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Japan declares 'nuclear emergency' after quake

page: 1391.htm
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posted on Aug, 13 2013 @ 05:50 AM
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Rad Particals Detected in the Air



www.tepco.co.jp...

Thanks Mat...would that mean that Unit 3 corium has sunk the deepest since its temps are the lowest? And what do you think is causing Unit 3 steaming?

All three units appear to have their temps rising.

www.tepco.co.jp...

www.tepco.co.jp...

www.tepco.co.jp...

- Purple Chive




posted on Aug, 13 2013 @ 07:56 AM
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reply to post by Purplechive
 


No clue PC, if we knew that we would be in great shape!!



posted on Aug, 13 2013 @ 08:27 AM
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And now, even the Huffington Post is jumping on the bandwagon...

The Danger at Fukushima Grows Even Worse

www.huffingtonpost.com...

"Aside from its location in an earthquake-prone tsunami zone, Fukushima Daichi was sited above a major aquifer. That critical reality has been missing from nearly all discussion of the accident since it occurred.

There can be little doubt at this point that the water in that underground lake has been thoroughly contaminated."

Not sure I knew that there was an Aquifer under the plant, did that info already come to light?



edit on 13-8-2013 by matadoor because: Added content because I can.



posted on Aug, 13 2013 @ 08:44 AM
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reply to post by matadoor
 


Also, read the comments. When the Huff's own band of merry people start comments like THIS, you understand why the MSM basically covers everything up until they have no choice in the matter. This is from a Huff post "super user":

"i'm having some difficulty with this article....what is the point of adding fuel to the usual fear mongering?in my opinion, any damage from the nuclear power accidents will never approach that of the hundreds coal powered plants and other fossil fuel usage over the last century...there are a lot of solutions needed across the board---but to me commentary like this isn't helping at all...."



posted on Aug, 13 2013 @ 10:56 AM
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reply to post by Purplechive
 


"would that mean that Unit 3 corium has sunk the deepest since its temps are the lowest? And what do you think is causing Unit 3 steaming? "
I could take a guess here purple. #3 had the mox. We know from the research here that the corium with the mox burns up to 1000 degrees hotter so I would guess, yes #3 has sunk the deepest.
It looks like at least one core hit the water table last month.
www.youtube.com...


July 31st more bags



posted on Aug, 13 2013 @ 02:00 PM
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Just thinking...

If a core has melted through the ground and into an underlying aquifer then I assume it will sink to the bottom, and continue it's downward path through the bottom of the underground lake.

If this happens, won't it just continue until it melts a hole through the crust and into whatever magma chamber lies beneath? The resulting pressure would cause further fracturing of the lake bed and ultimately resulting in a full collapse.

A caldera eruption is a type of volcanic activity where a lake bed collapses onto a magma chamber and results in a gigantic steam explosion. It's an extremely violent geological event, measured in 100's of megatons, and seriously effect global weather patterns for years.

Is this a possible end result of this meltdown?

[ editby]edit on 13-8-2013 by UnderGetty because: Addition



posted on Aug, 13 2013 @ 02:33 PM
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reply to post by UnderGetty
 


I would have to think that a huge (define huge...) underground water source would be able to dissipate a significant number of BTU's worth of heat, maybe hitting the huge water table might actually slow these things down?

Don't know what water tables are fed from there, but in all honesty, I'm wondering if this ends up being a saving grace to keep these stupid things cool until they stop reacting enough to not burn through. If the coriums end up just stuck in there, maybe the answer then is to find out what else is fed from this aquifer to make sure they contain the radiation as much as possible.

Just one possible "hopeful" thing to come to light, unless the water source still isn't big enough to keep these coriums cool.



posted on Aug, 13 2013 @ 05:34 PM
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Oh man, it's called PIG PILE!!!!

Abenomics And The Fukushima Syndrome

www.marketoracle.co.uk...



posted on Aug, 13 2013 @ 07:20 PM
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reply to post by matadoor
 



Not sure I knew that there was an Aquifer under the plant, did that info already come to light?


