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Japan declares 'nuclear emergency' after quake

page: 143.htm
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posted on Mar, 16 2011 @ 06:14 PM
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reply to post by Fractured.Facade
 

I can not speak for anyone else about wanting this to happen..but my family has been in prayer that this all ends well.. My heart really goes out for the people on the island...I have friends there that I am very worried about that I have not been able to contact since the evac range was extended to 30km..so yes I DO NOT want anything to happen..

But I also feel we should not bury our heads in the sand so to speak...this is a learning experiance like no other...I just pray we learn from it..


Whats that old saying..."There, But for the Grace of God go I"




posted on Mar, 16 2011 @ 06:16 PM
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reply to post by Aeons
 


well they are right next to the ocean. how hard would be or have been to get a thousand tons of sand, cover the rods and inject the nitrogen. if they did it in russia, miles from the beach. and it stopped the worst nuclear disaster in history. why has this not even been an option to try?



posted on Mar, 16 2011 @ 06:18 PM
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And while all this is going on... the sarcophagus at Chernobyl is still old and still not replaced. It was made for 20 years... it's been there now for almost 25 years.

The Chernobyl Sarcophagus

These cracks and holes are further exacerbated by the intense heat inside the reactor, which is still over 200 degrees Celsius. The sarcophagus’s hastily and poorly built concrete walls, which are steadily sinking, act as a lid on the grave of the shattered reactor.

Twenty thousand tons of concrete floor is about to collapse into what has been described as a mix of radioactive lava and dust, which resulted from the dropping of tons of sand in the early attempts to put out the fire, formed by the fusion of molten fuel, concrete and dust.


And what's supposed to ``replace`` the sarcophagus in 2013... (if they have the money)

The steel arch enclosure—almost three football fields across and 32 stories high—will be the largest movable structure ever built.


So if you think it's just ``easy`` to just pour concrete on the Japanese nuclear reactors... it ain't.



posted on Mar, 16 2011 @ 06:18 PM
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Originally posted by MoonandStar
Even the low tech russians were dealing with the situation better than the japs right now.


Those 'low tech russian' (which is a farse, btw), werent dealing with an earthquake, tsunami, 6 reactors, around 450,000 displaced citizens and a crumpled infrastructure.

Quit trying to place blame...this event in unprecedented.



posted on Mar, 16 2011 @ 06:19 PM
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reply to post by Aeons
 





The exclusion zone around Chernobyl is 30 km. Why do you expect that the exclusion zone for this will be bigger?


Yes but Chernobyl was not a spent fuel pool fire...If you read a study I link to back on page 109 and started a Thread about...
The study was done in the U.S and determined that a spent fuel pool fire could render up to a 29,000 square mile area of land uninhabitial..

I pray that study is wrong



posted on Mar, 16 2011 @ 06:22 PM
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Double post plz delete
edit on 16-3-2011 by RickyD because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 16 2011 @ 06:22 PM
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reply to post by letscit
 


The differences I can see is that Russia is huge and has a lot of resources and they didn't have a 9.0 quake and 2 tsunamis. A large part of the island is demolished and I would wonder if they have shielding for the helos or could get all that done in time amidst a disaster of this magnitude. Its like trying to save a sinking ship when it's blowing up on fire half under and people are jumping without a bucket!



posted on Mar, 16 2011 @ 06:24 PM
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reply to post by okiecowboy
 


I can understand Why the Japanese Government is downplaying all of this. They are a very proud culture who historically have not accepted defeat. Probably some of the bravest most honest people on this planet...



posted on Mar, 16 2011 @ 06:24 PM
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reply to post by okiecowboy
 


I absolutely agree ther's a value in discussing this now, for instance, one initial line here in the UK was all about the fact that all future proposed nuclear plants would employ safety features that would eliminate the need for systems that have failed here - i.e. a reliance on pumps for cooling.

