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Japan declares 'nuclear emergency' after quake

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posted on Mar, 16 2011 @ 03:56 PM
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reply to post by TheRedneck
 


Great job on the research!! thank you
I was digging but was looking in the wrong direction




posted on Mar, 16 2011 @ 03:57 PM
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reply to post by blackcat99
 


In other words - "repeat our BS and don't ask questions"

Man, the Japanese authorities are really starting to grind my gears



posted on Mar, 16 2011 @ 03:58 PM
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reply to post by Fractured.Facade

I haven't found anything that compares zirconium hydride to other explosives (zirconium is one of those new metals we are really just learning the uses of, apparently), but based on what I have read I would say low. Hydrogen released from the zirconium hydride during thermal decomposition is extremely explosive, however.

And yes, before anyone asks, it is the same element used in fake diamonds.


TheRedneck



posted on Mar, 16 2011 @ 04:01 PM
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Hi,

I just want to ask if anyone knows 'what can be done' - to help with the spent fuel rods. Everyone seems to know what can't be done, such as spraying them in water. So what are the alternatives? What would be the safest way to move forward with this situation?



posted on Mar, 16 2011 @ 04:02 PM
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reply to post by Curio
 


My sentiments exactly. It's one thing to be dignified and save face. It's quite another to act like a bunch of lemmings!

It's almost as if they want to die.
edit on 16-3-2011 by windwaker because: Misspelled "be"



posted on Mar, 16 2011 @ 04:02 PM
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reply to post by Hugues de Payens

Yes, the whole reason the rods have to be kept underwater is that they continue to produce heat and radiation, just below levels that are efficient for producing electricity. That is the source of the heat and radiation. My only question was why the concern over an explosion, because while uranium burns (spontaneously at those temperatures) it doesn't burn fast enough to explode.

The zirconium hydride does.

Uranium = heat and flame
Zirconium hydride = explosive charge

TheRedneck



posted on Mar, 16 2011 @ 04:05 PM
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reply to post by ceekay

The safest thing to do is stay the Hades away from this monster. There is no way to control it now. There is no solution.

Evacuate or die.

TheRedneck



posted on Mar, 16 2011 @ 04:05 PM
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reply to post by TheRedneck
 


TheRedneck - thanks for all of your contributions on this thread, it is greatly appreciated.


Perhaps a dumb question, but why are these spent fuel rods considered "spent"? It would appear that they are still capable of being productive...



posted on Mar, 16 2011 @ 04:06 PM
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Hey fellas got this off Pravda - not the most reliable source of news but only news i could find about Zirconium

"Each plant has "30,000 to 40,000 rods - composed of twenty tones of zirconium." It alone works well, allowing "neutrons from the fuel pellets in the rods to pass freely between the rods and thus a nuclear chain reaction to be sustained."

But not without "a huge problem...." Zirconium "is highly volatile and when hot will explode spontaneously upon contact with air, water or steam." With tons used in nuclear plants, in "a compound called 'zircaloy,' it "clads tens of thousands of fuel rods."

Any interruption of coolant builds quickly. However, because of zirconium's explosive power, the equivalent of nitroglycerine, it catches fire and explodes "at a temperature of 2,000 degrees Fahrenheit, well below the 5,000 degree temperature of a meltdown."

Before it happens, it can cause hydrogen explosions "by drawing oxygen from water and steam letting it off," what happened at Fukushima. They, in turn, create more heat, "bringing the zirconium itself closer and closer to its explosive level," what may, in fact, have happened, perhaps bad enough to cause a full meltdown.

Using tons of explosive material like zirconium is "absolutely crazy." Doing it makes every nuclear plant a ticking time bomb, vulnerable to explode, spewing lethal poisons into the atmosphere.


edit on 16-3-2011 by Hopeforeveryone because: punctuation



posted on Mar, 16 2011 @ 04:07 PM
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reply to post by windwaker
 


According to physicist Michio Kaku, the last ditch effort would be to bury the plant in sand, boron (or boric acid?) and concrete.

Coincidentally, South Korea announced today that they're sending quite a lot of tonnage of boron to the scene.

Sorry, this was meant to be a reply to Ceekay, not Windwaker.
edit on 16-3-2011 by switching yard because: to clarify



posted on Mar, 16 2011 @ 04:08 PM
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reply to post by Hopeforeveryone

Got a link to that page? I want to read more about that.

TheRedneck



posted on Mar, 16 2011 @ 04:09 PM
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reply to post by TheRedneck
 


Wow! That's a really harsh statement!

