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Japan declares 'nuclear emergency' after quake

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posted on Mar, 16 2011 @ 04:42 PM
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reply to post by monica86
 

each of the reactors were storing spent fuel rods..there is also a separate building containing rods in a pool..and there is also I think some rods in dry storage on site.




posted on Mar, 16 2011 @ 04:42 PM
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reply to post by RUDDD
 


I believe you mean "graphite" and not "granite"



posted on Mar, 16 2011 @ 04:42 PM
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reply to post by switching yard
 


yes they should have started evacuating days ago, but it is man's arrogance that these reactors where built where they are and it is man's arrogance thinking he can control these out of control reactors. any evacuation in the very damaged areas will be futile. i have been wanting and posting them to evacuate for days. it amazes me how much man's arrogance have hurt us over the years. i pray for all in japan and all the surrounding areas.



posted on Mar, 16 2011 @ 04:42 PM
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Originally posted by TheRedneck
reply to post by Erasurehead

Do you have any information on whether Japan is receiving enough assistance to handle the evacs? The logistics of evacuation are becoming the main concern, I believe.

TheRedneck


That's a breath-taking proposition right there: trying to get people in the area out of harm's way when the worst comes.

The trains the Japanese so rely on are pretty much toast in that area, with screwed up tracks and no electricity to run them anyway.

The highways are in pieces or probably unsafe for masses of traffic, and the surface roads are pretty much a shambles as well and choked with debris. Plus how do people get gas from a pump with no electricity?

Airport runways are chopped up too, and there's no power for the towers or the towers have been laid waste.

Something tells me their gonna need every chopper they can lay their hands on and quick.



posted on Mar, 16 2011 @ 04:44 PM
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what would liquid nitrogen do to this equation. sorry if this a dumb question, but that seems a sure way to cool these things down. but not sure what chemical reactions would be.



posted on Mar, 16 2011 @ 04:45 PM
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Originally posted by captiva
Michio Kaku has swayed back and forth from " there is no problem" to "We have not yet hit the point of no return", At a moment like this he is the last person we need depend on for advice. I cant find the answer to the question of...Why on earth havnt the reactors been concreted before now? and why on earth are they not starting now, even if late? They have no options left !

Theres something not quite right here.




It's been my experience that the type of concrete used for shielding is a very dense material. Thus it is very heavy. It is so heavy, in fact, that a normal concrete truck cannot carry a full load. I do not know if that is due to the road weight restrictions or the load limit of the truck. With that said, the type of concrete that would provide the shielding value needed to lower the dose rate would be very hard to make, due to its special properties, hard to transport, and hard to put in place. It's not as easy as it may seem.

edit on 16-3-2011 by Hugues de Payens because: Editorial



posted on Mar, 16 2011 @ 04:48 PM
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reply to post by switching yard

I noticed the last part of that quote:

We have not yet hit the point of no return. But when we do, I think the only option left is this one.

Bolding mine.

I have said for many years that Michio Kaku is an extremely intelligent and informed individual who will say anything his audience wants to hear. I believe he is following the trend in this disaster, matching his words to what his audience wants to hear, as normal. That one bolded word above, however, stuck out to me.

Not if we hit the point of no return, but when we hit the point of no return.

Methinks the good Dr. Kaku just had a Freudian slip.

TheRedneck



posted on Mar, 16 2011 @ 04:50 PM
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In a rare show of defiance the Governor of the Fukushima region has come out to criticize the handling of the nuclear disaster.

This just in from the BBC news feed:

The Governor of the Fukushima region has criticised the official handling of the evacuation. Yuhei Sato said the people of Fukushima had reached the limits of "fear and anxiety". He said that if an evacuation was necessary, it would be difficult. "How do we move people, transport people?" he said. He said they had secured the "minimum food" but that daily supplies are all in shortage.

www.bbc.co.uk...

I guess this is why they have not called for an expanded evacuation beyond the 20km. Redneck, it looks like you were right the logistics of such a massive evacuation would be very difficult because the quake/tsunami destroyed the infrastructure. They can't seem to figure out how to get all those people out safely.




edit on 3/16/2011 by Erasurehead because: (no reason given)

edit on 3/16/2011 by Erasurehead because: I can't spell today.



posted on Mar, 16 2011 @ 04:52 PM
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reply to post by Hopeforeveryone

Actually, zirconium is very expensive. It was chosen as the cladding because it is normally resistant to chemical corrosion and has the semi-unique property of not impeding the flow of energetic neutrons. It's just one lone series of interactions, probably just now being realized in the nuclear industry, that led to this latest concern.

