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Japan declares 'nuclear emergency' after quake

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posted on Mar, 18 2011 @ 11:12 PM
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Originally posted by TheRedneck
Why am I getting this feeling that something big is going to happen tomorrow on this?

Nothing at all scientific, just a hunch that has been bothering me for a while now... might be indigestion...


TheRedneck


Yeah - - I'm here on the west coast now. Not picking up anything on earthquake.

Feel more like an explosion in Japan.




posted on Mar, 18 2011 @ 11:17 PM
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reply to post by TheRedneck
 


I think you mean divided by 10...in other words one would say 500CPM and the other 50CPM



posted on Mar, 18 2011 @ 11:23 PM
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Radiation levels 1/2km from No3 reactor: 5,000 microsieverts per hour at 5pm yesterday and 3,181 uSv/hr at 2am this morning.

At 5000, for one year it's 43.8 silvert. Way too much. Even at 3181, it's still 27.86 silvert for one year, still way too much.


TEPCO says it should have electricity back to the 1, 2, 5, 6 reactors today and to 3 and 4 tomorrow at the Fukushima nuclear plant.

Right...

Out of almost 15,000 evacuated Fukushima residents measured for radiation, 43 have been determined to need "full-body decontamination."



Morgues and crematoriums are being overwhelmed in quake-hit areas.


edit on 18-3-2011 by Vitchilo because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 18 2011 @ 11:28 PM
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reply to post by Mianeye

So far as anyone knows, there is no maximum temperature, unless you count the vaporization temperature of uranium dioxide... which my chemistry book doesn't list.... I assume it is pretty high. It would depend on how much fuel is there to react, since the half-life property of uranium decrees that half of whatever is available will decay in a certain time frame, and mass increases this through increased chain reaction.

Realistically, I'd say there is no maximum temperature that we can imagine.

TheRedneck



posted on Mar, 18 2011 @ 11:33 PM
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reply to post by TheRedneck
 


Ty


No numbers, but the info i needed.



posted on Mar, 18 2011 @ 11:35 PM
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reply to post by RickyD

Neither is related to the other in any way; that is the problem with CPM. It is relative only to previous/future reading on the same meter.

Think of it like everyone in the world making their own measuring tapes based on what they think an inch should be. You couldn't compare anything, because one man's inch might be another's 10 inches.

Yeah, ridiculous, I know.

TheRedneck



posted on Mar, 18 2011 @ 11:38 PM
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Not under control, not getting better. I wonder how far they are expanding the evac area?

www.bbc.co.uk...
0422: The US State Department is strongly urging Americans in Japan to consider leaving and advising those who were planning to go to Japan to defer the trip. The US is also expanding the area for voluntary evacuations for family members of US personnel in Japan.
edit on 18-3-2011 by premierepastimes because: more text



posted on Mar, 18 2011 @ 11:38 PM
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After all, might be a new explosion at reactor 2... we'll see if it's real.

Contradicting info... might be old news or might be a new explosion.
edit on 18-3-2011 by Vitchilo because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 18 2011 @ 11:40 PM
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reply to post by TheRedneck
 




Think of it like everyone in the world making their own measuring tapes based on what they think an inch should be. You couldn't compare anything, because one man's inch might be another's 10 inches.



And then change tape measures several times while building that one house..


NO MATTER the numbers they use..the story falls apart...If the rods are exposed...and I feel they are...they are lying about the radiation levels....

If radiation lvls are low enought not to cause harm...then why are we treating people??



posted on Mar, 18 2011 @ 11:41 PM
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Originally posted by TheRedneck
reply to post by Mianeye

So far as anyone knows, there is no maximum temperature, unless you count the vaporization temperature of uranium dioxide... which my chemistry book doesn't list.... I assume it is pretty high. It would depend on how much fuel is there to react, since the half-life property of uranium decrees that half of whatever is available will decay in a certain time frame, and mass increases this through increased chain reaction.

Realistically, I'd say there is no maximum temperature that we can imagine.

TheRedneck

Like,say the sun.pretty hot.
Just hope it doesn't melt through the crust.

In reallity this probably going to go down as the worst human caused disaster in
our long history.And don't say it's natures fault,cause nature didn't build those
nuclear reactors.
Has anyone mentioned critical mass?



posted on Mar, 18 2011 @ 11:49 PM
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reply to post by TheRedneck
 


I'd have to agree with you here. I'm feeling pretty much at my norm here, but speaking to the family today back in Okinawa they mentioned the cat has gone absolutely ballistic. Pretty much exactly the performance he gave last March when we took a 7.0 magnitude 35 nm off our east coast. (No tsunami produced)

If it is a case of a repeat, I'd much rather we take it down there, because we weathered that well. The infastructure there seems to really be built for it. I'd be concerned of course of higher magnitudes. I don't have details but I'm sure Oki is turning into a refuge for many mainlanders and also a staging point for relief operations.

Soul



posted on Mar, 18 2011 @ 11:49 PM
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What I haven't seen discussed enough is the non-linear nature of nuclear reactions. Basically, if a criticality event occurs, the amount of heat and radiation released will increase exponentially and we are talking about entirely new levels of badness. The difference between where we are now and criticality could be just one tiny uranium fuel pellet spilling out of a fuel rod casing, and landing on a pile that had been growing on the floor below...



posted on Mar, 18 2011 @ 11:50 PM
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Originally posted by TheRedneck
reply to post by okiecowboy

Here's one big problem... CPM = ???