Yeah, we covered it a few times a while back. A couple of relevant posts:

Originally posted by crimsonlion

Originally posted by Aircooled
Look what a friend found?



www.microsofttranslator.com... 011%2F06%2F10%2Fphoto_2.jpg

And a chart showing Daini as well.
www.microsofttranslator.com...


Nice find! For those of you who don't know Japanese, I translated most of it for you. Some of the kanji was so blurry that I couldn't read it. And about the kanji I labled as "taga group" - I've researched it, and it seems to be just an older layer of rocks. Hope this helps!

My translated image:


edit on 24-2-2012 by crimsonlion because: I left something out of it.


post by crimsonlion on page 1220

and


Originally posted by manicminxx
J&C, no idea about the water wall, unfortunately. The literal meanings of the characters for "particles" in that picture are "grain-child," so it is, unfortunately, a very broad term. When there are things not explicitly said but likely inferred, I promise I will make notes at the bottom to convey as much as possible.


All that being said, For this next image, do you have any more context than what I could translate? Only because there's a character that could mean "tearing/severing/breaking" (as in the earth) or "analysis" (as in the document). It changes the meaning of the image considerably and there's really not enough context for me to say definitely what it is, one way or the other.



I'm on a roll... if anyone wants anything else translated.
Again, it's not native, but hopefully a bit more informative than Google translator.


post by manimmminx on page 1222
edit on 13-8-2013 by jadedANDcynical because: fixed link


And for completion's sake, here is the other one by manicminxx on page 1222:


Originally posted by manicminxx


DWW, got the tags worked out, thanks!

Also, disclaimer, Japanese involves both literal and conceptual translation
Hope this helps... still more to come between working, sleeping, eating.
edit on 26-2-2012 by manicminxx because: (no reason given)

edit on 13-8-2013 by jadedANDcynical because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 13 2013 @ 08:35 PM
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Oh this can't be good. Remember the 6 or 8 "inground pools" they built to hold radioactive water because they were too cheap to buy more tanks? They empied them in June because they were leaking. Well they're bulging like balloons.
ex-skf.blogspot.ca...

Can you imagine? That whole west hill could give way with a mud slide. No wonder they're crapping bricks and all of a sudden the MSM is chatty!



posted on Aug, 13 2013 @ 09:23 PM
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reply to post by Aircooled
 


That whole site seems to be liquifying. Even a middling earthquake can devastate an area that is in this state.

Hell, they don't even know where the radioactive material is. Has it sunk. If it has sunk then that would explain the steam from number 3. Heat plus water equals steam.

P



posted on Aug, 14 2013 @ 08:43 AM
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More details on the "Ice wall"..

Japan considers mile-long ice wall to stop radiation leaks

www.theverge.com...

"The pipes would be installed between 20 and 40 meters (66 and 132 feet) below the ground, turning a mile-long stretch of earth into a frozen wall. The Japanese government wants to keep the ground frozen for six years, starting in July 2015."

More on the Ice Wall:

How to Build an Ice Wall Around a Leaking Nuclear Reactor

www.theatlantic.com...


edit on 14-8-2013 by matadoor because: Added content.



posted on Aug, 14 2013 @ 08:47 AM
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Oh boy, then this nugget:

Insight: After disaster, the deadliest part of Japan's nuclear clean-up

in.reuters.com...

"The operator of Japan's crippled Fukushima nuclear plant is preparing to remove 400 tons of highly irradiated spent fuel from a damaged reactor building, a dangerous operation that has never been attempted before on this scale."

More news on this:

www.globalpost.com...

edit on 14-8-2013 by matadoor because: Adding nuggets.



posted on Aug, 14 2013 @ 02:54 PM
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Damn. At this point the story is starting to remind me of Akira Kurosawa's movie "Dreams."
(Great Flick, i love this film maker so much.)
Dreams