However, they didn't mention anything about water-cooled used-fuel storage, many tanks vulnerable to designed or accidental compromises could for all I know be either still in use, or still part of future designs, but now, thanks to this thread and the others, I will be able to ask those questions of our government...



posted on Mar, 16 2011 @ 06:26 PM
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reply to post by spark9576
 


Downplaying is not honesty...and I already posted where being too proud gets you. Every one needs help from time to time and to not accept it when it's needed gets you in a position like we see now. I really do hope the world has learned this important lesson!

ETA: Now it's not just effecting them it effects us all we all live on this planet and these effects aren't going away anytime soon. I mean how much sea water do you think has been pumped in since the start. Now where do you think it all went...no where good! If it was just effecting them I'd be more inclined to be more sympathetic but it effects us all and this government and the people involved with covering up the situation should be held responsible for the effects of that cover up. It's wrong no matter how you look at it. I don't want to lump all the Japanese people into this I'm sure they don't all think like that but the ones in control sure do...
edit on 16-3-2011 by RickyD because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 16 2011 @ 06:27 PM
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reply to post by Vitchilo
 


Yes, I've been hoping that one outcome of this will be to galvanise us into accelerating through some kind of completion of the new Chernobyl sarcophagus?

Couldn't the world skip an olympics and get it's act together to build a really top of the range one?



posted on Mar, 16 2011 @ 06:30 PM
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Its a shame they couldnt parcel it all up in something nice and tight and drop it down the Marianna Trench which is someway south of Japan.
edit on 16-3-2011 by ljonesyuk because: sp



posted on Mar, 16 2011 @ 06:30 PM
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Originally posted by curioustype
reply to post by Vitchilo
 


Yes, I've been hoping that one outcome of this will be to galvanise us into accelerating through some kind of completion of the new Chernobyl sarcophagus?

Couldn't the world skip an olympics and get it's act together to build a really top of the range one?


Its already under construction:



The Chernobyl Shelter Fund The Chernobyl Shelter Fund was established in 1997 at the Denver 23rd G8 summit to finance the Shelter Implementation Plan (SIP). The plan calls for transforming the site into an ecologically safe condition by means of stabilization of the sarcophagus followed by construction of a New Safe Confinement (NSC). While the original cost estimate for the SIP was US$768 million, the 2006 estimate was $1.2 billion. The SIP is being managed by a consortium of Bechtel, Battelle, and Electricité de France, and conceptual design for the NSC consists of a movable arch, constructed away from the shelter to avoid high radiation, to be slid over the sarcophagus. The NSC is expected to be completed in 2013, and will be the largest movable structure ever built. Dimensions: * Span: 270 m (886 ft) * Height: 100 m (330 ft) * Length: 150 m (492 ft)


en.wikipedia.org...

Something of that magnitude simply cannot be built very quickly though

eta: no surprise BECHTEL is involved in working on it, but thats for another thread



edit on 16-3-2011 by captaintyinknots because: (no reason given)

edit on 16-3-2011 by captaintyinknots because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 16 2011 @ 06:33 PM
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Taken from BBC news.




2319: The level of radiation detected at the Fukushima Daiichi plant has fallen steadily over the past 12 hours, an official at Japan's Nuclear and Industrial Safety Agency has said, according to the Reuters news agency. A level of 752 microsieverts per hour was recorded at the plant's main gate at 1700 on Wednesday (0800 GMT), said Tetsuo Ohmura. The monitoring point was then changed to the plant's west gate and readings were taken every 30 minutes, he said. At 0500 on Thursday (2000 GMT on Wednesday), the reading was 338 microsieverts per hour. That level is still much higher than it should be, but is not dangerous, Mr Ohmura added.



Up, down. Up, down. Who do you believe?



posted on Mar, 16 2011 @ 06:34 PM
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I heard one guy on the radio syaing that the press releases about radiation levels was potentially misleading with regards the MOX fuel or spent fuel, [or ceasium?] and type of radiation emmitted to be of concern, I think?

