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Japan declares 'nuclear emergency' after quake

page: 16.htm
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posted on Mar, 12 2011 @ 08:53 AM
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Those Facebook posts regarding 'karma'... gotta love them. Do they not realize what we did to Hiroshima and Nagasaki? Repaying Pearl Harbor over 100 fold... Almost 70 years later and these small minded people think that the grandchildren and great grandchildren should for some reason be 'paying' for Pearl Harbor.

These people make me sick.
edit on 12-3-2011 by Takamuri because: added more.

edit on 12-3-2011 by Takamuri because: typo




posted on Mar, 12 2011 @ 08:56 AM
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This is looking bad...


Television pictures showed a massive blast at one of the buildings of the Fukushima-Daiichi plant, about 250km (160 miles) north-east of Tokyo.

A huge cloud of smoke billowed out and large bits of debris were flung far from the building.
Source: www.bbc.co.uk...

That is a pretty hefty explosion to fling out debris... not simply a vent, The only thing that could cause such inside the reactor is superheated water from burning fuel, which also indicates a problem with the control rods. If the control rods are properly inserted, the amount of heat would probably not be sufficient to cause anything more than a cracking of the containment and venting of steam.


Japan's nuclear agency said earlier on Saturday that radioactive caesium and iodine had been detected near the number one reactor of the power station.

The agency said this could indicate that containers of uranium fuel inside the reactor may have begun melting.
Source: www.bbc.co.uk...

I hate to say this, but it appears to me that even those trying to show this in the best possible light are admitting that this is a major disaster for the area. It would take a tremendous amount of steam to create such an explosion, and that indicates that a lot of water has been affected... water that is now radioactive steam.

Hydrogen could have played a role, of course, but probably after a breach of the atmosphere... there just isn't that much oxygen inside. Also, if hydrogen was involved, it indicates the explosion came from inside the primary containment, not the secondary... primary containment is the sheath of concrete surrounding the reactor itself.

That link also reports that they are flooding the reactor with water. That is a last-ditch effort to cool it down, as it negates the containment offered by the dual water loops I mentioned before.

CNN just reported live that the fuel rods are exposed. Yes, this is a meltdown. Yes, we are looking at another Chernobyl.


No, it will probably not severely affect the US West Coast. Radiation levels there will at worst be slightly elevated for a while.

The thing is, all hope for some containment is not lost... Japan is apparently working hard to mitigate the damage and I wish them all the best in those efforts.

TheRedneck



posted on Mar, 12 2011 @ 09:00 AM
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Isn't it odd that:

1) CNN isn't horrified by the unprecedented number of strong aftreshocks

2) Doesn't have the nuclear issue on the home page

Oh wait they just put up story on pump over to the side.


edit on 3/12/2011 by trusername because: CNN finally put up story



posted on Mar, 12 2011 @ 09:03 AM
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reply to post by BobbyTarass

Meanwhile, in redneckland :

A bigoted introduction to a complaint about bigots...

Sad on sooooo many levels....

TheRedneck



posted on Mar, 12 2011 @ 09:06 AM
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According to a man that is into nuclear stuff on CNN awhile ago this will be #1 on the nuclear disaster list even if they can control things at this time, but if it keeps going we can expect much more problems. as of right now this is what they are showing if just one melt down happens, CNN is reporting now 5 nuclear plants are in danger of meltdown.





posted on Mar, 12 2011 @ 09:20 AM
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reply to post by pmbhuntress
 


Can you stop posting that map? It's a 4chan hoax.




reply to post by TheRedneck
 




CNN just reported live that the fuel rods are exposed. Yes, this is a meltdown. Yes, we are looking at another Chernobyl.

No it's not.

www.abovetopsecret.com...

www.abovetopsecret.com...

www.abovetopsecret.com...

FIlling the reactor with sea-water now:
online.wsj.com...

edit; made from who the quotes originate from more clear.
edit on 12/3/11 by C0bzz because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 12 2011 @ 09:31 AM
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1st time I ever posted it and you act like I have posted it a million times. Also you need to quit quoting things I have not said, I never said it would be another Chernobyl, that was someone else. Holy $hit keep posts straight and people to..



posted on Mar, 12 2011 @ 09:37 AM
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At least three people evacuated from a Japanese town near a quake-hit nuclear plant have been exposed to radiation. The three were randomly chosen for examination out of about 90 bedridden patients moved from a hospital in the town of Futaba-machi. Read more: www.news.com.au...