Mount Fuji in Red
A large nuclear power plant near Mount Fuji has begun to melt down; its six reactors explode one by one. The breaches fill the sky with hellish red fumes and send millions of Japanese citizens fleeing in terror towards the ocean. After an unspecified amount of time, two men, a woman, and her two small children are seen alone, left behind on land in broad daylight. Behind them is the sea. The older man, who is dressed in a business suit, explains to the younger man that the rest have drowned themselves in the ocean. He then says that the several colours of the clouds billowing across the now rubbish-strewn, post-apocalyptic landscape signify different radioactive isotopes; according to him, red signifies plutonium-239, a tenth of a microgram of which is enough to cause cancer. He elaborates on how other released isotopes cause leukemia (strontium-90) and birth defects (cesium-137) before wondering at the foolish futility of colour-coding radioactive gases of such lethality.
The woman, hearing these descriptions, recoils in horror before angrily cursing those responsible and the pre-disaster assurances of safety they had given. The suited man then displays contrition, suggesting that he is in part responsible for the disaster. The other man, dressed casually, watches the multicoloured radioactive clouds advance upon them. When he turns back towards the others at the shore, he sees the woman weeping: the suit-clad man has leaped to his death. A cloud of red dust reaches them, causing the mother to shrink back in terror. The remaining man attempts to shield the mother and her children by using his jacket to feebly fan away the now-incessant radioactive billows.

The Weeping Demon
A man finds himself wandering around a misty, bleak mountainous terrain. He meets a strange oni-like man, who is actually a mutated human with one horn. The "demon" explains that there had been a nuclear holocaust which resulted in the loss of nature and animals, enormous dandelions and humans sprouting horns, which cause them so much agony that you can hear them howling during the night, but, according to the demon, they can't die, which makes their agony even worse. This is actually a post-apocalyptic retelling of a classic Buddhist fable of the same name.



posted on Aug, 14 2013 @ 03:56 PM
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reply to post by jadedANDcynical
 


Thanks J&C, appreciate it.



posted on Aug, 14 2013 @ 04:42 PM
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Unit Foundations?



Thanks AC and Mat for the corium supposition. Kinda amazing that the most lethal substance known to every living creature on this planet -- it's whereabouts is unknown and totally out of control.

Another question --- anyone see data on the stability of the reactor buildings lately. TEPCO use to report the NE, NW, SE, SW depth.

- Purple Chive



posted on Aug, 14 2013 @ 07:28 PM
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I have a question for the learned.

Assuming for a moment the three corium blobs have broken through the containment, what prevents them from interacting together once the hit the earth herself? It seems to me the reactors were not very far apart at that level.

Can the three blobs begin interacting in a much more diabolical way?

What if the three move say a mile or two down and drift toward one another?



posted on Aug, 14 2013 @ 07:44 PM
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Pray you visit Japan before that happens, because i doubt it would be worth visiting after that happened.



posted on Aug, 14 2013 @ 11:05 PM
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reply to post by crankyoldman
 


I think we should stop referring to it as "Containment"

Again, just a guess but the cores would take the path of least resistance, whatever direction that might be?

We have a 5.0 near fuk.


hisz.rsoe.hu...

TEPCO finally released the video of the pedestal inspection of unit 2. This showed more than the initial images given to the press. As they moved the camera scope closer to the pedestal down the control rod rail the condition became more black and charred. It also appeared as if the rail no longer connected to the pedestal and may be moved to one side. As they approached the opening in the pedestal for the rail they had to view sideways to located the opening.
www.fukuleaks.org...
The video seems to have been pulled.

The numbers we feed you are a joke. We make them up.
fukushima-diary.com...



posted on Aug, 15 2013 @ 12:59 AM
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Originally posted by matadoor
Oh boy, then this nugget:

Insight: After disaster, the deadliest part of Japan's nuclear clean-up

in.reuters.com...

"The operator of Japan's crippled Fukushima nuclear plant is preparing to remove 400 tons of highly irradiated spent fuel from a damaged reactor building, a dangerous operation that has never been attempted before on this scale."

More news on this:

www.globalpost.com...

edit on 14-8-2013 by matadoor because: Adding nuggets.


This latest news is very worrying. Can anyone explain to me, without hyperbole and just cold hard facts, how bad an unintended criticality would actually be once initiated? And who in the area (or elsewhere) would be affected in a worst case scenario? Thanks.

Peace.



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