How does one plan for the unknown?

I don't attribute the use of zirconium to any profit motive or conspiracy... just one of those things no one thought about, because it was so unlikely.

TheRedneck



posted on Mar, 16 2011 @ 04:54 PM
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reply to post by letscit
 


My question is...where are they all going to go??
In the study I linked to on this thread www.abovetopsecret.com show that in the event of a spent rod pool fire an area of up to 29,000 square miles of land uninhabitable...how big is Japan?...
I think they should work on getting everyone they can off the island



posted on Mar, 16 2011 @ 04:54 PM
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Get out of Tokyo: Foreign Office tells all Britons to leave toxic radiation zone as Japanese 'lose control' of stricken reactor UK Mail

* U.S. nuclear chief: 'There is nothing preventing meltdown'
* French minister: 'Let's not beat about the bush, they've essentially lost control'
* Radioactive steam spews into atmosphere from reactor number three
* Experts warn that crisis is 'approaching point of no return' as officials run out of options
* Officials commandeer police water cannon to spray complex
* Top U.S. nuclear regulator says no water left in No. 4 reactor cooling pool, radiation levels extremely high
* Two more previously stable reactors begin to heat up
* Rich scramble to book private jets out the country as fleeing passengers pack Tokyo airport
* Workers battling nuclear meltdown evacuated for hours today after radiation levels increased


Seems the West is saying to hell with coverup crap and now US news crews are pulling out too.



posted on Mar, 16 2011 @ 04:56 PM
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reply to post by TheRedneck
 


Thank you for your research on this.

I think you are right, people should get away. The shear quantities and the nastiness of the MOX/plutonium etc..added to what you and others are clarifying about very real possibiities for either single or multiple high-energy explosions and heat generation and high altitude plumes...

Reading the updates on the BBC it looks, unfortunately, like a lot of people in Japan can't be evacuated, the governor of Fukushima prefecture now criticising the evacuation meaures and calling for a full evacuation but wondering where they will get the fuel for vehicles amidst the other problems in the country...perhaps that is one reason the gvernment is attempting to calm people?



posted on Mar, 16 2011 @ 04:57 PM
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reply to post by Erasurehead

I would have been much happier had I been wrong...


TheRedneck



posted on Mar, 16 2011 @ 04:59 PM
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reply to post by TheRedneck
 


I wonder if this will have a knock on effect on the industry, will they be looking for alternatives after this ? Does this incident indicate that it's intrinsically unsafe ? This incident is really showing me how little i know



posted on Mar, 16 2011 @ 04:59 PM
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So much for my idea of using Solidified Foam Filler. Temperature of that only goes up to 50'c, unless there's a way the US could manufacture pre-made shuttle tiles into a foam-state?



posted on Mar, 16 2011 @ 05:02 PM
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reply to post by switching yard
 


i believe that to be a rather conservative estimate. there is more people than that in tokyo alone. and they have been saying the winds will be blowing that way in about 24 hours. just unimaginable.



posted on Mar, 16 2011 @ 05:02 PM
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reply to post by TheRedneck
 


Redneck I just want thank you for being honest about the situation. I think we all, in our hearts know what is going to happen. But denial is unfortunately a very human trait!

Thank you to everyone for keeping this thread up to date, and posting links, some of which make very interesting reading.

My heart, thoughts and prayers go out to the people in Japan.



posted on Mar, 16 2011 @ 05:02 PM
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reply to post by curioustype

You know, in a way I do fell sorry for the Japanese government as well. The infrastructure was destroyed, fuel was unavailable, power was out, and then the nuclear plants starting showing distress signs. What would you or I do? There is no way to evacuate the people who desperately need evacuating, aid in en route but a couple days out, people are scared and looking to you for help...

I would try to buy time.

That is what they did. It just wasn't enough... by the time aid got there, the plants were too hot to effectively evacuate the area without the missions being suicidal.

...

Would you or I have done any different?

TheRedneck



posted on Mar, 16 2011 @ 05:05 PM
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reply to post by okiecowboy
 


all spent fuel rods need to be stored in pools
According to the design of fukushima such pools were in all the buildings.
we don't know what happened to the other pools though

This table says "no info" regarding these other spent fuel pools




posted on Mar, 16 2011 @ 05:09 PM
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Originally posted by TheRedneckI would try to buy time.

That is what they did. It just wasn't enough... by the time aid got there, the plants were too hot to effectively evacuate the area without the missions being suicidal.
...

Would you or I have done any different?


that's what I said in the beginning, surely they are buying time. and - considering the impact of 36 million people mass panicking... that would be a lot of dead people too, then.



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