posted on Mar, 12 2011 @ 09:42 AM
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In a BWR, the containment strategy is a bit different. A BWR's containment consists of a drywell where the reactor and associated cooling equipment is located and a wetwell. The drywell is much smaller than a PWR containment and plays a larger role. During the theoretical leakage design basis accident the reactor coolant flashes to steam in the drywell, pressurizing it rapidly. Vent pipes or tubes from the drywell direct the steam below the water level maintained in the wetwell (also known as a torus or suppression pool), condensing the steam, limiting the pressure ultimately reached. Both the drywell and the wetwell are enclosed by a secondary containment building, maintained at a slight sub-atmospheric or negative pressure during normal operation and refueling operations. The containment designs are referred to by the names Mark I (oldest; drywell/torus), Mark II, and Mark III (newest). All three types house also use the large body of water in the suppression pools to quench steam released from the reactor system during transients.

From a distance, the BWR design looks very different from PWR designs because usually a square building is used for containment. Also, because there is only one loop through the turbines and reactor, and the steam going through the turbines is also slightly radioactive, the turbine building has to be considerably shielded as well. This leads to two buildings of similar construction with the taller one housing the reactor and the short long one housing the turbine hall and supporting structures.

en.wikipedia.org...





Some speculation from someone who appears to know what he's talking about:


@em1ss, In order to understand the Fukushima accident, you have to understand the basics of a Mark I BWR containment. A Mark I containment has two containments, the primary containment and the secondary containment (which, I, incorrectly, but commonly refer to as the drywell). The primary containment surrounds the reactor pressure vessel (RPV) and has a torus shaped supression pool. The secondary containment (also known as reactor building) surrounds the primary containment and contains the ECCS and spent fuel pools, from what I can tell from the news reports, this is what has failed in the explosion and it most likely damaged the torus as well.

The question is, ultimately, what else was damaged in the failure of the drywell? Vital components of the ECCS (emergency core cooling system), including HPCI, LPCI and RCIC are located in the drywell, and most likely, inoperable. They could also be losing cooling water inventory via a break through the main steam line, although depending on the location of the MSLIV, they might be ok. One also has to wonder if the integrity of the suppression pool (torus) is ok, because if the drywell failed, it is highly likely that the torus is damaged. This is very dangerous, because the supression pool ventilation network, which directly connects to the primary containment, which means the primary containment is essentially connected to the atmosphere! Also it is highly likely that normal reactor pressure control is severely limited because of the destruction of the torus. Ultimately, Fukushima is in a beyond-DBA LOCA and has already began a core melt, and the radiation release will most likely be in excess of three mile island, considering the loss of containment. If they dont get reactor cooling under control (which right now is now trivial task), they could be looking at a severe core melt with penetration of the RPV.

bravenewclimate.com...

edit on 12/3/11 by C0bzz because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 12 2011 @ 09:47 AM
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reply to post by C0bzz

I have read those posts C0bzz. If there was a hydrogen explosion, then you would be correct that the source is likely decomposition of a hydrogen-containing compound in the reactor (although I am not sure why zirconium cladding would liberate hydrogen). Liberated hydrogen would then be inside the primary containment wall. How exactly did it explode inside the primary containment wall and not damage it, yet manage to blow out the secondary containment wall?

If hydrogen was involved, the explosion was inside the primary containment, meaning the reactor is now exposed to air.

If they are now flooding the reactor with seawater, that also means it is exposed. As I explained in this post, water used to cool the reactor directly is separated from the outside by not one, but two self-contained loops. The primary heat exchanger is the large torus underneath the reactor in your picture. This is to prevent any contamination of environmental water from the neutron-rich radioactive water that pulls heat from the reactor itself.

They have breached this radiation protocol by flooding the reactor with seawater.

Believe what you will... this is a meltdown in progress.

TheRedneck



posted on Mar, 12 2011 @ 09:50 AM
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Believe what you will... this is a meltdown in progress.

Agreed, but at this stage I can't see another Chernobyl happening. Probably significant core melt with penetration through the reactor pressure vessel, which would make it worse than TMI.



posted on Mar, 12 2011 @ 09:54 AM
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More bad news this morning. With a meltdown in process what does this mean for
the people - how far will the radiation travel. When you think things can't get any worse,
they do. Thanks Redneck and everyone for the updates.

As for those on Facebook - people in Japan have absolutely no control over what
TPTB did in the past even more than we in US and else where have. Remember
the are just people going about their daily lives as we are. Please have some
compassion for humankind!



posted on Mar, 12 2011 @ 09:55 AM
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Originally posted by TheRedneck
This is looking bad...


Television pictures showed a massive blast at one of the buildings of the Fukushima-Daiichi plant, about 250km (160 miles) north-east of Tokyo.