Does anyone know whther there may be reason to doubt the reassurances of the current announcements, and also whether ground readings say at the gate give a comprehensive picture if say the main issue is with a fire/plume?
edit on 16-3-2011 by curioustype because: typo - omitted caesium from list - corrected



posted on Mar, 16 2011 @ 06:35 PM
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Originally posted by letscit
what would liquid nitrogen do to this equation. sorry if this a dumb question, but that seems a sure way to cool these things down. but not sure what chemical reactions would be.

I would guess that the total amount of heat to be dissipated would be way greater than anything that could be compensated by what could be trucked-in - even with repeated shipments..

I think they tried using liquid nitrogen to do something a little bit like that at Chernobyl, but for a slightly different purpose. They were worried about stuff melting through the floor of the "non-containment" building (since Chernobyl didn't really have one). So, they were pumping liquid nitrogen into the basement of the building as a fall-back measure. It was later thought to have been a total waste of time, man-power (and lives) - as it is thought that it would have burned right through all that equipment.

edit on 2011-3-16 by EnhancedInterrogator because: spelling,e tc.



posted on Mar, 16 2011 @ 06:36 PM
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reply to post by RickyD
 


it should have been an option from the start. what about a having these close by as safety precautions? helicopters, sand and liquid nitrogen on stand by. maybe in the future. hell they couldve had another nation bring it in from the beginning. i dont think china, russia or the usa have been refusing to help. on the contrary, it is exactly what japan was trying to deny and what the other countries asked if they wanted. its great too be proud but at the expense of millions of lives? this is very sad, but seeming to look selfish at the least. btw, isnt pride a 7 deadly sin?



posted on Mar, 16 2011 @ 06:36 PM
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338 microsieverts??

Ok i'm not one to make false accusations but that simply cannot be true. The place looks like a warzone, the fuel pools are dry, and they seriously expect us to believe its going DOWN? If anything it's probably so high they don't want to tell us.



posted on Mar, 16 2011 @ 06:39 PM
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Originally posted by TheRedneck
reply to post by curioustype
TheRedneck

You forgot the volcano in the South.



posted on Mar, 16 2011 @ 06:41 PM
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I find it fascinating some of the comments in these threads on how proud, stoic, etc. the Japanese people are, and how if anyone can get through it, then they will.

It's all a load of rubbish.

Yes, IN GENERAL the Japanese are proud nation, just as practically every other nation on earth, but they are a nation of many millions of people, each with their own personalities - not some kind of borg with a hive mentality. If anything, economic prosperity has turned younger Japanese into lazy, self-centred navel gazers, just like the youth of every other rich nation.

Pre/post war Japan was a very different country. Apathy is just as strong there now as it is in every western country.

If anything the relatively homogeneous nature of Japanese society (something like 99.9 percent indigenous Japanese) combined with cultural legacies has created a very insular, closed political system that can't cope with anything outside the status-quo.

During the earthquake in Niigata about 5 or 6 years ago, the government was unable to cope with relief to a relatively small area - there were people dying of deep vein thrombosis weeks after the earthquake because they were cramped up sleeping in their cars! The government couldn't even provide temporary accommodation for about 10,000 people in a timely manner. Having said that, I think any government would struggle with such a task.

I think some people are in for a very rude shock when the realisation finally hits that there is no "mystical" quality about the Japanese - their government and citizens are just as fallible as the rest of us, and they are not coping at all with this disaster on all fronts.

My family in Sendai have told me they are already considering making improvised weapons to protect what resources they have. People are starting to kick into survival mode, and it will potentially get ugly quickly. At the end of the day Japanese people are only human beings - not some magical race of ninjas and samurai.

This whole sequence of events should be a wakeup call to anyone that is not directly affected by these events - governments cannot and will not look after you in during such a calamity - you need to prepare yourself during the good times for the bad times.




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