CPM is a relative measurement, not an absolute one like Sieverts or Rems. One machine can say 234 CPM and the one next to it can say 8746 CPM and both be right. The only way these readings are connected is that if the radiation in that example were cut in half, the first one would say 117 CPM and the second would say 4373 CPM.

CPM is useless unless comparing it with other CPM readings on the same meter. I just saw one report that claimed their CPM was equivalent to mR/hr., but that would be because they calibrated their instruments to read that way.

Just please don't ask me why they are using such a useless method for measurement... I really have no idea.

TheRedneck


They are using CPM in that example because they are doing decontamination of people. They are not measuring radioactivity. They are not intending to either. They have the beta/alpha windows open, and they are looking for the hottest spot on the person.

The total calibrated level of radioactivity is not of concern.

They are holding the window right up to the surface being checked to try and find the highest reading.

They roughly set an arbitrary CPM value as a threshold for implementing additional decontamination and monitoring of that person.

That CPM doesn’t depend on the type of radiation being detected. And that arbitrary value is only valid for that style of detection probe (usually pancake).

When you are dealing with radioactive material on a person or object, then the whole “level of radioactivity” goes out the window. You just know that there is radioactive stuff on the person, and you need to get it cleaned off. The dividing line between “need to clean off” and “don’t need to clean.” Is arbitrary and may be moved depending on outstanding circumstances.

The levels (if properly measured) are usually too low to be of concern if they wasn’t “On the person!!!!!”

If that reading was 30,000 CPM.
That would equate to 500CPS.
Most probes range from 10 to 100 CPS/mRem/Hr.
So the reading would be somewhere from 5 to 50mRem if it was pure gamma radiation.
But the reading isn’t from pure gamma radiation.
And the reading was taken from zero distance.
So it would barely read anything if you held the probe at a calibrated distance.
But all of this is beside the point because they are doing decontamination, not a radiation survey.
Different (more arbitrary) rules apply in decontamination.
There is normally not enough material on the person to give a true radiation field to measure.



posted on Mar, 18 2011 @ 11:51 PM
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Originally posted by Vitchilo
After all, might be a new explosion at reactor 2... we'll see if it's real.

Contradicting info... might be old news or might be a new explosion.
edit on 18-3-2011 by Vitchilo because: (no reason given)


Any confirmation on that Vitchilo? I can't seem to find anything on it. Perhaps it's a false alarm.



posted on Mar, 18 2011 @ 11:52 PM
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reply to post by Soulwarrior

I'm really hoping it's indigestion.... really. I have indigestion a lot (probably because I eat stuff that would make a billy goat puke). Tell your cat to calm down... please?

Japan doesn't need more right now.

TheRedneck



posted on Mar, 18 2011 @ 11:54 PM
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Hey Redneck, gotta say, many thanks for all you have done. If Obama got a Nobel for doing nothing methinks you deserve way more. Big-big kudos to ya.

I've been thinking about the entombment scenario.Chernobyl was only one reactor and look at how difficult that was to do.This is a much larger area. Once this is cooled off, if it ever is, do you think a sarcophagus is even possible? If not, what is your best guess as to what will be done? It seems to me that if that is what is done it will take many months and that doesn't bode well IMO. Seems like a long time for that plant to go on leaking like it is.

As we have seen at Chernobyl, even that is a stop-gap measure and will not completely fix the situation, if there is such a thing as fixing this.I doubt that but I'm just a layman so I wouldn't know.

Ugh, this whole thing is such a mess.



posted on Mar, 18 2011 @ 11:55 PM
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reply to post by Mr Tranny

We finally agree.


Nice info in that post... taught me a few things. Thanks!

TheRedneck



posted on Mar, 18 2011 @ 11:56 PM
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I've been thinking about this all day, i haven't posted much, just been thinking. When they apply power to that plant, and try to power up their systems, i have a terrible feeling it will be like waking a sleeping monster. With all the damage, who knows what could happen. Sensors, piping, its all in disarray.

I really hope i'm wrong. Very wrong. The last thing these people need is more destruction.



posted on Mar, 18 2011 @ 11:58 PM
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reply to post by TheLoony

I don't think there is anything outside of a sarcophagus that will bring a (semi) end to this ordeal. The only question is, how cool can the fuel be before they can entomb it and how well will the entombment work this time? There is a lot more fuel here than there was in Chernobyl.

TheRedneck



posted on Mar, 18 2011 @ 11:58 PM
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Originally posted by PhysicsAlive
What I haven't seen discussed enough is the non-linear nature of nuclear reactions. Basically, if a criticality event occurs, the amount of heat and radiation released will increase exponentially and we are talking about entirely new levels of badness. The difference between where we are now and criticality could be just one tiny uranium fuel pellet spilling out of a fuel rod casing, and landing on a pile that had been growing on the floor below...


Now that's what I'm talking about.
Don't won't to freak everyone out ,
but it's like a nuclear bomb.
But it depends on the material and all.




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