A huge cloud of smoke billowed out and large bits of debris were flung far from the building.
Source: www.bbc.co.uk...

That is a pretty hefty explosion to fling out debris... not simply a vent, The only thing that could cause such inside the reactor is superheated water from burning fuel, which also indicates a problem with the control rods. If the control rods are properly inserted, the amount of heat would probably not be sufficient to cause anything more than a cracking of the containment and venting of steam.


Japan's nuclear agency said earlier on Saturday that radioactive caesium and iodine had been detected near the number one reactor of the power station.

The agency said this could indicate that containers of uranium fuel inside the reactor may have begun melting.
Source: www.bbc.co.uk...

I hate to say this, but it appears to me that even those trying to show this in the best possible light are admitting that this is a major disaster for the area. It would take a tremendous amount of steam to create such an explosion, and that indicates that a lot of water has been affected... water that is now radioactive steam.

Hydrogen could have played a role, of course, but probably after a breach of the atmosphere... there just isn't that much oxygen inside. Also, if hydrogen was involved, it indicates the explosion came from inside the primary containment, not the secondary... primary containment is the sheath of concrete surrounding the reactor itself.

That link also reports that they are flooding the reactor with water. That is a last-ditch effort to cool it down, as it negates the containment offered by the dual water loops I mentioned before.

CNN just reported live that the fuel rods are exposed. Yes, this is a meltdown. Yes, we are looking at another Chernobyl.


No, it will probably not severely affect the US West Coast. Radiation levels there will at worst be slightly elevated for a while.

The thing is, all hope for some containment is not lost... Japan is apparently working hard to mitigate the damage and I wish them all the best in those efforts.

TheRedneck


Hopefully there isn't a mini Chernobyl.



posted on Mar, 12 2011 @ 10:10 AM
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reply to post by C0bzz

One major difference between this event and Chernobyl is that the Japanese are very good technologically and will be (are?) doing everything they can to mitigate the damage, whereas a lot of the Chernobyl problems were caused by incompetence. In that respect, I can agree with you.

My comparison is that both are the result of a meltdown; both will release significant radiation into the surrounding area; both are massive radiation disasters. I am attempting to write these posts so the majority of posters can understand them; and in that respect, yes, this is equivalent to Chernobyl.

TMI did not experience a meltdown. It was a sensor malfunction that caused operators to make decisions that were incorrect, leading to overheating of the core and releasing a small amount of radiation into the surrounding environment as well as causing some minor melting inside the reactor chamber that damaged the reactor itself before it was checked. Operators relied on faulty sensor information from a malfunctioning display without referencing the backup systems (which showed no problem). Operator error caused by a minor malfunction.

Incidentally, the unit I worked on was of the same design as TMI. After the incident, additional safety precautions were designed into that reactor design specifically to prevent another such incident. Our reactors were retrofitted with the upgrades, which is why I got to actually see the thing. They had to remove large sections of the primary containment wall and re-pour them to make the upgrades.

TheRedneck



posted on Mar, 12 2011 @ 10:16 AM
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I would say this is 99% fake... but I'm posting it anyway...

Nuclear Fallout Map

From Here, Australian Radiation Services




550-750 rads - Nausia within a few hours ; no survivors

> 1000 rads - immediate incapacitation and death within a week or less.



posted on Mar, 12 2011 @ 10:18 AM
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oh crap this is not good at all ...


i hope to god that they can contain it i got a daughter on the west coast.



posted on Mar, 12 2011 @ 10:19 AM
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reply to post by TheRedneck
 


I'm trying to remember. What did the Russians do at Chernobyl?
Didn't they fly helicopters over it and throw sand on it?



posted on Mar, 12 2011 @ 10:30 AM
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reply to post by Eurisko2012

The problem was what they didn't do... they basically ran away and let the thing melt down, then came back and tried to figure out how to 'fix' it.


Containment has to happen now; it cannot be contained after the meltdown has occurred. Remember the fuel does not stop automatically; it 'burns' automatically. In a meltdown, the control rods are useless and other methods must be used to slow the reaction. The Japanese are trying to do that as we speak (type).

TheRedneck



posted on Mar, 12 2011 @ 10:34 AM
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reply to post by pmbhuntress
 


If that is a real map , thank god the fallout will go mostly into the ocean and not mainland Japan, The worst of it anyway.
edit on 12-3-2011 by bluemooone2 because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 12 2011 @ 10:38 AM
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reply to post by TheRedneck
 


Your not Professor robbin Grimes are you? He seems to be on the BBC a lot atm and looks remarkable like your avatar....



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