At least one that can handle a cat 5 typhoon. Go big or go home I think some said earlier.

I keep playing out in my mind so many scenarios of how this will progress. I'm really attempting to take a step back now and just look at what verifiable information comes out in the next few days. Still, this has been such a good and demanding discussion to fuel the brain.

Soul



posted on Mar, 19 2011 @ 05:57 AM
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If only...

IMHO, they need to rate new technologies in the same way software updates are rated.

For example, new reactor designs might be rated "important" yet a particular cooling system which stops a meltdown and is foolproof, that may be rated "crucial" and is an upgrade which all existing plants must implement, whereas "important" upgrades must be incorporated into all new designs.. We do it with cars. ABS brakes, Air bags.. Yet we dont with power plants.



posted on Mar, 19 2011 @ 05:57 AM
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reply to post by AstraCat
 


This may be the first actual hope news against our human implications contained within Japan's plight...the generators are working on two of the housings containing our nuclear energy! This should help right?

That gives me hope for the first time in this disaster, only if its true now.This planetary harmful energy and intentional possible side effects must have been known, if I did that! Liability would be uncontrollable within the laws of the "lawful" system.

Fine, I say they can't do that to my planet either and would rather live without the knowledge shared on the internet.



posted on Mar, 19 2011 @ 06:21 AM
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reply to post by cosmicpixie
 


That's the same reading that I mentioned (taken on the 13th of march)


Originally posted by monica86
reply to post by AstraCat
 



Last thing I heard is that temperature at n.4 could not be measured since the 13th of march

www.facebook.com...

Unit 4 13 March, 19:08 UTC: 84 °C (update dated march 18th)





Actually the page that you link seems even stranger.
If you scroll down to the 16th of march , they state that they had measured 84 degrees on the 14th and the 15th of march.
Howver , further up, in the latest update on temparatures, dated 18th of march, they state ( in a similar table) that the last time temperature has been measured at n. 4 is on the 13th of march
Always 84 degrees....

mmm
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