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Japan declares 'nuclear emergency' after quake

page: 166.htm
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posted on Mar, 17 2011 @ 01:37 AM
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Originally posted by JackBauer
I agree the power issue was frustrating from the start. I've seen firsthand the semi trailers AT&T uses here in the states for disaster response. Those each produce up to 500kw. I can't believe japan didn't have anything like this. Even if the roads were blocked they could have airlifted the whole thing to the plant and sat it down in an opening. It just seems like such simple things were overlooked.


I agree that is a big mystery. We use them at conventions here in Vegas... installation and power feeds takes only hours to set up. Makes no sense. If they survive... heads will role over this mess.

Another thing I find hard to fathom... they keep showing snow and people freezing yet there is wood shattered all around... I see no fires started to provide warmth. The first thing I would do is make a small bonfire that people could get warmed up in front of. Back during the major eastern seaboard blackout I used the apartment incinerator in Toronto to heat water for people. Doesn't take much common sense to take a fuel drum and burn wood for heat. The homeless in America do that

They say they need gasoline, but I see no one taking it out of the gas tanks of the wrecked cars... makes no sense at all




posted on Mar, 17 2011 @ 01:37 AM
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reply to post by JackBauer
 


i know what you mean, i work in the music industry, i set up and tear down concerts, for most of the outdoor concerts that can't plug into the main grid, they wheel in these huge generators on flat beds
www.holtcat.com...

i dont see why they cant' wheel a few of those up there, i mean they did clear the roads right?

Of course its easy for us to sit here and arm chair quarterback, we still don't know all the information. All we know for real is that the plant is broken

edit on 17-3-2011 by Dyzan because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 17 2011 @ 01:37 AM
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Originally posted by JackBauer
I agree the power issue was frustrating from the start. I've seen firsthand the semi trailers AT&T uses here in the states for disaster response. Those each produce up to 500kw. I can't believe japan didn't have anything like this. Even if the roads were blocked they could have airlifted the whole thing to the plant and sat it down in an opening. It just seems like such simple things were overlooked.


Frustrating isn’t the words for it!!!!!
Here is the answer to their power supply problems in one freaking picture!!!!!!

www.utilitywarehouse.com...

The amount of air liftable, and mobile generation capacity that this one company is selling would take care of their power supply problems several times over!!!!!!

One unit would probably be enough!!!!!!!!!

Each one is 5.2MW, not Kw, 5.2 Mega watt!!!!!!!!!! 5,200,000 watts on tap!!!!! And they are fore sale as I type this!!!!!!!!!

I think I should email them ad tell them their may be a Japanese company that could really use them right now!!!!!!!!!

The capacity setting right there is about 1/10 of the total power output capability of the #1 reactor at full power. It would way outstrip both the plant’s backup generators put together. One of those units would probably outstrip both diesel generators at the plant.
edit on 17-3-2011 by Mr Tranny because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 17 2011 @ 01:43 AM
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reply to post by Unity_99
 


yeah 1800 microsievert=1.8 millisievert
Almost a years worth if that is true.



posted on Mar, 17 2011 @ 01:45 AM
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We have some tape if necessary. Just out of curiosity. If it does get high briefly, it would probably be for short period. How short? For example, how long to tape the doors and windows, and how long would one avoid drinking the tap water? Some precautions might be needed, though I really hope its much lower here than that.



posted on Mar, 17 2011 @ 01:46 AM
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reply to post by Mr Tranny
 


The story early on was that they has a large generator brought in but the plug didn't fit their system. As to why an electrician couldn't rectify this problem who knows.



posted on Mar, 17 2011 @ 01:48 AM
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reply to post by Unity_99
 


Just out of curiosity here. I must of missed it. Where are those readings from and where abouts(not exact location) are you? If you do not mind me asking?



posted on Mar, 17 2011 @ 01:49 AM
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reply to post by zorgon
 


Wet wood could be the culprit. Also we're not on the ground there so who's to say that's not happening in places we don't see.



posted on Mar, 17 2011 @ 01:49 AM
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Hello all, been lurking on here since it started this is my first post. Can someone please answer if the commonly used instruments for measuring radiation on the ground and in the air (Geiger counters and such) can and are currently measuring the radiation from the MOX fuel particulates. For example; is Anderson Cooper's dosimeter is measuring plutonium particulates or if these instruments are measuring gamma/alpha radiation? I realize he is too far away to receive gamma and alpha radiation but would it measure this if he were in the hot zone?

What I am getting at is how accurate are these "radiation" measurements we are getting if they do not pick up other kinds of radiation? If the cloud is heading our way (West Coast Vancouver CAN) how much radiation is in this cloud, or should we expect to be there given the "worst case" is in it given the MOX fuel? I read that the plutonium pellets of MOX fuel are a kind of compacted dust but elsewhere read that the element is quite heavy.

Should I really bug out and head east? When?

I saw this as well and am deeply concerned about sea life....

Journal of Environmental Radioactivity
Volume 36, Issue 1, 1997, Pages 69-83

Ken O. Buesseler

Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, Woods Hole, MA 02543, USA
Received 27 June 1996;
accepted 15 August 1996.
Available online 5 June 1998.