Wouldn't just walking away cause problems across the whole globe though? Surely that much radiation and whatever else will be released (I'm not a nuclear tech!) won't just be confined to Japan?

Those poor people! This is so heart wrenching!



posted on Mar, 16 2011 @ 04:10 PM
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Originally posted by ceekay
Hi,

I just want to ask if anyone knows 'what can be done' - to help with the spent fuel rods. Everyone seems to know what can't be done, such as spraying them in water. So what are the alternatives? What would be the safest way to move forward with this situation?


what about putting lots of sand onto the plants?
if the fuel gets hot enough it will melt the sand and contain itself within the generated glas and disperse and cool down.
if the fuel stays below melting temperature of silicon dioxide it will at least keep things covered and contain radiation leakage.



posted on Mar, 16 2011 @ 04:10 PM
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Originally posted by TheRedneck
reply to post by Fractured.Facade

I haven't found anything that compares zirconium hydride to other explosives (zirconium is one of those new metals we are really just learning the uses of, apparently),


Begs the question then ... What the hell is this stuff doing in a nuclear reactor?

No answer is actually necessary,. but damn, did anyone ever think of this possibility?



posted on Mar, 16 2011 @ 04:11 PM
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reply to post by TheRedneck
 


english.pravda.ru...

haven't sussed out links and such yet, i know i'm terrible


Oh seems i have - how did that happen ?

edit on 16-3-2011 by Hopeforeveryone because: due to observed brainlessness




posted on Mar, 16 2011 @ 04:11 PM
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Originally posted by TheRedneck
reply to post by Hugues de Payens

Yes, the whole reason the rods have to be kept underwater is that they continue to produce heat and radiation, just below levels that are efficient for producing electricity. That is the source of the heat and radiation. My only question was why the concern over an explosion, because while uranium burns (spontaneously at those temperatures) it doesn't burn fast enough to explode.

The zirconium hydride does.

Uranium = heat and flame
Zirconium hydride = explosive charge

TheRedneck


I have no idea about the physics of this relative to the possibility of an explosion. Can't help ya there. The only thing that comes to my mind is purely speculation. Thus I will not post it.



posted on Mar, 16 2011 @ 04:12 PM
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CNN is hilarious. I've been watching throughout the day. At the end of one program around 4:55 EST they were saying US officials are saying there is no risk to North America at this time. Then they transitioned to the Situation Room at 5:00 EST and the first thing out of the anchor's mouth was something like 'Situation in Japan is very serious and radiation levels are EXTREMELY HIGH'. They contradict themselves.

It's interesting to watch the Japanese news then watch later how American news twists everything to sound exciting and try to hype the situation.

I've been watching NHK world and YokosoNews on ustream if anyone else is interested in a first hand account instead of sensational American news.
edit on 16-3-2011 by DantesPeak because: Spelling correction for YokosoNews



posted on Mar, 16 2011 @ 04:13 PM
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Pretty lethal situation according to this just posted on BBC live blog...

Should the water evaporate away, the spent rods could ignite, sending huge volumes of radioisotopes into the air. 100 rapid deaths within 500 miles. Over 100,000 deaths over time. Of course, this is a worse-case scenario.



posted on Mar, 16 2011 @ 04:16 PM
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reply to post by TheRedneck
 


This pretty much confirms your point. From BBC


2110: Stuart Blackburn from Osaka writes: "Today, I and other Britons were contacted by the foreign office, and asked to refer to a report from the government's Chief Science Officer for advice. His conclusion was plain; even if the reactors meltdown, we would be in no danger. There is no reason to leave. For me, this was the clear, expert opinion I had been waiting for. I shall not leave Japan. I began to spread the word to friends. Until, that is, I read an article from the New York Times. The reactor blasts have exposed storage pools of spent fuel to the outside. With the cooling systems down, the water covering the fuel is boiling away, and engineers are unable to conduct repairs. Should the water evaporate away, the spent rods could ignite, sending huge volumes of radioisotopes into the air. 100 rapid deaths within 500 miles. Over 100,000 deaths over time. Of course, this is a worse-case scenario. But the once quenched debate is re-ignited. Should we stay? For now, we can only wait, and talk."


www.bbc.co.uk...



posted on Mar, 16 2011 @ 04:17 PM
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I'd imagine pouring sand over the facility would only end up glassing it over as Tektite, and in any eventuality having this spill-out as a liquid source if you put too much of the stuff over it anyway. The core itself will be burning at 3000'c, it'd be like chocolate over a fire.




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