Plutonium analyses of a dated coral record from the French Frigate Shoals in the central North Pacific indicate that there are two major sources of Pu in this basin: close-in (tropospheric) fallout from nuclear weapons testing at the Pacific Proving Grounds in the Marshall Islands in the 1950s and global (stratospheric) fallout which peaked in 1962. Furthermore, the 240Pu/239Pu atom ratio of fallout from the Pacific Proving Grounds is characteristically higher (0.24) than that of global fallout Pu (0.18–0.19). Seawater and sediment samples from the North Pacific exhibit a wide range of 240Pu/239Pu values (0.19–0.34), with a trend towards higher ratios in the subsurface waters and sediment. Deep water 240Pu/239Pu ratios are higher in the vicinity of the Marshall Islands relative to stations further from this close-in fallout source. These preliminary data suggest that fallout Pu from the Pacific Proving Grounds is more rapidly removed from the surface waters than is global fallout Pu. Plutonium geochemistry appears to be related to the physical/chemical form of Pu-bearing particles generated by different fallout sources.
A
edit on 17-3-2011 by Wertwog because: the link wasn't allowed

edit on 17-3-2011 by Wertwog because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 17 2011 @ 01:51 AM
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This has current and past status of each reactor, use the arrows on each reactor window on the right to go back by days. Hope this is helpful.


Status of the Nuclear Reactors at the Fukushima Daiichi Power Plant

www.nytimes.com...



posted on Mar, 17 2011 @ 01:54 AM
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reply to post by liejunkie01
 


West coast area, just inland from Vancouver BC. And preparing for anything from a 0.1 to a 1.8 within roughly 40 hours.

The ham radio thing cannot be sourced. But my uncle has always had his ham radio, and he's talked to some very interesting people, even astronauts, as a physicist with his, so I was a little interested in the info.

If they're lying through their teeth, and I would faint with shock if they were telling the truth, then on a larger amount of radiation, knowing full well there are various isotopes and we're not sure what is coming exactly, still being prepared, ie. bottled water and food, and some good tape to seal up doors and windows is a great idea. But for how long?
edit on 17-3-2011 by Unity_99 because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 17 2011 @ 01:56 AM
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Originally posted by ethancoop
Wet wood could be the culprit.


Not buying that... having spent many days camping in rainstorms its not an issue once a fire is going



Also we're not on the ground there so who's to say that's not happening in places we don't see.


Yes I have seen a few and one covered area with a stack of firewood... so a few are doing it... but in general you don't see any of it in news reports

Just an observation



posted on Mar, 17 2011 @ 01:57 AM
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we already knew this was going on I think


March 17, 2011 The Passport Unit of the American Citizen Services section (Tokyo only) will be open on Saturday March 19, Sunday, March 20, and Monday March 21 in order to issue emergency passports to American Citizens. We will be open each day from 8:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. and from 2 p.m. to 5:30 p.m.


US Embassy Japan



posted on Mar, 17 2011 @ 01:57 AM
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reply to post by Dyzan
 


Agreed I too worked as a stagehand and it's crazy we have worked with all sorts of generators and feeder cables I mean they use em on movie sets all the time they are quick and easy to set up. I've heard of 1000s of yards of cable going in trenches in a day and that's only like 20-30 guys this is more botched than Katrina and that's a hard one to top!



posted on Mar, 17 2011 @ 01:58 AM
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And if people don’t want natural gas/propane powered ones, here is some liquid fuel powered ones (diesel/kerosene)

www.utilitywarehouse.com...

10.3MW trailer mounted, FOR SALE!!!!!!!!!

www.tradeleads.at...

23MW trailer mounted FOR SALE!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

cfaspower.com...

A whole pile of them from 5 to 10 MW, pick the one you like best.

Ow look……
cfaspower.com...

even more in the 10 to 20MW range……… SO many to chose from!!!!

I really think someone needs to show the reactor owners where they can get something to power their reactors!!!!!!!



posted on Mar, 17 2011 @ 02:00 AM
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reply to post by Wertwog
 

It has been discussed several times, and I believe the widespread view is that they can not detect some of the radiation coming from the Mox fuels



posted on Mar, 17 2011 @ 02:01 AM
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reply to post by Mr Tranny
 


Interestingly, along with providing self contained heliports and desalination facilities, both the USS Ronald Reagan and USS George Washington are capable of supplying gigawatts of shore side electricity from their own reactors.



posted on Mar, 17 2011 @ 02:02 AM
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I want one
I could take my neighborhood of the grid with one of those babies



posted on Mar, 17 2011 @ 02:02 AM
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reply to post by okiecowboy
 


You don't need to detect MOX because just one grain of sand size is enough to kill within 5 mins!



posted on Mar, 17 2011 @ 02:03 AM
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Earlier today I was watching NHK when they talked about the generator that had been brought to the site. It was stated it was low voltage and they used it to light some of the lights and gauges and the ran power to the pumps but it was to low in power to run them. If you look at before pictures of the plant you can see there is a very large discharge of water from this plant when running, it would take a very large amount of electricity to move that amount of water.

Been reading this thread for days and have found ATS one of the better sources of information on this event, great commentary and lots of up to date links.




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